Please turn on javascript in your browser to play chess.
Only Chess Forum

Only Chess Forum

  1. 26 Apr '07 15:02 / 2 edits
    Following buddy2's comment that there are many threads on openings but few on endings....

    The opposition: It took me a while to get to understand this but I find it very useful in king & pawn endings.



    In this position if it is black to move then white "has the opposition" and black has to concede ground. This is winning for white as white has the king in front of the pawn.

    Now if it is white to move then black has the opposition - but white has a trick: 1.e3...now white has the opposition and black must lose ground by either stepping back or moving to the side and allowing the white king to move forward...from here whites king can protect the pawn all the way to the queening square.
  2. Standard member DeepThought
    Losing the Thread
    26 Apr '07 15:18
    The corrolory to that is that if black has the opposition, and white doesn't have the pawn move then it's a draw. This (nearly) came up in this game Game 3236996, on my last move I played 67. ... Kc6, but I could also have kept the draw with 67. ... Kc8 as after 68. Kb5 I have 68. ... Kb7 and if 68. Kc5 Kc7 and pushing the pawn creates the same end position as in the game but with everything shifted down a rank.
  3. 26 Apr '07 15:41
    Originally posted by Mahout
    Following buddy2's comment that there are many threads on openings but few on endings....

    The opposition: It took me a while to get to understand this but I find it very useful in king & pawn endings.

    [fen]8/8/4k3/8/4K3/8/4P3/8 w - - 0 1[/fen]

    In this position if it is black to move then white "has the opposition" and black has to concede ground. ...[text shortened]... move forward...from here whites king can protect the pawn all the way to the queening square.
    However, if the setup is white king on the 6th rank, black king on 8th, then white always (except for rook pawns) wins even without the opposition.
  4. 26 Apr '07 16:08 / 2 edits
    It's an excellent exercise to start with a white king on e1, a white pawn on e2 and a black king on e8. First play with White and make sure you can win every time, even against a strong computer, then play the Black side but with Black moving first, and make sure you can draw every time.

    You should be able to work out all the rules very quickly and perhaps some of the tricks. For example triangulation to waste a move - if you are playing a human they will sometimes play too quickly and let you gain the opposition.
  5. Standard member adam warlock
    Baby Gauss
    26 Apr '07 16:10
    Originally posted by Fat Lady
    It's an excellent exercise to start with a white king on e1, a white pawn on e2 and a black king on e8. First play with White and make sure you can win every time, even against a strong computer, then play the Black side but with Black moving first, and make sure you can draw every time.
    Will do that!
  6. Standard member wormwood
    If Theres Hell Below
    26 Apr '07 16:11
    Originally posted by Regicidal
    However, if the setup is white king on the 6th rank, black king on 8th, then white always (except for rook pawns) wins even without the opposition.
    I really like the idea of the key squares in these, just get your king there before your opponent and it's over. no need to make sure you have the opposition, or to think whether the current opposition is 'meaningful' or not. across the board, around obstacles if need be, just blitz your way on any of those sweet three squares and "no earthly power can save your opponent" as karsten müller put it.
  7. Standard member DeepThought
    Losing the Thread
    26 Apr '07 16:14
    Originally posted by Fat Lady
    It's an excellent exercise to start with a white king on e1, a white pawn on e2 and a black king on e8. First play with White and make sure you can win every time, even against a strong computer, then play the Black side but with Black moving first, and make sure you can draw every time.

    You should be able to work out all the rules very quickly and perha ...[text shortened]... f you are playing a human they will sometimes play too quickly and let you gain the opposition.
    Yes, I learnt (and in the meantime forgot - it's complicated and tricky!) the procedure for winning K + B + N vs K by watching and then copying endgame table bases.
  8. 26 Apr '07 16:37
    Originally posted by Regicidal
    However, if the setup is white king on the 6th rank, black king on 8th, then white always (except for rook pawns) wins even without the opposition.
    If whites king is two spaces in front his pawn against a lone king, he can force the promotion of the pawn regardless of opposition. If his pawn is at the 5th rank or beyond and his king is one square in front, he can force the promotion regardless of opposition.
  9. 26 Apr '07 17:08
    Originally posted by zebano
    If whites king is two spaces in front his pawn against a lone king, he can force the promotion of the pawn regardless of opposition. If his pawn is at the 5th rank or beyond and his king is one square in front, he can force the promotion regardless of opposition.
    Precisely.
  10. 26 Apr '07 17:09
    Originally posted by DeepThought
    Yes, I learnt (and in the meantime forgot - it's complicated and tricky!) the procedure for winning K + B + N vs K by watching and then copying endgame table bases.
    Yes I had a time when I tried to learn this...not sure if I could do it now. I think it is an excellent way to learn how to get knight, bishop and king working together. There is something quite beautiful about the final mating net, clamping the king onto the side and forcing it along.

    I don't know if theres an explanation of how to do this somewhere on the web. It's a little to complex to explain here.

    However in "Silmans Complete Endgame Course" he deliberately leaves it out because it's such a rare ending.
  11. 26 Apr '07 18:13


    White to move checkmate in two: to get here the black king had to first be forced to the corner of the opposite colour to the Bishop
  12. 26 Apr '07 18:17 / 1 edit
    Heres the position a few moves earlier:


    It's black to move - white has just moved the knight from e1
  13. Standard member wormwood
    If Theres Hell Below
    26 Apr '07 20:43 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Mahout
    I don't know if theres an explanation of how to do this somewhere on the web. It's a little to complex to explain here.
    I wrote a post on how to do it at some point. don't know if it helps anybody, but here's a link anyway:


    Mating With KNB vs. K
    http://burncastleburn.blogspot.com/2006/12/mating-with-knb-vs-k.html
  14. Standard member Ragnorak
    For RHP addons...
    26 Apr '07 22:31
    Originally posted by Mahout
    I don't know if theres an explanation of how to do this somewhere on the web. It's a little to complex to explain here.
    Here's a thread I wrote on it.
    Thread 32573

    D
  15. Donation richjohnson
    TANSTAAFL
    26 Apr '07 23:38
    Originally posted by DeepThought
    The corrolory to that is that if black has the opposition, and white doesn't have the pawn move then it's a draw. This (nearly) came up in this game Game 3236996, on my last move I played 67. ... Kc6, but I could also have kept the draw with 67. ... Kc8 as after 68. Kb5 I have 68. ... Kb7 and if 68. Kc5 Kc7 and pushing the pawn creates the same end position as in the game but with everything shifted down a rank.
    Another point that should be learned early on in endgame study is that if you can get to a position with a lone K vs K+p, if your opponent's K is behind the p it is a draw. (eg Game 2791376 ) I'm not sure if opposition matters.