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  1. 17 Nov '07 00:24
    How would I go about learning an opening? I've no idea where to start. I know the real basics like control the centre, knights before bishops etc but I always end up in trouble early on against anyone half way decent. Is there a book recommended that runs through openings in general that gives you information on each one. Sort of like a stepping stone before you actually choose an opening.
  2. Standard member bannedplayer306509
    Best Loser
    17 Nov '07 00:26
    Originally posted by Arctic Jack
    How would I go about learning an opening? I've no idea where to start. I know the real basics like control the centre, knights before bishops etc but I always end up in trouble early on against anyone half way decent. Is there a book recommended that runs through openings in general that gives you information on each one. Sort of like a stepping stone before you actually choose an opening.
    You really gotta get in touch with your inner google man 😉.
  3. Standard member Dutch Defense
    Stealer of Souls
    17 Nov '07 00:32
    As white: King's Gambit, Centre Game, English

    As black: Dutch Defense, KID, Modern Defense, Sicilian Defense
  4. Standard member bannedplayer306509
    Best Loser
    17 Nov '07 00:33 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Dutch Defense
    As white: King's Gambit, Centre Game, English

    As black: Dutch Defense, KID, Modern Defense, Sicilian Defense
    White - e4, play a KG if you can. If not just stick to the book. Bg5 is a good move in the Sicilian, don't underestimate it.

    Black - e5 if you can. Otherwise make something up.. most of the mainline openings are sickening 😛.

    edit - and I forgot to mention.. don't listen to dutch.
  5. 17 Nov '07 00:40
    Originally posted by Arctic Jack
    How would I go about learning an opening? I've no idea where to start. I know the real basics like control the centre, knights before bishops etc but I always end up in trouble early on against anyone half way decent. Is there a book recommended that runs through openings in general that gives you information on each one. Sort of like a stepping stone before you actually choose an opening.
    Modern Chess Openings, Nick De Firmian has revised the latest version, it's been around for over a century, called "The chess player's bible" for good reason.
  6. Standard member Dutch Defense
    Stealer of Souls
    17 Nov '07 01:09 / 3 edits
    Originally posted by ih8sens
    I forgot to mention.. don't listen to dutch.
    why?

    I love edits 😀
  7. Standard member Lukerik
    Stick your hands up
    17 Nov '07 01:34
    Copy the people that beat you here. After playing king's pawn openings for more than a decade I switched to the English opening / Sicilian Defence after joining this site and my rating rose from 1400 to 1600. I found wikipaedia quite useful for a bit of light thought behind it. Also if you have Firefox you can get the games explorer addon. Then you get a choice of possible defences. Great stuff. Necessity is the mother of invention they say and I find the best teacher is trying to find an answer to an opening that hammers you. Look for something that refutes whatever they're doing and suites your style.
  8. 17 Nov '07 01:45
    Originally posted by Arctic Jack
    Is there a book recommended that runs through openings in general that gives you information on each one. Sort of like a stepping stone before you actually choose an opening.
    There are. The one I have is called "Chess Openings for the Average Player". Its not a bad book of the type you are looking for, though there are probably better ones out there now. In this one the authors recommend certain openings, which they cover in the most detail, but give you some choice as well. With white they recommend either the Ruy Lopez or Queen's Gambit, with black the Sicilian or French Defence against 1.e4, depending on preference. Against 1. d4 they recommend the Nimzo and Queen's Indian.

    All of the above get a decent amount of attention. The most important variations are explained and typical ideas and positions for both sides are given. Other openings are mentioned as well, but in much less detail. Its not a bad place to start.

    I don't recommend something like MCO or NCO for what you are looking for. They are great for giving the latest theory and all that, but it is just endless variations and very little text other than "black is a little better" but no explanation as to why, or as to what either side is trying to achieve.
  9. 17 Nov '07 02:16
    While you're learning, just use an opening database. If you don't want to download anything, try the online one at shredderchess.com. Just stick to the most popular or highest performance rating move and you won't get into too much trouble (well, probably less than you would just doing it on your own).

    Wikipedia is also a decent general reference for openings. When you're playing an opening that seems interesting, look it up there and you'll be able to find some basic info about it and other references to look up.
  10. 17 Nov '07 02:36
    In several of the games you played you used the classic Q+B to attack f7 for a fool's mate. This will give you some wins, but not take you very far. Each game, after 10-12 moves, look at your position. Do you have 2 Bishops and 2 Knights developed? Has your Queen moved to the 2sd or 3rd rank and are the rooks connected? Have you castled? The tactical aspect of each game is different, but if you can answer "yes" to each of the above questions the odds are good that your position is solid.

    Look for openings that build those solid positions. There are many for both sides that let you enter the middle game with equal material, equal space, and equal opportunities. And that is all that you can ask for in an opening.

    Specifics?

    For white there are 4 perfect opening moves: e4, d4, c4 and N-f3. Each of these can get you to that solid middle game I mentioned above.

    For black consider d5 against e4 and N-f6 against anything else.

    The advice to use the internet is correct. You can find 100's of sites that explain the openings and where you can find the ones that suit you as a player.

    And all of this comes with a big grain of salt. I'm just an average player.

