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  1. 03 Sep '08 05:28 / 1 edit
    The kings gambit is one of the only openings that I know absolutely nothing about. I have always stayed away from it because I don't really understand it. What is the best way to approach learning it? It just seems to me like it is very complicated and if you don't know what you are doing then you are likely to find yourself in trap. I would appreciate any thoughts...

    By the way, who knew there were so many gambits?: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_chess_gambits
  2. Standard member Wulebgr
    Angler
    03 Sep '08 06:15
    The King's Gambit is a classical nineteenth century opening. It aims for a direct assault on f7 and the Black monarch. Since folks know how to defend these days, and don't simply fall apart in the first few moves, the King's Gambit gives White a strong center, but with compensating weaknesses that Black can attempt to exploit. Sometimes it's the White king that gets trapped in the center.
  3. 03 Sep '08 06:23 / 2 edits
    Yeah I find that moving the f pawn (on either side) drastically weakens the kings defenses (assuming they castled kingside). This only applies in the opening (for me at least), and in the middle game after there have been multiple exchanges I find it is ok to move the f pawn. Would it be better to 0-0-0 in the KG?

    Edit: actually I feel that moving the f pawn hinders the kings safety if they 0-0 or not. An extreme example: 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 f6? 3.Nxe5 fxe5? 4.Qh5!
  4. 03 Sep '08 06:42
    Originally posted by timmydoza
    Yeah I find that moving the f pawn (on either side) drastically weakens the kings defenses (assuming they castled kingside). This only applies in the opening (for me at least), and in the middle game after there have been multiple exchanges I find it is ok to move the f pawn. Would it be better to 0-0-0 in the KG?

    Edit: actually I feel that moving the ...[text shortened]... the kings safety if they 0-0 or not. An extreme example: 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 f6? 3.Nxe5 fxe5? 4.Qh5!
    If you aren't prepared to sacrifice a little king safety for good attacking chances, central control & a superior pawn structure in the endgame, then I guess the KG really isn't for you.
  5. 03 Sep '08 07:13
    Originally posted by Squelchbelch
    If you aren't prepared to sacrifice a little king safety for good attacking chances, central control & a superior pawn structure in the endgame, then I guess the KG really isn't for you.
    Thats why I'm asking. How do I learn to sacrifice 'a little king safety for good attacking chances, central control & a superior pawn structure in the endgame'? Please help me instead of just saying "I guess the KG really isn't for you."
  6. 03 Sep '08 07:19
    Originally posted by timmydoza
    Thats why I'm asking. How do I learn to sacrifice 'a little king safety for good attacking chances, central control & a superior pawn structure in the endgame'? Please help me instead of just saying "I guess the KG really isn't for you."
    You seem to be doing just fine in your games anyway - why would you wish to alter your opening repertoire?
  7. 03 Sep '08 07:21
    Originally posted by timmydoza
    Thats why I'm asking. How do I learn to sacrifice 'a little king safety for good attacking chances, central control & a superior pawn structure in the endgame'? Please help me instead of just saying "I guess the KG really isn't for you."
    Well to answer your question about 0-0-0, in most instances this would take too long in an opening where time is of the essence... you need to be quick.. but there is always exceptions to the rule. If you read the thread about the bangiev method you will understand that this opening is an attack on the f7 square although that is already known without this method.. the whole point of 2.f4 is to open the f-file then 0-0 to move the king to semi-safety and move the rook onto the hopefully open f-file.
  8. Standard member Dragon Fire
    Lord of all beasts
    03 Sep '08 07:21
    Originally posted by timmydoza
    Yeah I find that moving the f pawn (on either side) drastically weakens the kings defenses (assuming they castled kingside). This only applies in the opening (for me at least), and in the middle game after there have been multiple exchanges I find it is ok to move the f pawn. Would it be better to 0-0-0 in the KG?

    Edit: actually I feel that moving the ...[text shortened]... the kings safety if they 0-0 or not. An extreme example: 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 f6? 3.Nxe5 fxe5? 4.Qh5!
    0-0 is much more common in the KG than 0-0-0.

    Often white will play Kf1 and even play 0-0 after h4 and g3.

    Strange, I know! Whites King can get into some strange positions but with accurate play white attacking chances more than compensate for this perceived Kings weaknesses.

    The KG is not busted as many would have you believe but is playable by white at all levels and gives a sharp, open, tactical game. There is no such thing as a closed KGA and tactical ability far outweigh strategic considerations. In fact it is for this latter reason than you must choose your opponents carefully. You cannot out think Fritz or Rybka as white or black in a KGA so if you think you might be playing an engine avoid and play a Guico Piano instead.
  9. 03 Sep '08 07:21 / 2 edits
    @ squelch: Just curious. I like to be versatile. Also, what if I'm faced with the KG as black?

    @ everybody else: Thanks. Even though it may be obvious to some it never occurred to me that the rook is aimed right at f7 after 0-0. Very interesting...
  10. Standard member paultopia
    High Priest
    03 Sep '08 10:11
    Hmm... as one of the local KG freaks, I should probably chime in here. :-)

    RE: 0-0-0: Don't dis it too hard. One of my secret (no longer) weapons is 0-0-0 as white in the KG against the Fisher defense. This is because I think the one major glitch in the Fisher defense is that black spends all day pushing those kingside pawns to hold onto the f pawn -- which is nice if white's king is underneath that barrage, but not so nice if white's on the other side of the board, and controls the center.


    TO THE OP: don't fear the KG, really. I think the easiest way to get a handle on it is to glance over a few games in each of the major variations -- which I see as the Cunningham, the Kieseritzky, the Muzio, the Fisher, and Abbazia/Falkbeer. Once you get a sense of how the games in each of those variations go, you'll probably realize whether the opening might be for you.
  11. 03 Sep '08 10:44
    The whole point of the KG is opening the f-file and sacrifice. If you are not prepared to sacrifice pieces like a madman, the KG is not for you.

    A feature that returns often in KG is an exchange sacrifice on f6.
  12. 03 Sep '08 10:49 / 1 edit
    5 minutes blitz win.

  13. Standard member ivan2908
    SelfProclaimedTitler
    03 Sep '08 10:50 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by timmydoza
    The kings gambit is one of the only openings that I know absolutely nothing about. I have always stayed away from it because I don't really understand it. What is the best way to approach learning it? It just seems to me like it is very complicated and if you don't know what you are doing then you are likely to find yourself in trap. I would appreciate ...[text shortened]... way, who knew there were so many gambits?: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_chess_gambits
    I would give this advice : go for it. I think that for every improving chess player a phase in his chess life when he tries to play all agressive sharp lines can not do harm (KG, traxler, dragon etc.).

    It teaches you how to rid yourself of materialistic dogma, it teaches you the value of initiative.
    It forces you to be accurate tactically, because every tempo is very important, if not crucial and accuracy is the virtue of a chess player whenever open later you might play.

    Personally I made a big jump since I started to play sharp lines.

    If after that I switch again to quiet positional openings it doesn't matter, I have one experience more and I can apply that there too.



    Read the wikipedia KG article, learn the main variations, play a few games against weaker opposition (1200-1500) and when you get confident start to use it regulary against all opponents.

    There is a lot of stronger players then me here who can give you more ideas but I think my advice is pretty sound
  14. 03 Sep '08 11:19 / 1 edit
    More KG blitz mayhem from a 1500 blitzer.

  15. 03 Sep '08 11:30
    But the Smith-Morra, now that's a real gambit!