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  1. Standard member asromacalcio
    asromacalcio
    10 Jun '08 11:52
    Any tips for improving my chess, simple things, nothing major as there'd be no massive rewards getting from 1029 to 1300 which is where I expect my limit is, on the time I'm prepared to put in. Just a few pointers might be useful.

    Thanks
  2. 10 Jun '08 12:02
    Once you learn all the rules of chess, concentrate on tactics. "Back to Basics: Chess Tactics" by Dan Heisman is good, as is "Winning Chess Tactics" by Yasser Sierawan.
    You also need to learn basic opening principles:
    1) Open with a centre pawn
    2) Make as few pawn moves as possible
    3) Don't bring your queen out early
    4) Castle early - preferably kingside
    5) Plan to take control of the centre
    6) Develop whilst making threats
    7) Try not to move the same piece twice
  3. Standard member wormwood
    If Theres Hell Below
    10 Jun '08 12:08
    Originally posted by asromacalcio
    Any tips for improving my chess, simple things, nothing major as there'd be no massive rewards getting from 1029 to 1300 which is where I expect my limit is, on the time I'm prepared to put in. Just a few pointers might be useful.

    Thanks
    do you know the basic opening principles? and the basic tactical motifs? if not, google them up and make absolutely sure you know them. and then:

    do some tactical problems every day. it's easy, straightforward and you don't need to use a lot of time. just do it daily. it's no different from learning a new language: you'll struggle at it until you start using it daily. but if you keep at it, at some point it all becomes easy.

    http://chess.emrald.net/
  4. 10 Jun '08 14:04 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Squelchbelch
    Once you learn all the rules of chess, concentrate on tactics. "Back to Basics: Chess Tactics" by Dan Heisman is good, as is "Winning Chess Tactics" by Yasser Sierawan.
    You also need to learn basic opening principles:
    1) Open with a centre pawn
    2) Make as few pawn moves as possible
    3) Don't bring your queen out early
    4) Castle early - preferably k ...[text shortened]... ol of the centre
    6) Develop whilst making threats
    7) Try not to move the same piece twice
    I agree with him except for #4; don't castle early because it will tell your opponent where to attack early in the game; castle when you feel is safe, of course don't wait to long either; there may even cases where the king is safer in the middle when the b, or g files are busted open.
    Try to activate all of your pieces; bishops on open files is possible so you can have control of the diagonal; and rooks on the open files too
    Hope this helps
  5. 10 Jun '08 14:16
    Originally posted by Squelchbelch
    1) Open with a centre pawn
    2) Make as few pawn moves as possible
    o no
  6. Standard member wormwood
    If Theres Hell Below
    10 Jun '08 15:22
    Originally posted by AcapaYespada
    I agree with him except for #4; don't castle early because it will tell your opponent where to attack early in the game; castle when you feel is safe, of course don't wait to long either; there may even cases where the king is safer in the middle when the b, or g files are busted open.
    Try to activate all of your pieces; bishops on open files is possible so you can have control of the diagonal; and rooks on the open files too
    Hope this helps
    for a 1000-player it's by far safer to castle early than delay it. learning to walk before trying to run. -delaying it will introduce all kinds of nuances which will get him mated very soon if he doesn't get them exactly right.
  7. 10 Jun '08 15:33 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by wormwood
    for a 1000-player it's by far safer to castle early than delay it. learning to walk before trying to run. -delaying it will introduce all kinds of nuances which will get him mated very soon if he doesn't get them exactly right.
    You got a point; however he'll be better off knowing the fact of castling too early may cause problems; otherwise in the future he'll get used to castle early and encounter problems in the future when he plays against higher rating people. Anyway I'm sure he'll realize that after castling too early many times.
    I think it will be better if he learns to crawl (basics) before trying to walk(play) since one can get discouraged and give up the game.
  8. Standard member Ragnorak
    For RHP addons...
    10 Jun '08 15:55
    Originally posted by AcapaYespada
    You got a point; however he'll be better off knowing the fact of castling too early may cause problems; otherwise in the future he'll get used to castle early and encounter problems in the future when he plays against higher rating people. Anyway I'm sure he'll realize that after castling too early many times.
    I think it will be better if he learns to ...[text shortened]... awl (basics) before trying to walk(play) since one can get discouraged and give up the game.
    For every general principle in chess, there are occasions to ignore the principle.

    Every piece of advice given should be read with an implied "... in general" tagged on.

    I think that developing in the opening with the idea of castling as soon as possible is good advice to a 1000 rated player. ... in general.

