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  1. 14 Mar '08 11:17
    Guys, do you need to notify for a queen capture as you do with a king?
  2. 14 Mar '08 11:28
    Originally posted by colonel dax
    Guys, do you need to notify for a queen capture as you do with a king?
    Actually chess etiquette is to not notify if the opponents king is in check, because by notifying them you are apparently insulting their intelligence. To answer you question no you don't need to let your opponent know that you are attacking their queen.
  3. 14 Mar '08 11:35
    Ok, so at the same time, if they go to make a move and they dont see their queen in danger, I dont need to tell them right?
  4. Subscriber AttilaTheHorn
    Erro Ergo Sum
    14 Mar '08 12:00
    Originally posted by tomtom232
    Actually chess etiquette is to not notify if the opponents king is in check, because by notifying them you are apparently insulting their intelligence. To answer you question no you don't need to let your opponent know that you are attacking their queen.
    The real reason for not announcing check is that it's against the rules, because you are not allowed to say anything to your opponent. The only time you can speak is to offer a draw or resign. Otherwise, you must not say anything at all or act in a way that might disturb or annoy your opponent. All this is covered in the rules of chess.
  5. 14 Mar '08 12:06
    Originally posted by AttilaTheHorn
    The only time you can speak is to offer a draw or resign.
    The only time you can speak is to offer a draw or resign or to say "j'adaube" or equivalent with cause.
  6. 14 Mar '08 12:31
    Originally posted by AttilaTheHorn
    The real reason for not announcing check is that it's against the rules, because you are not allowed to say anything to your opponent. The only time you can speak is to offer a draw or resign. Otherwise, you must not say anything at all or act in a way that might disturb or annoy your opponent. All this is covered in the rules of chess.
    I've never played chess under strict FIDE rules, so I'm not familiar with how FIDE arbiters interpret the "announcing check" issue. Maybe Attila and Fabian have a better handle on FIDE rules than myself. However, I will say that I checked the FIDE rules on the FIDE web site, and I couldn't find any rule that specifically addresses the issue of announcing check.

    Here in the USA, the USCF rules do address the issue.

    USCF Rule 12F: "Calling Check Not Mandatory. - Announcing check is not required, and is rare in high-level tournaments. It is the responsibility of the opponent to notice the check, and a player who does not may suffer serious consequences. A player may announce check."

    I'm told that in USCF tournaments with young scholastic players, it's fairly common for them to announce check. However, in most adult USCF tournaments, the players will get irritated if their opponent announces check, because they are good enough to know that check has been given. So in these adult tournaments, check is almost never announced.
  7. 14 Mar '08 18:47
    Originally posted by colonel dax
    Guys, do you need to notify for a queen capture as you do with a king?
    So to conclude. You don't need to announce a check on the king (or a checkmate); indeed the rules prohibit it. And as for announcing an attack on the queen, no absolutely not ever.
  8. 14 Mar '08 19:14 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Policestate
    So to conclude. You don't need to announce a check on the king (or a checkmate); indeed the rules prohibit it. And as for announcing an attack on the queen, no absolutely not ever.
    What I was trying to point out by quoting USCF Rule 12F is that if you are playing under USCF rules, you are not prohibited from announcing check. Of course, I have no idea if colonel dax is in the USA.

    Edit - Also, if there's any FIDE rule or arbiter interpretation that specifically prevents a player from announcing check, nobody has pointed it out to me.
  9. Standard member Lukerik
    Stick your hands up
    14 Mar '08 19:52
    I was leafing through a very interesting history of the game the other day and apparently when the Queen first assumed her modern artillery-like moves it was customary to announce her endangerment as it is with the King nowadays during informal games. Don't think this has been done for some several hundred years though.
  10. 14 Mar '08 20:18 / 1 edit
    My father complained that I didn't say "gardez la dame" when I attacked his queen and he didn't see it... That didn't keep me from taking it.
  11. 14 Mar '08 20:20
    Originally posted by Lukerik
    I was leafing through a very interesting history of the game the other day and apparently when the Queen first assumed her modern artillery-like moves it was customary to announce her endangerment as it is with the King nowadays during informal games. Don't think this has been done for some several hundred years though.
    Hm, my father isn't that old...
  12. Standard member JonathanB of London
    Curb Your Enthusiasm
    14 Mar '08 22:01
    Originally posted by Nordlys
    ... That didn't keep me from taking it.
    Quite right too :-)
  13. 14 Mar '08 22:16
    Originally posted by Nordlys
    My father complained that I didn't say "gardez la dame" when I attacked his queen and he didn't see it... That didn't keep me from taking it.
    Its a sad day when you beat your father at chess.
  14. 14 Mar '08 22:19
    What a strange custom! Why not warn an opponent of any hanging piece! I am glad that rule is not still in place, it should be up to your opponent to spot these kind of threats, nothing except a check should ever be announced really imo.
  15. 14 Mar '08 22:27
    Originally posted by Nordlys
    My father complained that I didn't say "gardez la dame" when I attacked his queen and he didn't see it... That didn't keep me from taking it.
    Did he complain when you didn't say "Gardez your rook?" or knight or even "Gardez your pion"?