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  1. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    24 Sep '09 01:18
    Hi folks,

    This is a question about which I have mixed feelings, and I am curious about what others think.

    I am currently a piece up in a game that I expect to win without much effort. My opponent continues to play (which I am cool with, as he has every right to test my technique), but he has now slowed down to the minimum of one move a day allowed by our time control, even though he is banging out multiple moves on all his other games daily.

    My impression (and it is just an impression, so I could be wrong), is that he is hoping I will miss a move and and allow him towin on time. The fact that he has won almost 20% of his games on time (some 120+ games on time) adds some credence to my theory.

    This is cleary a legal strategy, and it is probably his only hope. Is this sporting? I understand that much of this question is contingent on why we play and what motivates us, but I am curious to know what other players think.

    Paul Leggett
    http://discountchess.110mb.com/
  2. 24 Sep '09 02:04
    I had an opponent like that once. Since then I always check my opponents' records before the second move is done, especially subscribers!

    They have unlimited games so they can let games drag on as long as they like without them taking up limited slots. I think it's a flaw in this site's system but I don't know how to remedy it.
  3. Standard member wittywonka
    Chocolate Expert
    24 Sep '09 02:10
    Good sportsmanship? No.

    Allowed? Yes.

    Unfortunately, therefore, there's not really anything you can do about it unless you decide that you'd like never to hear from him again (ignore list).
  4. Standard member wormwood
    If Theres Hell Below
    24 Sep '09 02:34
    that's an integral aspect in playing 1-day games. probably most of people who play them are partly hoping for scoring some timeout wins. because let's face it, a correspondence chess site is not where you go for playing 'fast' games.
  5. 24 Sep '09 02:48
    Originally posted by Paul Leggett
    Hi folks,

    This is a question about which I have mixed feelings, and I am curious about what others think.

    I am currently a piece up in a game that I expect to win without much effort. My opponent continues to play (which I am cool with, as he has every right to test my technique), but he has now slowed down to the minimum of one move a day allowe ...[text shortened]... I am curious to know what other players think.

    Paul Leggett
    http://discountchess.110mb.com/
    Don't let it rattle you. Just keep moving and crush his azz.
  6. Subscriber AttilaTheHorn
    Erro Ergo Sum
    24 Sep '09 05:14
    >That's one of the advantages of being a subscriber: you don't care if an opponent does that. If you're not a subscriber, such an opponent takes up valuable space on your 6-game limit, and is a real pain in the neck. He's allowed to do it because it's within the rules, but he can't be much of a sportsman.
    >As a subscriber, I can just wait him out.
  7. 24 Sep '09 06:57
    Originally posted by Paul Leggett


    Paul Leggett
    http://discountchess.110mb.com/
    Well it can't be much worse than advertising your chess site on another chess site.
  8. 24 Sep '09 08:36
    Oh excuse me. I thought it was a rival chess site. Sorry.
  9. 24 Sep '09 09:59
    I confess I have a tendency to do the slowing down thing.
    In the opening, or if I'm clearly winning and there's no complications, its easy to bang out a move.
    If the position is complicated, then I'll log in several times and have a look, and think about it in the meantime.

    Maybe something like this is going on for your opponent.

    That said, if a position is lost-lost with no possibility of a swindle or counterplay, then I'll resign it.

    Phil.
  10. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    24 Sep '09 11:14
    Originally posted by MrPhil
    I confess I have a tendency to do the slowing down thing.
    In the opening, or if I'm clearly winning and there's no complications, its easy to bang out a move.
    If the position is complicated, then I'll log in several times and have a look, and think about it in the meantime.

    Maybe something like this is going on for your opponent.

    That said, if a posi ...[text shortened]... is lost-lost with no possibility of a swindle or counterplay, then I'll resign it.

    Phil.
    You identified a large part of my uncertainty, as he/she could well be taking the extra time to find a way out. It's way too easy to fall into the trap of assigning malice to behavior when complete information is lacking, and I am trying hard not to fall into that trap. I should give everyone the same benefit of the doubt that I would want for myself.

    Paul
  11. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    24 Sep '09 11:17
    Originally posted by Goshen
    Oh excuse me. I thought it was a rival chess site. Sorry.
    No problem! My site is just a geek site, and I put a link and image of RHP right on the front page because I love playing here.
  12. 24 Sep '09 11:25
    That's one of the reasons I play less than ever and slow movers are highly irritating. However, how can it be considered unsporting if done within the rules and time controls? Playing on is the prerogative of the losing side. I have been offered a draw by a clearly losing opponent and while I found it irksome I also got a good laugh. That's just chess. Concentrate on other games and be patient and don't let it get under your skin for this may be a tactic.
  13. Standard member wormwood
    If Theres Hell Below
    24 Sep '09 12:47
    I always take a lot of time when there's any uncertainty of what to do. even when I'm winning. sometimes it can also happen during a forced recapture because I'm researching something a couple of moves later, and I need more than the 7 days I have. opening research can also sometimes mean I work through a whole book before committing or other material, which takes loads of time as well.

    and sometimes I'm just not up to it. don't have the time, or energy, haven't slept, am sick or something like that.

    there are loads of reasons someone might play slowly. also, as a rule, ALL stronger CC players do move slowly. the fast movers are almost invariably low rated players, there's a huge correlation between strength and taking one's time.
  14. 24 Sep '09 13:46
    Ah wormwood you're right about that.

    @ Paul its actually a nice looking site. Did you design it yourself?
  15. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    24 Sep '09 14:23 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Goshen
    Ah wormwood you're right about that.

    @ Paul its actually a nice looking site. Did you design it yourself?
    Thanks! I have been playing around with it, and I am still adding stuff as people make recommendations. I got the idea because I am a chess bookaholic and chess set collector, and guys in my club developed a habit of asking me how I got something so cheap, or where they could get the best deal on a book, etc. Someone suggested I should set up a website. There's lots of cool chess stuff on the net, so I add as people point out things.

    My latest link is to chesspublishing.com, which is an awesome opening resource. It's is literally like having an IM or GM recommend lines to you, and having them update you on a regular basis. I can't recommend it highly enough. I built a good portion of my chess database with their annotated games.

    Paul