    Best,
    Steve
  11. 17 Nov '07 02:44
    Originally posted by Arctic Jack
    How would I go about learning an opening? I've no idea where to start. I know the real basics like control the centre, knights before bishops etc but I always end up in trouble early on against anyone half way decent. Is there a book recommended that runs through openings in general that gives you information on each one. Sort of like a stepping stone before you actually choose an opening.
    I think this may be what you're looking for...

    How to Build Your Chess Opening Repertoire -- Steve Giddins, Gambit Publications

    from the back cover
    All chess-playres who have progressed beyond beginner level need an opening repertoire. However, there are many different types of repertoire, and dozens of opening to choose between. From novice to grandmaster, a player's basic task when choosing a repertoire is the same: he needs to select opening that suit his playing style and that he can play with confidence. The repertoire should not require more memory work and study than he is capable of, or has time for. In this book, the first to focus on these issues, Steve Giddins provides common-sense guidance on questions such as:
    *Whether to play main lines, offbeat openings or universal systems
    *How to avoid being 'move-ordered'
    *How to use computers
    *If and when to depart from or change your repertoire
    The book is rounded offwith an investigation of the use of role models and a close look at the repertoires of leading players past and present. Steve Giddens is a FIDE Master from England who plays regularly in international events and has frequently contributed tot he British Chess Magazine.This is his second book for Gambit.

    Reviews:
    http://www.chessville.com/reviews/Build_Your_Chess_Opening_Repertoire.htm
    http://www.amazon.com/Build-Your-Chess-Opening-Repertoire/dp/1901983897
    http://www.jeremysilman.com/book_reviews_js/js_ht_build_chess_open_rep.html
  12. 17 Nov '07 09:53
    Giuoco Piano. It develops your pices, many battles for the control of the center, make you understand the value of central pawns, and a perfect battleground for those wanting to learn a new opening. There's a variation you have to avoid which is the Giuoco Pianissimo. You can play the standard 4.c3 intending d4 or play a couple of other lively lines in the GP such as the Evans Gambit. Play can also transpose to the Max Lange.

    My advice, don't play wild openings. Open games are fine, but no garbage openings.
  13. 17 Nov '07 10:05
    Originally posted by Papyn Chase
    Giuoco Piano. It develops your pices, many battles for the control of the center, make you understand the value of central pawns, and a perfect battleground for those wanting to learn a new opening. There's a variation you have to avoid which is the Giuoco Pianissimo. You can play the standard 4.c3 intending d4 or play a couple of other lively lines in t ...[text shortened]... Lange.

    My advice, don't play wild openings. Open games are fine, but no garbage openings.
    zzzz
    😉

    [Event "Club Championship"]
    [Site "Crawley Chess Club"]
    [Date "15.11.2007"]
    [White "S. Collyer"]
    [Black "T. Smith"]
    [Result "1-0"]
    [ECO "B21"]

    1.e4 c5 2.d4 cxd4 3.c3 dxc3 4.Nxc3 g6 5.Nf3 Bg7 6.Bc4 e6 7.e5 Nc6
    8.Qe2 Nge7 9.O-O b6 10.Rd1 Qc7 11.Nb5 Qb8 12.Nd6+ Kf8 13.Bf4 h6
    14.Rac1 Bb7 15.Rc3 Na5 16.Bb5 Bc6 17.b4 a6 18.Bxc6 Naxc6 19.a3 Nd5
    20.Rb3 Nxf4 21.Qe4 Nd5 22.Rxd5 exd5 23.Qxd5 Nd8 24.Nh4 Ne6
    25.Nxf7 Kxf7 26.Qxd7+ Kg8 27.Qxe6+ Kh7 28.Qxg6+ Kg8 29.Rf3 Qc7
    30.g3 Qxe5 31.Qf7+ Kh7 32.Ng6 Rhf8 33.Nxe5 Rxf7 34.Nxf7 Rf8
    35.Kg2 Kg8 36.Nd6 Rd8 37.Nf5 Kh7 38.Re3 Kg6 39.Nxg7 Kxg7
    40.Re7+ Kg6 41.Re6+
    Black resigns
    1-0
  14. Standard member Dragon Fire
    Lord of all beasts
    17 Nov '07 11:43 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Arctic Jack
    How would I go about learning an opening? I've no idea where to start. I know the real basics like control the centre, knights before bishops etc but I always end up in trouble early on against anyone half way decent. Is there a book recommended that runs through openings in general that gives you information on each one. Sort of like a stepping stone before you actually choose an opening.
    Get something like Batsfords Modern Chess Openings.

    It is an encyclopedia of all common and some not so common openings and gives lots of lines with an assessment but no narrative or comments.

    By following openings from there you will get a feeling for those you like when you can purchase a more appropriate specialist book. Meanwhile B-MCO will always be useful for the deviations that everyone plays from time to time and those opening lines you end up in that are less fancied.

    B-MCO is not a beginners book. I can't really advise on one of those.
  15. 17 Nov '07 12:18
    Originally posted by Dragon Fire
    B-MCO is not a beginners book. I can't really advise on one of those.
    http://tinyurl.com/yqejgd
    All a beginner/intermediate needs to select a basic opening repertoire.