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  1. Standard member wittywonka
    Chocolate Expert
    06 Feb '10 23:58
    A couple of years ago, I was a pretty good player both on the board and on PTIG (~1800), but as you can tell I am no longer playing at that same level. In short, I signed up for a tournament the first week of April, and I was hoping for specific suggestions for how to improve to about that same level (or better) in that period of time. Please do keep in mind that I am a high school senior with a pretty crazy course load; I would imagine I could set aside something like thirty minutes a night.
  2. 07 Feb '10 00:14 / 1 edit
    I never prepped for tourneys.Is it even possible to do so?
    Why not stick to your normal routine?

    edit: can I have some chocolate?
  3. Subscriber no1marauder
    Humble and Kind
    07 Feb '10 00:24
    Originally posted by wittywonka
    A couple of years ago, I was a pretty good player both on the board and on PTIG (~1800), but as you can tell I am no longer playing at that same level. In short, I signed up for a tournament the first week of April, and I was hoping for specific suggestions for how to improve to about that same level (or better) in that period of time. Please do keep in ...[text shortened]... etty crazy course load; I would imagine I could set aside something like thirty minutes a night.
    Does your high school have a chess club? The best way to prepare for an OTB tourney is to play OTB games, preferable against players about your level or slightly better. Keep score and then analyze the games with a good player if possible or with an engine.
  4. Standard member wittywonka
    Chocolate Expert
    07 Feb '10 00:45
    Originally posted by no1marauder
    Does your high school have a chess club?
    Not exactly, but I might be able to get some games started between now and then. They definitely wouldn't be on a regular basis, though.
  5. 07 Feb '10 01:46
    Hi Witty.

    "I could set aside something like thirty minutes a night."

    That is just about enough time to set up the pieces,
    make a cup of tea and put the pieces away again.

    As suggested, stick to your routine and get a good sleep
    the night before the tournament.

    Good Luck.
  6. 07 Feb '10 02:14
    Here is a GOOD way - play through a master game and stop at the end of the theory (but before either side has a clear advantage), set the position up on a board and then stare at it for 10-20 minutes and plan out what sort of possibilities lie waiting for both sides and then how you might preceed (for example, what long term weaknesses could be exploited in the pawn structures or whether there are any loose pieces that might be able to be made the subject of a tactical plan or whether you are actually needing to be more safety conscious and prevent your opponent for executing any deadly threats against your own force)

    After this, check on the real game and see how it went to find out if your ideas were on the right lines or not.

    This is a good way to improve mental visualisation - probably the most important skill in real life chess where we cannot move the pieces around and see clearly what the position will be like afterwards...
  7. 07 Feb '10 03:12
    Best way to improve quickly is a montage
    YouTube
  8. Standard member orion25
    Art is hard
    07 Feb '10 11:10
    Never having played any OTB tourny and rarely playing OTB at all, it seems to me it might be a good idea to know very well what you are going to play as white and as black, and then check out master games featuring those openings.
  9. 07 Feb '10 12:09
    Originally posted by mcreynolds
    Best way to improve quickly is a montage
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W8xHjC27YvM
    Your suggestion is two months chopping wood in Siberia?

    That might actually work
  10. Standard member wittywonka
    Chocolate Expert
    07 Feb '10 19:10
    Alright, seeing as I'm getting responses of mixed levels of seriousness and utility, let me phrase it this way: how would my time best be spent among the following?

    1) Working through tactics puzzles
    2) Working through checkmate puzzles
    3) Locking down my opening sequences
    4) Reviewing some GM games
    5) Playing real-time (OTB or online) games
    6) Other

    How would you rank these, in terms of being the most useful strategy/strategies for preparing?
  11. Standard member orion25
    Art is hard
    07 Feb '10 20:05
    5-3-4
  12. 07 Feb '10 23:11
    A good nights sleep,
    Tuna sandwitches,
    1 Pint of cider,
    Ear plugs,
    Pencil,
    er.....thats it.
  13. 07 Feb '10 23:21
    Originally posted by Ajuin
    Your suggestion is two months chopping wood in Siberia?

    That might actually work
    Only when you can wade through 100 metres of 4 foot deep snow in under a minute.
  14. 08 Feb '10 00:40
    1- Buy fritz

    2- Get a blueprint of the tournament area

    2- Devise a master plan to use fritz during your games



    works every time
  15. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    08 Feb '10 03:26
    Read the "Endgame Advice From Greenpawn" thread.

    Paul