Please turn on javascript in your browser to play chess.
Only Chess Forum

Only Chess Forum

  1. 02 Jun '10 04:47
    Hello Everyone

    Do you use the "Analyze Board" feature on this site to explore what move to make during an ongoing (non blitz) game?

    Do you consider doing this to be unethical and a form of cheating?

    I quite often use the "Analyze Board" during my games on this site under the assumption (perhaps mistaken), that playing "Internet Chess" is essentially the modern version of "Correspondence Chess" where it is common place to analyze candidates moves by actually moving pieces over a chess board.

    I am posting this question in an attempt to understand how most people on this site feel about this issue.

    I did a search for "cheating" here on the forums but I was only able to find references to cheating by using computer programs to help you identify a move. I fully agree that doing so is clearly cheating.

    If most people on this site don't analyze their ongoing games over a board (either virtual or real), then those who do have an unfair advantage over the rest and their ratings are seriously inflated.

    I would love to post this as a poll, but I don't know if it is possible to do so. If anyone knows, please let me know how to do so and I will go ahead and do that as well.

    Perhaps you can reply with your thoughts on this matter.

    Best Regards

    Miguel Angel (alias Alemanma)
  2. 02 Jun '10 05:01
    The only difference between using 'Analyse Board' and 'Conditional Move Board' is that you kick yourself harder if you make a mistake on the Conditional Move Board.

    I am pretty sure greenpawn has mentioned that over-reliance on the Analyse Board function stunts your chess growth. However if you are just learning, like myself, the the Analyse Board function is a invaluable to avoid complete and absolute chess suckitude.


    Not that it doesnt hurt a persons pride when after a game a third party mentions that a move you pondered for a long period on the analyze board was actually terrible mistake.
  3. 02 Jun '10 07:03
    I asked this very question a year or two ago. Cheating is primarily to do with getting assistance from a human or a chess engine. Using the "Analyse Board" function is not cheating, and is perfectly acceptable for RHP games. Whether it is good for you is another question entirely, and opinion seems split. Some say that not using a board (real, or browser) to examine moves means you will be playing weaker moves than you could. Others feel that relying on the board too much limits development of the ability to visualise moves in your head, which may prevent growth as an OTB player.

    I think both positions contain some truth. If I played OTB then I would probably stop using the analyse board function.

    As for conditional moves, I don't trust myself enough to use them!
  4. Standard member randolph
    the walrus
    02 Jun '10 07:40
    I'd hazard a guess that most people don't use the analysis board- but that is their own choice. I occasionally use it for my more tactical games and there was a point in time where I was taking all of my games to a real board and analyzing there. Compare it to a test in school; some people might not study, and will probably get worse grades because of it, but should the teacher change their grades to reflect that? Absolutely not. This is in contrast to, say, engine use- bringing a cheat sheet written on your hand.
  5. 02 Jun '10 07:52
    This site is a correspondence chess site so using analyze board is perfectly ok, although if you also play OTB it might make you a bit lazier in calcualting, so I never use it.
  6. Standard member Mariska Angela
    Nyuszi, golyó!
    02 Jun '10 08:15
    If the "Analyze Board" was cheating, it wouldn't be there in the first place would it.😕
  7. 02 Jun '10 15:34 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Mariska Angela
    If the "Analyze Board" was cheating, it wouldn't be there in the first place would it.😕
    hear, hear !

    p.s.
    however, if you're an OTB player, this might have an (negative) effect on your OTB skills and analysis, I'm told
  8. Standard member SwissGambit
    Caninus Interruptus
    02 Jun '10 20:50
    Originally posted by Alemanma
    I quite often use the "Analyze Board" during my games on this site under the assumption (perhaps mistaken), that playing "Internet Chess" is essentially the modern version of "Correspondence Chess" where it is common place to analyze candidates moves by actually moving pieces over a chess board.
    "Internet Chess" with time controls measured in days or longer can be assumed to be correspondence chess, yes. Books and separate analysis boards are generally fair game.

    This differs from "Internet Chess" with time controls like game in 3 minutes, which are more like OTB time controls.
  9. Standard member finnegan
    GENS UNA SUMUS
    02 Jun '10 23:25
    I use it quite a lot, especially if my opponent is much stronger than me. I think this is correspondence chess and I assume my opponent uses the same facility.

    One reason is to check previous moves and recollect what has been going on because, unlike OTB, there is a long delay between moves. OTB I can get completely absorbed throughout and even if I walk away from the board I still typically have the position in my mind. Here, it is too easy to forget the whole line of reasoning that got me into the position. Taking each move as an isolated problem instead of part of a game is not at all like OTB. Playing over earlier moves brings me back into the game.

    Another reason is that it is fascinating sometimes. I play to enjoy it and I can try lines that would not seem safe enough OTB just to see where they lead.

    And when I already know I have a great winning line, I just indulge in the sheer delight of it over and over!
  10. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    02 Jun '10 23:28
    I like to use chessbase for this function, although any game reader will do. With chessbase, I can move the pieces and the line records automatically, so I can go back to the original position, start a new line, and compare it with the old line.

    Sometimes I do it alot, while other games are more straightforward and I don't bother.

    Paul
  11. 03 Jun '10 12:22
    Originally posted by finnegan
    One reason is to check previous moves and recollect what has been going on because, unlike OTB, there is a long delay between moves. OTB I can get completely absorbed throughout and even if I walk away from the board I still typically have the position in my mind. Here, it is too easy to forget the whole line of reasoning that got me into the position. Tak ...[text shortened]... part of a game is not at all like OTB. Playing over earlier moves brings me back into the game.
    This is one of the major reasons I use the analyse board. Combined with the notes feature, it is invaluable for remember what my (often incorrect) plan was.
  12. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    03 Jun '10 14:36
    Originally posted by finnegan
    I use it quite a lot, especially if my opponent is much stronger than me. I think this is correspondence chess and I assume my opponent uses the same facility.

    One reason is to check previous moves and recollect what has been going on because, unlike OTB, there is a long delay between moves. OTB I can get completely absorbed throughout and even if I wa ...[text shortened]... ready know I have a great winning line, I just indulge in the sheer delight of it over and over!
    It's really no different than using a real chessboard and pieces on a real mail corr. game, it serves the same function and nobody could claim that is cheating so it is beyond me why some people would even claim it's cheating. They would be confusing OTB play with corr. chess.
  13. Subscriber kNIGHTHEAD
    aka DEFIANT
    03 Jun '10 18:24
    This question beckons..... how many players us it vs how many don't?
  14. 04 Jun '10 17:02
    Originally posted by kNIGHTHEAD
    This question beckons..... how many players us it vs how many don't?
    It seems that the general concensus regarding the use of the "Analyze Board" feature to choose which move to make in internet chess games:

    - is not considered to be cheating

    - it hampers the development of "in your head" analysis

    - provides an "unfair" advantage to its users (versus non-users)

    - may lead to inflated ratings (compared to OTB ratings)

    Which brings us to the question posted by Knighthead:

    ==> "How many players use it vs how many don't? "

    It would be nice to be able to tell when your opponent is using it as a game marches on !!!
  15. 04 Jun '10 17:37 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by Alemanma


    - provides an "unfair" advantage to its users (versus non-users)

    I don't get the gist of it.. since it's there, it's legal and "fair"... that's like saying that Flip Board or Notebook features are also 'unfair' advantage (vs. non-users), it's not that subs would get it but non-subs not, *everyone* CAN use it..