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  1. 10 Oct '06 02:45
    sorry if this is common practice or already been discussed....I'm a beginner considering using an engine to analyze my position AFTER I move (the move I should have made), not before, or my opponent's possible moves. IMHO, if I try to understand the whys behind the computer moves, perhaps I can get a sense of what a strong player would do in my shoes- while still doing the heavy lifting myself.

    Do you think this would be instructive?
    and is it fair to my opponent?
  2. Donation !~TONY~!
    1...c5!
    10 Oct '06 02:53
    It would be instructive, it's also cheating and completely against the rules.
  3. 10 Oct '06 03:02
    yes cheating, and computer use during a game is not strictly not allowed.
  4. 10 Oct '06 03:38
    You can only use it after the whole game is over.

    Just because you didn't play that move right then doesn't mean that you can't play that move the next move.

    Pretend you don't see a tactic and make your move, your opponent also doesn't see it and the position basically remains the same. You use the chess program AFTER you made your move and it shows you the tactics and it's still possible so you play it. CHEATING.
  5. 10 Oct '06 03:57
    Originally posted by RahimK
    You can only use it after the whole game is over.

    Just because you didn't play that move right then doesn't mean that you can't play that move the next move.

    Pretend you don't see a tactic and make your move, your opponent also doesn't see it and the position basically remains the same. You use the chess program AFTER you made your move and it shows you the tactics and it's still possible so you play it. CHEATING.
    Yes, I think I agreed fully with Rahim's view. It's a good idea to analyse the game AFTER the whole game. If you have a stronger player friend who can actually spend the time to discuss the game, it's even better. Players can learn a lot from post mortems.

    I'd like to add that in my opinion, you can feel free to use the 'analyse' facility on here to try out various possible moves before actually making (submitting) a move. I don't consider that as cheating, as long as you figure out the moves on your own. In an OTB games, you still get to analyse possible variations before actually making a move, but the only difference is that you do in all in your mind, which is obviously more difficult and mentally exhausting.
  6. 10 Oct '06 04:12
    Originally posted by HeyDreza
    sorry if this is common practice or already been discussed....I'm a beginner considering using an engine to analyze my position AFTER I move (the move I should have made), not before, or my opponent's possible moves.
    Still cheating. You should do this after your game is complete.

    Even after the game it is still a very good idea for precisely the reasons you cite.
  7. 10 Oct '06 04:17
    Originally posted by ckoh1965
    Yes, I think I agreed fully with Rahim's view. It's a good idea to analyse the game AFTER the whole game. If you have a stronger player friend who can actually spend the time to discuss the game, it's even better. Players can learn a lot from post mortems.

    I'd like to add that in my opinion, you can feel free to use the 'analyse' facility on here to try ...[text shortened]... at you do in all in your mind, which is obviously more difficult and mentally exhausting.
    Analyse board is allowed and and hence it doesn't matter if you do not consider it cheating or consider it cheating.

    It isn't cheating period. However, analyse in your head first and then use the analyse feature. Otherwise you become lazy in OTB and play badly when you are forced to calculate several moves deep.
  8. 10 Oct '06 04:47
    thanks for not consigning me to h*** for inquiring. I see what you mean about a tactic that remains there after a move or two.
    So is selecting a few crucial positions to analyze (after the game ends) recommended for someone with limited time, or marching thru the entire game ?
  9. 10 Oct '06 04:51
    Originally posted by HeyDreza
    thanks for not consigning me to h*** for inquiring. I see what you mean about a tactic that remains there after a move or two.
    So is selecting a few crucial positions to analyze (after the game ends) recommended for someone with limited time, or marching thru the entire game ?
    If you are serious about the game, you must put time and effort into it. Otherwise, you play it for fun only. You still get to improve, but you probably won't go very far. That's why I gave up on this beautiful game years ago. To improve to competition level is not easy. Even Topalov and Kramnik still must put a lot of effort up to now.
  10. 10 Oct '06 04:58 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by HeyDreza
    thanks for not consigning me to h*** for inquiring. I see what you mean about a tactic that remains there after a move or two.
    So is selecting a few crucial positions to analyze (after the game ends) recommended for someone with limited time, or marching thru the entire game ?
    I use the "Notes" feature for precisely that. Although, you might be surprised what "obvious" good moves you missed when you weren't looking. (non-"crucial" positions).
  11. 10 Oct '06 05:05
    Originally posted by HeyDreza
    thanks for not consigning me to h*** for inquiring. I see what you mean about a tactic that remains there after a move or two.
    So is selecting a few crucial positions to analyze (after the game ends) recommended for someone with limited time, or marching thru the entire game ?
    i'll play an unrated game with you can you can do that, maybe talk a bit about it as well. who knows we might learn a few moves. if you're interested?
  12. 10 Oct '06 05:05
    Originally posted by HeyDreza
    thanks for not consigning me to h*** for inquiring. I see what you mean about a tactic that remains there after a move or two.
    So is selecting a few crucial positions to analyze (after the game ends) recommended for someone with limited time, or marching thru the entire game ?
    You should be able to cut and paste the game straight into your chess programme or get the pgn emailed to you and use this - so playing through the whole game can be as quick or slow as you like.
  13. 10 Oct '06 14:12
    Originally posted by HeyDreza
    thanks for not consigning me to h*** for inquiring. I see what you mean about a tactic that remains there after a move or two.
    So is selecting a few crucial positions to analyze (after the game ends) recommended for someone with limited time, or marching thru the entire game ?
    I have Fritz8 and have only just begun analyzing games with it. Just paste the PGN into whatever engine you have and set your parameters, then go do something else while it goes over your game. When you come back, you will have a great analysis of your tactical mistakes, and probably a number of suggested lines that you didn't make at various stages in the game. With limited time, do this only with your losses. You can include wins if you like, but try to make sure they were games that you realized at some point that you were being outplayed, and focus on what the computer suggests at those moments. Remember-do this only AFTER games have been finished, and good luck.
  14. Standard member Dragon Fire
    Lord of all beasts
    10 Oct '06 14:22
    If you have time ALWAYS analyse your wins as well. You will be surprised how many good moves you missed and how obvious some of them are. Analysing wins helps improve just as much if not more than losses. When you lose you almost always know where your mistake was but when you win it is often difficult to understand why you struggled when you thought it should be easy.