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  1. Standard member Wulebgr
    Angler
    22 Oct '06 16:57 / 1 edit
    Sergei Rublevsky was one of Kramnik's seconds in the World Championship reunification match, and he is a candidate in the current FIDE cycle. He won a beauty prize for the game that gave birth to this theoretical position.

    white to move:

  2. 22 Oct '06 18:09
    Most of the people on this site would not have difficulty with finding Bxf6+ The crunch would come when a few moves earlier, how many would spot this opportunity.
  3. Standard member Wulebgr
    Angler
    22 Oct '06 18:11
    Originally posted by z00t
    Most of the people on this site would not have difficulty with finding Bxf6+ The crunch would come when a few moves earlier, how many would spot this opportunity.
    and after Kf8?
  4. Standard member GalaxyShield
    Mr. Shield
    22 Oct '06 18:22
    Originally posted by Wulebgr
    and after Kf8?
    Kf8 Bxe8? Threatens Qg7 which would win a rook or mate as far as I can see.
  5. Standard member GalaxyShield
    Mr. Shield
    22 Oct '06 18:24
    Originally posted by Sicilian Smaug
    Bxe8? Doesn't looks so bad Shield
    Yea, I know. Just giving myself a way out if it happened to be wrong.
  6. 22 Oct '06 18:28


    Hehe Hehe what about a funky move like Bf7?
  7. Standard member Wulebgr
    Angler
    22 Oct '06 18:28
    So, we see that the second move is the harder one.
  8. 22 Oct '06 18:31 / 1 edit


    Nope the position "plays itself" as I read in some Russian book. The situation after Bxf6 is not so good for Black.
  9. Standard member Wulebgr
    Angler
    22 Oct '06 18:34
    Originally posted by z00t
    [fen]4rk1r/3b1B2/1pq1pB2/p1np3p/7P/6Q1/PP3PP1/4R1K1 b - - 0 1[/fen]

    Nope the position "plays itself" as I read in some Russian book. The situation after Bxf6 is not so good for Black.
    For you it plays itself, but look at all the wrong answers before you posted the correct solution.
  10. Standard member Wulebgr
    Angler
    22 Oct '06 18:42
    Same game.

    White to move.




    Lputian resigned after Rublevsky's move from this position. The move should be easy to find after the foregoing discussion.
  11. Standard member GalaxyShield
    Mr. Shield
    22 Oct '06 18:44
    Originally posted by Wulebgr
    For you it plays itself, but look at all the wrong answers before you posted the correct solution.
    You mean 1? Smaug and I had basically the same thought I believe.
  12. Standard member Amaurote
    No Name Maddox
    22 Oct '06 18:46
    Originally posted by z00t
    [fen]4rk1r/3b4/1pq1pBB1/p1np3p/7P/6Q1/PP3PP1/4R1K1 w - - 1 2 [/fen]

    Hehe Hehe what about a funky move like Bf7?
    Beautiful!
  13. Standard member GalaxyShield
    Mr. Shield
    22 Oct '06 18:48
    Originally posted by Sicilian Smaug
    Bxf6+
    Wouldn't it be Rxb6? Because it's the same game as the original position, and white still has his bishop. He needs it to take the pawn if he black takes the rook.
  14. Standard member Wulebgr
    Angler
    22 Oct '06 18:49
    Originally posted by Sicilian Smaug
    Oh well, my move still wins but in more moves.
    I'd say white should win from:



    (white to move)

    But, white still has some opportunity to go wrong, while the mate in three shown by z00t is clear. If black plays Kxf6 after the initial Bxf6, mate follows in four, but again not by grabbing the rooks.
  15. 22 Oct '06 19:00
    Perhaps the whole game should be viewed. Note how black gulped the pawns while his king was still in the centre

    [Event "4th Karpov It"]
    [Site "Poikovsky RUS"]
    [Date "2003.04.26"]
    [Round "6"]
    [White "Rublevsky"]
    [Black "S Lputian"]
    [Result "1-0"]
    [WhiteElo "2670"]
    [BlackElo "2638"]
    [EventDate "2003.04.20"]
    [ECO "C03"]
    [PlyCount "52"]

    1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nd2 Be7 4. Ngf3 Nf6 5. e5 Nfd7 6. Bd3 c5 7. c3 Nc6 8. O-O a5 9. Re1 cxd4 10. cxd4 Qb6 11. Nb1 Nxd4 12. Nxd4 Qxd4 13. Nc3 Qb6 14. Qg4 Kf8 15. Nb5 Nc5 16. Be3 Bd7 17. Nd6 Bxd6 18. exd6 Qxd6 19. Qg3 Qc6 20. Rac1 b6 21. Rc3 h5 22. h4 Rc8 23. Bd4 f6 24. Bg6 Re8 25. Rf3 Ke7 26. Rxf6
    1-0