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  1. 10 Mar '12 16:21
    Which chess books for you were the most instructive? In my experience, the game collections of Botvinnik and Smyslov did more for me than Fischer's 60MG.
  2. Standard member Thabtos
    I am become Death
    11 Mar '12 01:51
    Yusupov's instructional series. The first three books are supposed to be for players around 1500, and some of the lessons are on that level like basic opposition in pawn endgames...then there are some lessons that 2000's don't know yet.
  3. 11 Mar '12 02:26
    Zo leer je goed schaken,volume 1 & 2,Max Euwe.

    English language probably My best games of chess 1908-1937,Alekhine
  4. Standard member kingshill
    Mr Ring Rusty
    11 Mar '12 11:55
    Originally posted by dsmichel
    Which chess books for you were the most instructive? In my experience, the game collections of Botvinnik and Smyslov did more for me than Fischer's 60MG.
    This most instructive books will depend on many factors

    Your
    * rating
    * current state of your opening, middlegame and endgame
    * How much effort/time you are willing to invest

    When I was about 1700 I read through My System by Nimzovitch. This and some extra general work on my game saw me improve about 200 point in a year.

    Most of the ideas are antiquated now and sometime incorrect but it definitely made me think.
  5. 11 Mar '12 12:17
    Originally posted by kingshill

    When I was about 1700 I read through My System by Nimzovitch. This and some extra general work on my game saw me improve about 200 point in a year.

    Most of the ideas are antiquated now and sometime incorrect but it definitely made me think.
    My System is a good choice and well worth reading. I'd be interested to know which parts did you thought were outdated.

    When I first started studying chess I found Irving Chernev's "Logical Chess Move by Move" really helpful. It annotates almost every move, even mulling over why a player might favour e4 as opposed to d4. My favourites were the rapid attacks by Pillsbury and the slow squeezes by Capablanca.

    Also "Blunders and Brilliancies" is a great book as well if you can get a copy. I may self-publish my own book one day - and name it "Blunders" ;-)
  6. 11 Mar '12 12:29 / 1 edit
    I liked Reti's, Masters of the chessboard and Modern Ideas in chess, i dont think it did
    anything actually for my chess strength but the latter is one of the few chess books I
    enjoyed enough to read again.
  7. 11 Mar '12 13:18
    Originally posted by kingshill
    This most instructive books will depend on many factors

    Your
    * rating
    * current state of your opening, middlegame and endgame
    * How much effort/time you are willing to invest

    When I was about 1700 I read through My System by Nimzovitch. This and some extra general work on my game saw me improve about 200 point in a year.

    Most of the ideas are antiquated now and sometime incorrect but it definitely made me think.
    Similarly, I've mentioned before that I really got a lot out of Watson's "Secrets of Modern Chess Strategy - Advances since Nimzowitsch" and its follow-up, but some players have complained that they found this book very opaque. I'm sure this is a good example of a book for "somewhat advanced players".

    I also really like Shirov's Fire on the Board books - I got a lot out of these, too. I've also heard a lot of players say some version of "They are great games, but I didn't really understand them", so its probably another set of books that what you get out of it really depends on your overall chess development.
  8. 11 Mar '12 15:56 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by dsmichel
    Which chess books for you were the most instructive? In my experience, the game collections of Botvinnik and Smyslov did more for me than Fischer's 60MG.
    Before one dives in chess games collections, they should go through some books about strategy and endings. Most think endings are boring and they prefer games from data bases, but that is what makes the difference between a patzer and a decent player: good play in endings and knowing some principles of positional chess.

    There are myriads of books on that subjects, but I will recommend
    Averbach´s books about endings
    Vukovic´s book "Art of Attack in Chess"
    Vukovic´s "Chess Sacrfice"
    and about positional play
    Drazen Marovic´s "Secret of Positional Chess".

    Regarding chess games collections, Anatoly Karpov's book from 1980 and something "My best games" (in Russian) is very useful for positional play.

    No use (only) in fast replay grandmasters' games
  9. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    11 Mar '12 19:54
    Every time I read a book by John Nunn, I learn something. Sometimes I relearn it, in that reading Nunn at times recalibrates my thinking and regrounds my approach to the game.
  10. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    11 Mar '12 22:30
    Originally posted by Paul Leggett
    Every time I read a book by John Nunn, I learn something. Sometimes I relearn it, in that reading Nunn at times recalibrates my thinking and regrounds my approach to the game.
    Yep, their is Nunn like him! I have a book of his games, very deeply annotated.
  11. 11 Mar '12 23:25
    As was already said, it all depends on your level of play.

    For players who are not absolute beginners but still have a lot to learn, I would say that The Amateur's Mind by Jeremy Silman is a good starting point.

    The Art of Logical Thinking by Neil McDonald is another book I found very instructive. It is a move by move study of 30 grandmaster games. Though the comments for the very first moves get a little repetitive.
  12. 13 Mar '12 18:23
    I found Euwe's book, the first volume, to be most instructive

    Max Euwe and H. Kramer. The Middlegame.
  13. 13 Mar '12 18:42
    Chernev's "Logical Chess Move By Move" is also one of my favourite instructive books
  14. 15 Mar '12 13:31
    Originally posted by w0lver1ne
    For players who are not absolute beginners but still have a lot to learn, I would say that The Amateur's Mind by Jeremy Silman is a good starting point.
    I found this a lot more enlightening than Silman's other books. I don't think it made me a better chess player, but at least it explained why I'm not a better chess player.

    Richard
  15. Subscriber joesheppe
    Lesser Poobah
    15 Mar '12 19:25
    (older) -- John Nunn: Chess Move by Move (Amazon for $7. or $8. U.S. used)
    (newer) -- Colin Crouch: Modern Chess Move by Move

    Both are very good. Still working my way through Colin's, but Nunn's book was memorable: well-written and good production values.
    I would also recommend one of many good tomes out on endgames. Glenn Flear's series is a good read. That is, the layout is fun. Endgame reading needs to be fun, eh?