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  1. 07 Mar '07 22:05
    I find it intriguing that until a few years ago, most people wouldn't touch endgame study with a ten-foot pole, and very few decent endgame books existed. Now, it seems that there's a lot of interest in endgame study (or at least, people are "talking" about endgame study), and a number of very good endgame books have been written in the last few years, one of the latest being Van Perlo's Endgame Tactics, which just won the Chesscafe 2006 Book of the Year award.

    I guess different areas of chess go in and out of favor all the time, but I still find it amazing that this endgame area could generate so much momentum so quickly. Any comments, opinions?
  2. 07 Mar '07 22:13
    Well I think that most people like to study the opening and the middlegame so that they can gain a quick advantage, but what people have realized is that more and more people are using modern and indian defences which make the game last longer and delay piece contact. Also, people are using less symmetrical defences which create more imbalances.

    In order to understand how you can convert an imbalance into a win you must understand the endgame because this is what every long game will wind down to and if you dont know how to convert a slight endgame advantage into a win then you won't be able to know how to create that slight advantage from the imbalances that we so often see.

    This is what I think anyway.
  3. Standard member Dies Irae
    I Love U
    07 Mar '07 22:39
    Endgames are
  4. 08 Mar '07 00:54
    Originally posted by ChessJester
    Well I think that most people like to study the opening and the middlegame so that they can gain a quick advantage, but what people have realized is that more and more people are using modern and indian defences which make the game last longer and delay piece contact. Also, people are using less symmetrical defences which create more imbalances.

    In or ...[text shortened]... that slight advantage from the imbalances that we so often see.

    This is what I think anyway.
    and you are correct...
    but you don't need an over-extensive understanding ov endgames for this advantage...
    you just need to monitor the cause/effect on your pawn structure...
    usually, if your pawn structure is solid, and you can just try to disrupt your opponents, your endgame position will speak for itself...
    as that one guy said:
    Pawns are the soul of chess
    and i have adopted this as my motto for all games...
    no being much of a tactician, i rely heavily on my understanding of pawn structures and that sort of thing...
    it has yet to fail me against other players of similar strenght...
    the pawn is the most underrated piece in the history of everything...
  5. 09 Mar '07 01:10 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by ChessJester
    Well I think that most people like to study the opening and the middlegame so that they can gain a quick advantage, but what people have realized is that more and more people are using modern and indian defences which make the game last longer and delay piece contact. Also, people are using less symmetrical defences which create more imbalances.

    In or that slight advantage from the imbalances that we so often see.

    This is what I think anyway.
    That's a good point.



    I find that endgames are the most fun, boring, rewarding, and difficult part of a chess game.
  6. Standard member coentje
    Plop!
    09 Mar '07 03:12
    Originally posted by rubberjaw30
    the pawn is the most underrated piece in the history of everything...
    I think that that might be overrating the pawn a little bit

    but back on topic, end games are for people who are not good enough to kill off their opponent in the opening or middle game
  7. Standard member wormwood
    If Theres Hell Below
    09 Mar '07 03:16
    Originally posted by coentje
    I think that that might be overrating the pawn a little bit

    but back on topic, end games are for people who are not good enough to kill off their opponent in the opening or middle game
    bahus has a funny quote on his blog: "When I hear the word 'Endgame' I reach for my revolver."






    still, endgame has to be learned at some point. there's no getting around it.
  8. 09 Mar '07 04:15
    its like any part of chess if you study the openings you'll boost your rating a little bit higher then you study middle games and tactics it boosts it higher and higher. if you have a won endgame position and can't finish it then hwats the point of gaining hte advantages. i'm at 1600 now and i just learned how to mate with a knight and a rook and it sucks!!! but worth learning.
  9. 09 Mar '07 14:13
    I'll admit, endgames are the weakest part of my game and is probably what's holding me back from getting to a much higher rating. I fight hard all game and usually make ridiculous pawn and King moves in the end and throw away all the hard work.
  10. 09 Mar '07 14:16
    Originally posted by wormwood
    bahus has a funny quote on his blog: "When I hear the word 'Endgame' I reach for my revolver."






    still, endgame has to be learned at some point. there's no getting around it.
    where is bahus blog? please tell me.
  11. 09 Mar '07 14:21
    Does anyone know if "Silman's Complete Endgame Course: From Beginner To Master" is just as good if not better than "Endgame Tactics: A Comprehensive Guide to the Sunny Side of Chess Endgames". I'm debating which one to get...
  12. Subscriber Marinkatomb
    wotagr8game
    09 Mar '07 14:36
    Originally posted by Dies Irae
    Endgames are
    How can any self respecting chess player say that! A well played ending is one of the best thrills in chess!
  13. 09 Mar '07 14:37
    Originally posted by 93confirmed
    Does anyone know if "Silman's Complete Endgame Course: From Beginner To Master" is just as good if not better than "Endgame Tactics: A Comprehensive Guide to the Sunny Side of Chess Endgames". I'm debating which one to get...
    Of the two I have read Silman's Complete Endgame course and I did not find anything new ideas until the class A section, but I have previously spent time studying Soltis' Grandmaster Secrets Endgames and Pandolfini's Endgame books. I really like Silmans teaching style however. His writing is concise, and he explains variations without getting bogged down in them.
  14. 09 Mar '07 15:15
    Originally posted by 93confirmed
    Does anyone know if "Silman's Complete Endgame Course: From Beginner To Master" is just as good if not better than "Endgame Tactics: A Comprehensive Guide to the Sunny Side of Chess Endgames". I'm debating which one to get...
    I haven't read either one, but I've read the reviews. According to the reviews, both books are excellent, but they have different goals in mind. Silman's book is strictly an instructional book organized by strength levels. But it isn't dry reading like many other endgame books. (Silman's books are noted for their readability.)

    On the other hand, Van Perlo's book is a collection of endgame positions from actual play. This book was written primarily for the sheer joy and entertainment of the endgame tactics, although I'm sure the author intended the reader to learn something from the game positions.

    I glanced at the excerpt of the Van Perlo book (the last link below), and I suspect that a beginner might have a hard time following most of the book. (Or, at the least, he'd have to go very slowly over the positions.) It seems to be geared to at least the average club player.

    http://www.chessville.com/reviews/SilmansCompleteEndgameCourse.htm

    http://www.chesscafe.com/text/review555.pdf

    http://nic.net4u.nl/Shop/Images/PDFs/endgames.pdf

    So if you want to just learn endgames in the quickest manner, I'd go with Silman. But if you want to be entertained at a club level or higher (and maybe learn something along the way), go with Van Perlo.
  15. Standard member wormwood
    If Theres Hell Below
    09 Mar '07 15:25
    Originally posted by bikingviking
    where is bahus blog? please tell me.
    http://patzersmind.blogspot.com/