Please turn on javascript in your browser to play chess.
Only Chess Forum

Only Chess Forum

  1. 19 Apr '06 12:48 / 2 edits
    Have READ (in this order):
    Bobby Fischer Teaches Chess by Fischer
    Everyone’s 2nd Chess Book by Dan Heisman
    (I knew *NOTHING* about chess when I read the two above; I just grabbed 'em off a shelf at Barnes and Noble.)
    Play Winning Chess by Seirawan
    Winning Chess Tactics by Seirawan
    Winning Chess Strategies by Seirawan
    Winning Chess Endings by Seirawan
    The Amateur's Mind by Silman


    Have NOT READ:
    1 - Logical Chess: Move By Move: Every Move Explained by Chernev
    2 - Chess: The Art of Logical Thinking : From the 1st Move to the Last by McDonald
    3 - Art of Attack in Chess by Vokovic
    4 - How to Reassess Your Chess by Silman
    5 - Pawn Power in Chess by Hans Kmoch
    6 - Pawn Structure Chess by Soltis
    7 - Winning Pawn Structures by Baburin
    8 - My System: 21st Century Edition by Aron Nimzowitsch
    9 - Secrets of Modern Chess Strategy by John Watson
    10 - 1,001 Winning Chess Sacrifices and Combinations by Fred Reinfeld
    11 - Basic Chess Endings by Ruben Fine
    12 - Winning Chess Brilliancies by Seirawan



    Reading HERE & THERE:
    13 - Ultimate Chess Puzzle Book by John Emms
    14 - CHESS: 5,334 Problems, Combinations, and Games by Polgar
    15 - My 60 Memorable Games by Bobby Fischer
    16 - Zurich International Chess Tournament, 1953 by Bronstein
    17 - Ideas Behind the Chess Openings : Algebraic Edition by Ruben Fine
    18 - Winning Chess Openings by Seirawan
    19 – 33 - Miscellaneous Opening and Defense books

    Do any of you have advice for which book I should read next? What about the rest of them? Any advice for which order I should read the rest? I know this is a lot to ask for, but I figured this may help others, too. /shrug

    Any help is appreciated. Thanks.
  2. 19 Apr '06 13:13
    You seem to enjoy Seirawan, and I found his openings book instructional and elatively interesting compared with a lot of denser chess books. I imagine his Winning chess brilliancies would be an enjoyable read. I sometimes find chess masters games a little intimidating and frustrating when I can't see the genius of a supposedly brilliant move. But I guees Seirawan would elucidate.

    I read bits of Chernev's move by move a long tiome a go and have picked it up a few times since then, and tend to feel its a little out of date, and goes into comments onthe first moves which are almost always e4 or d4. He's entertaining but youi find no modern openings there and even some kings gambit etc. It makes you feel a little out of touch with moden currents in chess.

    I have How to reassess your chess by Silman and I think it is a good book, but I haven't read all of it. As you've already read him I'd go with him too. ANd he is offering a system to improve your understanding rather than just annotated games which is great.

    So The Silman and Seirawan are my reccomendations. Vukovic is probably pretty good too. One of my all tyime favotrite chess books is called Samurai chess which i borrowed from a library a few years back. By Michael Gelb who is also into juggling. Has a fair few martioal arts analogies and is really interesting reading due to anecdotes etc. I find this is rare in chess literature.

    Than again,you, unlike I, may have the patience and mindset to read very densely annotated books on pawn structure etc, and follow through computer analysis on every few moves of masters games. I myself really need to be entertained to keep reading.

    Good luck, and let me know of any books you find that are worth a look - im always keen to feed my obsession.
  3. 19 Apr '06 13:22 / 1 edit
    I guess I should make it clear that I have bought each of those and *fully intend on reading each one*. Advice on which order I should read them in would be helpful as so would comments on books you've read from my list.
  4. Standard member Ragnorak
    For RHP addons...
    19 Apr '06 14:39
    Originally posted by pinkthunder
    Have READ (in this order):
    Bobby Fischer Teaches Chess by Fischer
    Everyone’s 2nd Chess Book by Dan Heisman
    (I knew *NOTHING* about chess when I read the two above; I just grabbed 'em off a shelf at Barnes and Noble.)
    Play Winning Chess by Seirawan
    Winning Chess Tactics by Seirawan
    Winning Chess Strategies by Seirawan
    Winning Chess Endings by Se ...[text shortened]... o ask for, but I figured this may help others, too. /shrug

    Any help is appreciated. Thanks.
    Art of Attack in Chess is great.

