Please turn on javascript in your browser to play chess.
Only Chess Forum

Only Chess Forum

  1. 09 Dec '08 05:40
    I learned how to play Chess many, many years ago as a 5-year old child. Being hooked, I played in School Teams right up to teenage level. And yet, after 1000's of games, it was not until I was about 14 or so, playing in School Teams, that I discovered En Pasant!

    What are other player's experience?
  2. 09 Dec '08 06:25
    I was taught when young and used it on a teacher and beat him and he didn't know it was a real move. He wasn't very happy with my play. It should be learned when playing chess before a game is even commenced.
  3. 09 Dec '08 08:26
    i didn't know about it until i started playing on this site...saying that, i had just played 4 or 5 people before that.
  4. 09 Dec '08 09:49
    The rule of En Pasant is my favourite one #2. Sometimes it comes out of the blue only to mess up for my opponent.

    But my favourit one, #1, is the rule of stalemate!
  5. 09 Dec '08 10:25
    I too learnt to play chess at a young age but it wasn't until my teens when I discovered en passant. It's almost like it still hasn't been fully accepted yet. Then again, trying to explain it to my 8 year old step son wasn't the easiest of tasks...

    "But that's cheating!!"

    "Err... no, it's a legal move.. really."

    So I can't blame my elders for leaving it for me to discover. Maybe I should have done the same.
  6. 09 Dec '08 10:34
    Part of the game learned it when I was 12 years old. I'm amazed at people who say they played for years and weren't aware of it. What they mean is they played a bunch of other n00Bs for years who knew even less about chess than they did and nobody in their circle was aware of how to play a legal game of chess.
  7. Subscriber AttilaTheHorn
    Erro Ergo Sum
    09 Dec '08 12:57
    I agree that it should be learned with all the other rules as you are taught them. There's nothing worse than playing a player who doesn't know the rules, because he often won't believe you when you take advantage of a rule that rarely comes up like en passant. And it is a real nuisance dealing with kids in school tournaments who have not paid attention when I teach it to them. If you're going to play the game, then know all the rules!
  8. 09 Dec '08 13:33
    Originally posted by AttilaTheHorn
    There's nothing worse than playing a player who doesn't know the rules, ...
    It's worse playing with people who says, and actually believes it:
    "It's true! It's rules! You are allowed to play one pawn two steps *or* two pawns one step each in the first move!"
    or
    "Yes, I know you checked me, but you didn't say 'check' so I don't have to care!"
    or
    "You cannot move any of your pieces, yeah, I won!"
    or
    "Sure I can change my move, I said 'Jaydoyb', didn't I?"
  9. 09 Dec '08 14:10
    I learned to play from my Dad and he bought me an introduction book. It covered legal moves of the pieces, checkmate, stalemate, 50 move rule, agreed draws, 3 move repition, en-passant and had two annotated games. The Evergreen game and the Immortal game. Excellent book, unfortunately I cannot find it, else I would give it to my kids.
  10. Standard member ivan2908
    SelfProclaimedTitler
    09 Dec '08 14:20 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by znsho
    I learned how to play Chess many, many years ago as a 5-year old child. Being hooked, I played in School Teams right up to teenage level. And yet, after 1000's of games, it was not until I was about 14 or so, playing in School Teams, that I discovered En Pasant!

    What are other player's experience?
    I hate en passant rule. I didn't once run into inferior position on purpose by playing en passant just because it looked cool
  11. Subscriber AttilaTheHorn
    Erro Ergo Sum
    09 Dec '08 16:02
    >It also astounds me, especially in youth tournaments, the number of players who don't know the 50-move rule and that the count starts all over again once a pawn is moved or a capture made, and some of the arbiters in these youth tournaments don't understand it too.
    >A lot of players don't fully understand the 3-fold repetition rule too, not understanding that the repetition need not be consecutive.
    >In addition, there is also no such thing as perpetual check in the rules; the 3-fold repetition rule is the only one that applies here. However, a draw can be agreed upon.
    >I've played about 700 games here on RHP, and only once has en passant been applied. So it doesn't come up that often, but all chess players should know it. There is no excuse for not knowing the rules.
    >And while I'm on this rant, what's so hard to understand about stalemate? It's simple!
  12. 09 Dec '08 16:17
    Originally posted by znsho
    I learned how to play Chess many, many years ago as a 5-year old child. Being hooked, I played in School Teams right up to teenage level. And yet, after 1000's of games, it was not until I was about 14 or so, playing in School Teams, that I discovered En Pasant!

    What are other player's experience?
    I came to know En-Pesant when I lost a winning game due to this. Because my opponent took a great benefit by using it.
  13. Standard member Dragon Fire
    Lord of all beasts
    09 Dec '08 17:13
    I certainly did not know about it for a considerable time after I started. Fortunately I never had the embarassment of being caught out as by the time an opponent played it against me for the 1st time I knew the move. No doubt, however, there were many games prior to then when en passant could have affected the course of the game.
  14. Standard member Dragon Fire
    Lord of all beasts
    09 Dec '08 17:16
    Originally posted by AttilaTheHorn
    >In addition, there is also no such thing as perpetual check in the rules; the 3-fold repetition rule is the only one that applies here. However, a draw can be agreed upon.

    >And while I'm on this rant, what's so hard to understand about stalemate? It's simple!
    Perpetual check causes a draw either by 3-fold repetition or the 50 move rule, which comes (and is claimed) first.

    I knew about stalemate very early on as it was explained to me when I was told about check mate.
  15. Subscriber AttilaTheHorn
    Erro Ergo Sum
    09 Dec '08 17:53
    Originally posted by Dragon Fire
    Perpetual check causes a draw either by 3-fold repetition or the 50 move rule, which comes (and is claimed) first.

    I knew about stalemate very early on as it was explained to me when I was told about check mate.
    Yes that is true, but my point is that perpetual check does not exist in the rules. Perpetual check will eventually cause a draw (if it is claimed) but you won't find perpetual check anywhere in the rules of chess.