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  1. 27 Jan '06 23:15
    I'm relatively new to chess. I really enjoy the game. I'd like to learn more on opneings, but I'm discouraged by most books. I find them just to complex and not practicle when it comes to explaining the opening. What I mean is they'll start explaining the opening and then give you a few variations of the ideal reply and etc... Being a begginer and playing online very rarely do my opponents reply in the ideal manner like explained in the books. So most of the information is useless.

    Are their any web sites or books that'll help me with openings in the way I like to learn them? For example something that will explain how you should evolve that opening. For example the english often transposes into (only moves for white) 1. Pc4 2. Nc3 3. Nf3 4.Pg3 5. Bg2 6. Pb3 7. Bb2. The replys are all relative, are their any websites or books out their that explain openings in the simple way like I just described above???
  2. 27 Jan '06 23:24
    Originally posted by estonian3
    I'm relatively new to chess. I really enjoy the game. I'd like to learn more on opneings, but I'm discouraged by most books. I find them just to complex and not practicle when it comes to explaining the opening. What I mean is they'll start explaining the opening and then give you a few variations of the ideal reply and etc... Being a begginer and pl ...[text shortened]... s or books out their that explain openings in the simple way like I just described above???
    General books on openings are very rare and don't go in depth. Specific openings book are dull and hard to read. What I suggest is stop worrying about the openings that much.

    You seem to know the general opening scheme and just follow that. What I suggest is:

    1.Open with the e or d pawn
    2.Move you knight to c3 or f3 since it mostly attacks a pawn on d5 or e5
    3.Move you bishop
    4.Castle

    They just connect your rooks and you are out of the opening. Games at our level don't get won mostly out of the opening. We blunder or miss some tactic. Study your tactics. Have a look a my chess lessons on this forum. I try to give some general opening stuff there.
  3. Standard member Grandmouster
    ChessObsessed
    27 Jan '06 23:41
    Originally posted by estonian3
    I'm relatively new to chess. I really enjoy the game. I'd like to learn more on opneings, but I'm discouraged by most books. I find them just to complex and not practicle when it comes to explaining the opening. What I mean is they'll start explaining the opening and then give you a few variations of the ideal reply and etc... Being a begginer and pl ...[text shortened]... s or books out their that explain openings in the simple way like I just described above???
    In order to fully understand openings in general, you will need to understand middlegames. In order to fully understand middlegames, you will need to understand endgames.
    If you have a pitucular opening in mind, look up the games in a database.
    Follow ganes of 2400+ with wins for that opening.
    annotation is not neccesary until your 1600 or so. Then read some opening books.
    Dont waste your time with detailed opening books, with a million variations.
    Start with some of the early master games, and work up to modern times.
  4. 27 Jan '06 23:58
    Originally posted by Grandmouster
    In order to fully understand openings in general, you will need to understand middlegames.....to fully understand middlegames, you will need to understand endgames.

    Follow games of 2400+ with wins for that opening.
    ......Then read some opening books.
    Dont waste your time with detailed opening books, with a million variations.
    .
    Excellent advice!
  5. Standard member Grandmouster
    ChessObsessed
    28 Jan '06 00:02
    Originally posted by masscat
    Excellent advice!
    Thank you
  6. 28 Jan '06 00:07
    To learn the basic ideas behind some openings, try the Exeter Chess Club website.

    Google "Exeter Chess Club".
  7. 28 Jan '06 00:08 / 1 edit
    Not to re open an arguement of Tactics over Poitional chess.

    I have gone through a few teaching aides that used both tactics and positional thought.

    Three guidelines for beginners when opening in a game:

    1). Every move you make should give you more options to move.
    2). Make every move complete. Or don't remake moves.
    3). Always maintain threat over or control of the center of the board.

    The King or Queen pawn openings that were suggested. Are excellent ways to start because they provide a threat to the center while opening an avenue for the bishops. And it didn't take you two moves to get a pawn to the fourth rank!
  8. Standard member Grandmouster
    ChessObsessed
    28 Jan '06 00:51
    Originally posted by Bishopcrw
    Not to re open an arguement of Tactics over Poitional chess.

