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  1. 09 May '06 21:26
    Given the rarity of a worthwhile en passant move, what is its rationale? Does anyone know its origin and exactly why it exists?
  2. 09 May '06 21:51
    What I heard was this: a few hundred years ago most chess games you could only move the pawn one. Most games started 1.e3 e6 2.e4 e5. People decided to let the pawn move two squares on its first move to speed the game up (what a bigger change it is than that though...) but then to be 'fair' you were still allowed to capture the pawn 'in passing' on that move only as if it had just moved one. (Because in the old rules if white had a pawn e.g. on e5 black would have to play d6 before d5 and then it could be captured; but once you can play it straight to d5 you avoid the 'fair' capture the pawn should have been able to make.)
  3. Standard member Freddie2008
    9 Edits
    09 May '06 21:51
    Originally posted by geofftaliban
    Given the rarity of a worthwhile en passant move, what is its rationale? Does anyone know its origin and exactly why it exists?
    It exists because originally pawns were only allowed to move one square on their opening move. But when the new rule of moving 2 squares was introduced, it was realised that you could avoid opposition pawns on the 3/6 rank by just moving two squares. So en passent was introduced to make up for this.
  4. Standard member coentje
    Plop!
    09 May '06 22:05
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/En_passant

    Historically, en passant is one of the last series of major rule changes in European chess that occurred in the 14th to 15th century, together with the introduction of the two-square first move for pawns, castling, and the unlimited range for queens and bishops. Because of their separation from European chess prior to that period, the Asian chess variants do not feature any of these moves.

    The idea behind en passant was that when the two-square first move for pawns was introduced to speed up the opening phase, this should not allow pawns to sneak past opposing pawns. Although a novice introduced to en passant by an opponent in the course of a game will often react with incredulity at the apparent illogic of this rule, upon closer examination, it is quite logical. As its name implies, the conceit is that a pawn, which ordinarily moves only one square at a time, cannot move immediately to a square two rows ahead. It is thus vulnerable to being killed "in passing" through the first square to get to the second. The same principle can be seen in the rule that one cannot castle through 'check'. Since a King ordinarily moves only one square at a time, he cannot move two squares at once, and thus renders himself vulnerable to being killed in passing through the first square. Since by the conventions of chess, a King is not allowed to expose himself to death, castling through 'check' is not allowed.
  5. 10 May '06 00:01
    I invented the en passant rule back in 1969, it was an old indian trick I learned in Viet Nam.
  6. Standard member Wulebgr
    Angler
    10 May '06 02:40
    Originally posted by General Putzer
    I invented the en passant rule back in 1969, it was an old indian trick I learned in Viet Nam.
    move 10:

    Staunton,H - Popert,H [C44]
    London m1 London, 1842
    1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 exd4 4.Bc4 Bb4+ 5.c3 dxc3 6.bxc3 Ba5 7.e5 Nge7 8.Ba3 0–0 9.0–0 d5 10.exd6 cxd6 11.Bxd6 Bg4 12.Be2 Re8 13.h3 Bh5 14.g4 Bg6 15.Bb5 h5 16.Ne5 hxg4 17.hxg4 Be4 18.Re1 Bxb1 19.Rxb1 Bxc3 20.Nxf7 Kxf7 21.Qb3+ Kf8 22.Bxe7+ Rxe7 23.Qxc3 Qd7 24.Qh3 Qd5 25.Bxc6 Rxe1+ 26.Rxe1 bxc6 27.Qh8+ Qg8 28.Qxg8+ Kxg8 29.Re7 a5 30.Rc7 Ra6 ½–½
  7. Subscriber Marinkatomb
    wotagr8game
    10 May '06 03:42
    Originally posted by Sicilian Smaug
    I was once playing chess with a Polish friend that could barely speak a word of English. I let him get away with moving 2 pawns one square each in one go at the start in reply to my e4 (After much attempt of arguing with him that it wasnt allowed). Then came my en passant move which was met with a glare followed by protests of 'NO RUE!' and him grabbi ...[text shortened]... p my board and left.
    Why cant everyone learn the sodding rules? There are not that many.
    Every time i play it OTB in casual chess outside my chess club i end up in the same argument. I just let people get away with it now to save argument. Anyone who doesn't know the rule generally isn't that good anyway...
  8. 10 May '06 17:45
    Originally posted by geofftaliban
    Given the rarity of a worthwhile en passant move, what is its rationale? Does anyone know its origin and exactly why it exists?
    Don't forget, that even though the move occurs rarely, it comes into play much more than it is actually played.

    There are many times in thinking that I'll have to observe that "if I move my pawn there, my opponent will take me en passant." Thus I don't make my move and my opponent does not utilize en passant. It still has a big affect.
  9. 10 May '06 18:06
    It's kind of interesting that one must utilize the oppurtunity of EP immidiately.

    Sometimes you can set up so that your opponent will get an advantage from using EP against you, with the exception that he cannot do it immidiately or he will be at disadvantage. Which means there isn't enough time to utilize EP..

    I wonder what it would be like if one could choose to make EP in 2-3 moves (providing no piece is in the way)..
  10. 10 May '06 21:33
    Probably, yes.
  11. 10 May '06 21:39
    It exists because God wishes it to exist. We cannot know his design. Except to know that it is intelligent. If you question this, a terrible fate shall await you.
  12. 10 May '06 22:59
    Originally posted by Sicilian Smaug
    I killed God last year with my crossbow.
    Can you really kill what does not exist?
  13. Standard member Wulebgr
    Angler
    11 May '06 13:15
    Originally posted by gobacktotexas
    It exists because God wishes it to exist. We cannot know his design. Except to know that it is intelligent. If you question this, a terrible fate shall await you.
    The Caro-Kann exists, although God did not will that.
  14. 16 May '06 22:33
    Originally posted by gobacktotexas
    It exists because God wishes it to exist. We cannot know his design. Except to know that it is intelligent. If you question this, a terrible fate shall await you.
    Hey gobacktotexas:
    Your unwavering faith is admirable, but altogether unresponsive rearding en passant! On which day did God "wish it to exist," and why, my theocratic friend. Was it was the same day he created Eve from Adam's rib, for both women and en passant are susceptible to corruption by serpents?
  15. Standard member Red Night
    RHP Prophet
    17 May '06 03:27
    Originally posted by Sicilian Smaug
    I was once playing chess with a Polish friend that could barely speak a word of English. I let him get away with moving 2 pawns one square each in one go at the start in reply to my e4 (After much attempt of arguing with him that it wasnt allowed). Then came my en passant move which was met with a glare followed by protests of 'NO RUE!' and him grabbi ...[text shortened]... p my board and left.
    Why cant everyone learn the sodding rules? There are not that many.
    I remember having a similiar experience in Austria in the early 70's. I played two different opponents who both insisted they could simultaneously move both Rook pawns forward one square.

    I argued for awhile and then let them get away with it.