    D
  9. 10 Jun '08 16:03
    Do follow the advice to learn and practice basic endings and tactics. To get to grips with the basic principles of opening play I recommend:

    "Discovering Chess Openings"

    by John Emms (Everyman Chess)

    The sub-title is - "building opening skills from basic priciples" and this is what it does in a very clear and easy to follow way. It explains why moves such as 1.a4 are not so good and takes you through the "schoolboys mate" and how to refute it...and it explains the reasons behind the principles such as why there is a rule "knights before bishops" as well as when the rules might not apply.
  10. 10 Jun '08 16:05
    Originally posted by Ragnorak
    For every general principle in chess, there are occasions to ignore the principle.

    Every piece of advice given should be read with an implied "... in general" tagged on.

    I think that developing in the opening with the idea of castling as soon as possible is good advice to a 1000 rated player. ... in general.

    D
    Exactly.
    How many times have you seen 1000's ask for advice, then looked through their games & they have contradicted those simple opening principles.
    Many times they get mated after not castling & having made too many pawn moves whilst neglecting development & king safety.

    Get some say in the centre, develop pieces & get your king safe all as quickly as possible & you can't go far wrong.
    Let your 1100 rated opponent push pawns around for the first half-dozen moves & see how far it gets them!

    Of course these rules have exceptions - that's a given. If for instance you can gain material early on then obviously you should do that.
  11. 10 Jun '08 16:49
    Originally posted by Squelchbelch
    Exactly.
    How many times have you seen 1000's ask for advice, then looked through their games & they have contradicted those simple opening principles.
    Many times they get mated after not castling & having made too many pawn moves whilst neglecting development & king safety.

    Get some say in the centre, develop pieces & get your king safe all ...[text shortened]... s a given. If for instance you can gain material early on then obviously you should do that.
    MMMhhh yes but...I find it's not always so easy to play against a pawn pusher. On the occasions it's happened I've won but there was usually a point - not long after achieving my ideal set up - that I had to really work out how to undermine the opponents position. Once I'd broken out it was pretty straight forward but I did have to think.
  12. 10 Jun '08 17:33 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Mahout
    MMMhhh yes but...I find it's not always so easy to play against a pawn pusher. On the occasions it's happened I've won but there was usually a point - not long after achieving my ideal set up - that I had to really work out how to undermine the opponents position. Once I'd broken out it was pretty straight forward but I did have to think.
    Playing pawn-pushers can be awkward & you do have to bend the rules a bit & push in return, but only to keep your development options open.
    I don't push for pushing's sake as here Game 4560949 5...h6 prevents the move 6.Ng5, 6...d6 opens up my light square bishop, which proves to be a key piece in this game. 9...a6 allows my dark square bishop a retreat, whilst maintaining it's gaze over the g1/a7 diagonal.
    Many of White's pawn pushes systematically weakened his position.
    For instance, 5.h3 looks a bit premature in this line of the two-knights defence, 5.Nc3 or 5.0-0 look more natural.
    6.c3 stops the queen's knight developing to his most natural square & 7.b4/b5 a4/a5 looks like a very unsound venture. Yes White is gaining space, but by this stage I already have one more piece developed.
    Then the final couple of pushes which result in a losing error.
    13.d4 allows me to take on e4 then 14.dxe5?...Bxf2+ & White is in serious trouble.
    Up to this point White had made 11 pawn moves in the first 14 & Black made only 5.
  13. 10 Jun '08 17:54
    Originally posted by wormwood
    do you know the basic opening principles? and the basic tactical motifs? if not, google them up and make absolutely sure you know them. and then:

    do some tactical problems every day. it's easy, straightforward and you don't need to use a lot of time. just do it daily. it's no different from learning a new language: you'll struggle at it until you start u ...[text shortened]... daily. but if you keep at it, at some point it all becomes easy.

    http://chess.emrald.net/
    This site would be alot better if it explained why their move is better than yours on many occasions.

    Often I see the error when I mess up, but there are puzzles that I completely disagree with the move they make and spending 5-10 minutes doesn't reveal why their move is 'better'.
  14. Standard member Ragnorak
    For RHP addons...
    10 Jun '08 20:01
    Originally posted by tamuzi
    This site would be alot better if it explained why their move is better than yours on many occasions.

    Often I see the error when I mess up, but there are puzzles that I completely disagree with the move they make and spending 5-10 minutes doesn't reveal why their move is 'better'.
    Look at your puzzle history, and each puzzle has a page along with user comments, engine analysis, etc.

    D
  15. 10 Jun '08 20:02
    Well that is just the problem, you have to go through so many clicks and links and on slow internet thats bad. It could be made so much more user friendly by just including said comments on the solution page.