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  1. 03 Aug '11 13:10
    Looking to extend my chess library.
    If you know a chess book you consider a must-read,please mention it here.
    It doesn't matter if it's out of print.
    No opening books,zero interest in those.

    Thanks.
  2. Standard member pdunne
    Badmaster
    03 Aug '11 14:49
    Well, you don't say what you already have, so it's a bit hit and miss. Here's a list off the top of my head, focusing on enjoyment rather than study.

    Dr. Tarrasch, 300 Games of Chess
    Dr. Tarrasch, die moderne Schachpartie (has it been translated? don't know)
    ANY/ALL of Dr. Tarrasch's tournament books: Nürnberg 1896, Ostende 1907, St. Peterburg 1914
    ...
    [right! Thats' enough Tarrasch! --ed.]

    A. J. Roycroft, Test Tube Chess
    guaranteed to make you like endgame studies!

    Yermolinksy, The Road to Chess Improvement
    don't know if it'll help anyone under "candidate master" to get better, but a marvellous read

    Averbakh, Chess Tactics for Advanced Players
    very illuminating; by far the best book I've read about tactics (as opposed to books of positions to solve)

    Hoffman, King's Gambit
    No, not an opening book! A book about chess rather than a chess book. Uneven, but very good in places.

    Marshall, My Fifty Years of Chess
    A fellow who really loved chess, and it shows in the way he writes about it. Great games too.
  3. 03 Aug '11 15:35
    My Best Games as White - Victor Korchnoi
    My Best Games as Black - Victor Korchnoi
  4. 03 Aug '11 15:41
    Any video recos? I think there are lot of videos out there. I have read reviews of some. I feel videos add much more value though no experience yet.
  5. 03 Aug '11 15:53 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by pdunne
    Well, you don't say what you already have, so it's a bit hit and miss. Here's a list off the top of my head, focusing on enjoyment rather than study.

    Dr. Tarrasch, 300 Games of Chess
    Dr. Tarrasch, die moderne Schachpartie (has it been translated? don't know)
    ANY/ALL of Dr. Tarrasch's tournament books: Nürnberg 1896, Ostende 1907, St. Peterburg 1914
    .. ho really loved chess, and it shows in the way he writes about it. Great games too.
    Well,I own +-300 books (though a lot of garbage),it would take me a while to compile a list while it's easy for everyone to just mention a few they liked

    They don't need to be instructional.History,biographies,whatever,it's all good.Just no openings.

    To my knowledge Die Moderne Schachpartie has not been translated.A crime if you ask me,specially considering the crap that does get published.I have the German edition Ölms.

    Thanks for the other suggestions.

    Forgot to mention,the books can be in the English,Dutch,German and French language.
    English notation is no problem either.
  6. 03 Aug '11 16:15
    I highly recommend "Improve Your chess now". I wrote a review here http://www.passionforchess.com/blog/54/book-review-improve-your-chess-now/
  7. Standard member bill718
    Enigma
    03 Aug '11 17:33
    Originally posted by torten
    Looking to extend my chess library.
    If you know a chess book you consider a must-read,please mention it here.
    It doesn't matter if it's out of print.
    No opening books,zero interest in those.

    Thanks.
    2 old books you may consider:

    1. 500 Master Games of Chess - Tartakower

    2. My System - Nimzovich

    Those old dogs still know how to hunt!

  8. 05 Aug '11 04:30
    Bobby Fischer Goes to War is a fascinating book about Bobby Fischer and the 1972 World Championship match. Searching for Bobby Fischer is an interesting memoir from a chess parent and especially interesting for those (like me) who've had extensive interactions with the American scholastic chess world. Silman's Complete Endgame Course is one of the best endgame books out there for anyone below master level. Josh Waitzkin's The Art of Learning isn't strictly about chess, but rather the life lessons and psychological lessons that chess (and martial arts) teaches.
  9. 10 Aug '11 21:27
    Thanks all for the contributions
  10. Standard member nimzo5
    Ronin
    10 Aug '11 22:26
    Improve your chess now is an enjoyable book- a pity Tisdall never wrote another.
  11. 11 Aug '11 00:32
    Simple Chess by Michael Stean. His way of explaining positional aspects, and his chosen examples, I found to be really instructive
  12. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    11 Aug '11 05:35
    Originally posted by Varenka
    Simple Chess by Michael Stean. His way of explaining positional aspects, and his chosen examples, I found to be really instructive
    I second the motion on this one. A brilliant and underrated book.

    John Emms also did a more modern version of the approach in two books, Simple Chess and More Simple Chess, and they are excellent and worthy tributes to Stean's original work, which Emms admires and intentionally tries to emulate.
  13. 11 Aug '11 10:39
    The problem, as I experience it, is not choosing good books (there are so many), but rather getting the endurance to finish them... That's the tough part!
  14. 11 Aug '11 20:57
    Originally posted by Eternal Student
    The problem, as I experience it, is not choosing good books (there are so many), but rather getting the endurance to finish them... That's the tough part!
    buy only thin ones
  15. 16 Aug '11 07:28
    Originally posted by torten
    buy only thin ones
    I've seen, as no doubt you have also, many a "thin" chess book heavy with annotations... Just off the top of my head, take Keene's Flank Openings...