    I have gone through a few teaching aides that used both tactics and positional thought.

    Three guidelines for beginners when opening in a game:

    1). Every move you make should give you more options to move.
    2). Make every move complete. Or don't remake moves.
    3). Always maintain threat ...[text shortened]... an avenue for the bishops. And it didn't take you two moves to get a pawn to the fourth rank!
    a threat could be tactical or positional..
  9. Standard member buffalobill
    Major Bone
    28 Jan '06 12:11
    Originally posted by estonian3
    I'm relatively new to chess. I really enjoy the game. I'd like to learn more on opneings, but I'm discouraged by most books. I find them just to complex and not practicle when it comes to explaining the opening. What I mean is they'll start explaining the opening and then give you a few variations of the ideal reply and etc... Being a begginer and pl ...[text shortened]... s or books out their that explain openings in the simple way like I just described above???
    There's some good advice here, but a lot of games are lost in the opening from poor, basic positional play, so you need to get a basic grasp of openings and the ideas behind them. The Exeter Chess club is okay but messy. My favourite opening primer is: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Chess_openings
    It's about all you need now.

    Spend your time on studying tactics and recognising positional opportunities. http://www.chesstactics.org/ will keep you busy for a while. Once you've gone through it once, do it again. Your chess will definitely improve.

    Also, read this thread: http://www.redhotpawn.com/board/showthread.php?threadid=37140&page=1

    Then study endgames starting with the greatest endgame player of them all, Capablance. Chernev's book on Capa is excellent.
  10. 28 Jan '06 23:03
    Originally posted by buffalobill
    There's some good advice here, but a lot of games are lost in the opening from poor, basic positional play, so you need to get a basic grasp of openings and the ideas behind them. The Exeter Chess club is okay but messy. My favourite opening primer is: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Chess_openings
    It's about all you need now.

    Spend your time o ...[text shortened]... th the greatest endgame player of them all, Capablance. Chernev's book on Capa is excellent.
    I see a lot of people posting this site, the wikipedia one.

    I look through it and i'm not sure why people like it so much. You can't learn much from it can you if your not a beginner? For beginners and such its good but what would a class A or expert player use that site for?

    I'm just asking because one of the master at our club posted that site and i'm not sure what he got out of looking there?
  11. Standard member buffalobill
    Major Bone
    28 Jan '06 23:40
    Originally posted by RahimK
    I see a lot of people posting this site, the wikipedia one.

    I look through it and i'm not sure why people like it so much. You can't learn much from it can you if your not a beginner? For beginners and such its good but what would a class A or expert player use that site for?

    I'm just asking because one of the master at our club posted that site and i'm not sure what he got out of looking there?
    Because it's a good primer for beginners. My opening theory is weak, so I use it and it helps. And I don't own opening books.
  12. 28 Jan '06 23:46
    Originally posted by buffalobill
    Because it's a good primer for beginners. My opening theory is weak, so I use it and it helps. And I don't own opening books.
    Gotta ya.
  13. 28 Jan '06 23:57
    Originally posted by estonian3
    I'm relatively new to chess. I really enjoy the game. I'd like to learn more on opneings, but I'm discouraged by most books. I find them just to complex and not practicle when it comes to explaining the opening. What I mean is they'll start explaining the opening and then give you a few variations of the ideal reply and etc... Being a begginer and pl ...[text shortened]... s or books out their that explain openings in the simple way like I just described above???
    Try to get "The Ideas Behind The Chess Openings" by Reuben Fine.
    A must read. An enjoyable book which explain the conceptual background of all the classical openings.

    Cheers.
  14. 29 Jan '06 03:57
    Originally posted by LittleBear
    Try to get "The Ideas Behind The Chess Openings" by Reuben Fine.
    A must read. An enjoyable book which explain the conceptual background of all the classical openings.

    Cheers.
    Get the new version! The one with old notation is frustrating and the yellow pages don't help either.
  15. Standard member Grandmouster
    ChessObsessed
    29 Jan '06 04:13
    Originally posted by RahimK
    Get the new version! The one with old notation is frustrating and the yellow pages don't help either.
    there might be a software version. Or one for chessbase. You just need the notation, and Chessbase light