    Don't know anything about the others.

    D
  5. 19 Apr '06 15:13
    Originally posted by pinkthunder
    I think you need to go through some considerations...

    If you're currently finding chess a bit tedious, then it may be important to pick up any book that stimulates your interest. Alternatively, if you're ready for some serious study then I think you should be directed by your recent games and the weaknesses they reveal.

    For example, the Baburin book focuses a lot on isolated queen pawns. Have you had any games recently that have shown this to be a weakness? Or how's your attacking play been doing? How many endgames have you botched up? etc.

    Of course, we can all improve in all areas and every one of your books is worth a read. But as your post highlights, we need to prioritise the order. My analysis of my recent OTB games has shown a common weakness in my calculation ability. So, I'm focusing my reading on the topic of calculation.
  6. 19 Apr '06 15:44
    First off, Here are the ones I can comment on
    2 - Chess: The Art of Logical Thinking : From the 1st Move to the Last by McDonald
    3 - Art of Attack in Chess by Vokovic
    4 - How to Reassess Your Chess by Silman
    10 - 1,001 Winning Chess Sacrifices and Combinations by Fred Reinfeld
    16 - Zurich International Chess Tournament, 1953 by Bronstein

    #2 I just picked this up but the first 2 games were good and it literally has explanations for every move. This may not be necessary, but I like it.

    #3 is a very dense book that I started and it did not keep my interest. Many people swear by it though

    #4 is the greatest chess book I have ever read. I look at things totally differently after reading that. The ideas are similar to those in the amatures mind, but better organized and presented.

    #10 - this is a great here & there puzzle book (#13 does this too, so put this aside)

    #16 - I love this collection of games, though I rarely play those. openings. Bronstein is sparse in his commentary, but always seems to pick the point when I most need it (I overlook what he points out). I think there are 210 games here, so it could take a long time.

    Personally, I would (and do) about 5 tactic puzzles a day then spend the rest of your time on #4 or #2.
  7. 19 Apr '06 16:22
    Originally posted by zebano
    #16 - I love this collection of games, though I rarely play those. openings. Bronstein is sparse in his commentary, but always seems to pick the point when I most need it (I overlook what he points out).
    As a minor aside, Dvoretsky claims that 'Zurich 1953' wasn't actually written by Bronstein. Instead, it was written by Bronstein's second (sorry, I'm not sure of his name... maybe Veinstein?!). Although Bronstein was the better player, his second was a more able and willing writer. In the context of other books written by Bronstein, I can believe this.
  8. 19 Apr '06 17:26
    The order in which you read a chess book is arbitrary. Sometimes I start with the last chapter and move forward, so that the preface is the last thing i read. Sometimes, especially in bed, I just look at the diagrams until i fall asleep. If it isn't fun and they don't have lots of pictures, I usually get bored fast and put it under the bed where it gathers dustbunnies. I have reread Nimzovitch's Praxis seventeen times, underlining key parts as i go, until the whole book is practically underlined and my rating declined two hundred points. I have discovered that if you eliminate words iand letters in a certain order in the Nimzovich book, it actually reads, "I am Shakespeare." I like the Silman books because they have lots of black and white pictures of people playing chess. Also, it is fun counting how many times he writes "imbalance." For my money the most instructive book is Giochinno Greco's The Royall Game of Chesse Playe, which contains many chess traps and over a hundred gambits--perfect for the club player. Remember, there are more books written about chess than any other game, and without these books most professional chess players would actually have to find employment.
  9. 20 Apr '06 19:38
    Originally posted by pinkthunder
    Have READ (in this order):
    Bobby Fischer Teaches Chess by Fischer
    Everyone’s 2nd Chess Book by Dan Heisman
    (I knew *NOTHING* about chess when I read the two above; I just grabbed 'em off a shelf at Barnes and Noble.)
    Play Winning Chess by Seirawan
    Winning Chess Tactics by Seirawan
    Winning Chess Strategies by Seirawan
    Winning Chess Endings by Se ...[text shortened]... o ask for, but I figured this may help others, too. /shrug

    Any help is appreciated. Thanks.
    I see you added some new book to your list. I read half of those and have heard about the other ones so here goes.

    18, 1,2,15, 12, 11, 17(I didn't like this book much but it was the old edition),8, 3, 4.

    5,6,7,9 I heard of them but they sound pretty advanced.

    10,13,14 Pick one and do 5-10 puzzles each day.

    16 no Idea.

    19-33 skip till later.
  10. 20 Apr '06 20:31 / 1 edit
    Do any of you have advice for which book I should read next? What about the rest of them? Any advice for which order I should read the rest? I know this is a lot to ask for, but I figured this may help others, too. /shrug

    Any help is appreciated. Thanks.[/b]
    3 - Art of Attack in Chess by Vokovic
    6 - Pawn Structure Chess by Soltis
    7 - Winning Pawn Structures by Baburin
    9 - Secrets of Modern Chess Strategy by John Watson

    A great list of books ! These four from your list are recommended. I read #6 and though highly of it because it explained how to to play the openings. #3 would be my second choice as it is a classic "must-read." #7 and #9 are excellent for the advanced players.
  11. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    20 Apr '06 21:07 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by tonytiger41
    3 - Art of Attack in Chess by Vokovic
    6 - Pawn Structure Chess by Soltis
    7 - Winning Pawn Structures by Baburin
    9 - Secrets of Modern Chess Strategy by John Watson

    A great list of books ! These four from your list are recommended. I read #6 and though highly of it because it explained how to to play the openings. #3 would be my second choice as it is a classic "must-read." #7 and #9 are excellent for the advanced players.
    Don't forget the GM game books. One I am reading right now is
    Mikhail Tal, the life and games of Tal, its a great book, very detailed analysis of almost every game and it shows some of the greatest games ever played, from the time he was like 8 or 10 yo to past his world champion days. BTW, he became 5 minute world champ before he died so he was a double world champion. Here is a link to a game he played in 1953, very early, lots of sacs:
    http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1139189
  12. 22 Apr '06 13:35
    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    Chessbook reviews by IM John Watson (highly recommended):



    http://www.chesscenter.com/twic/jwatson12.html

    http://www.chesscenter.com/bookreview.html

    http://chess.about.com/gi/dynamic/offsite.htm?zi=1/XJ&sdn=chess&zu=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.chess.co.uk%2Fbookreviewindex.html


    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    Other sites where you can find chess reviews:



    http://www.chesscafe.com/archives/reviews.htm

    http://www.jeremysilman.com/book_reviews/index_universal.html

    http://chess.about.com/gi/dynamic/offsite.htm?zi=1/XJ&sdn=chess&zu=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.bcmchess.co.uk%2Freviews%2Fbcmrev.html

    http://seagaard.dk/review/eng/content/index.asp

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    Good luck !
  13. 22 Apr '06 14:18 / 7 edits
    My suggestions (merely suggestions, it is more important to read the book which you are interested in) for reading your "HAVE NOT READ" books list.

    [One "must" though. You should read Nimzowitsch's My System, Vukovic's "The Art of Attack" and "Pawn Power in Chess" by Hans Kmoch first, before reading John Watson's "Secrets of Modern Chess Strategy".]

    Here goes:

    1 - Logical Chess: Move By Move: Every Move Explained by Chernev (!) *)
    2 - Chess: The Art of Logical Thinking : From the 1st Move to the Last by McDonald ( http://www.chesscafe.com/text/review465.pdf )
    3 - Basic Chess Endings by Ruben Fine
    4 - My System: 21st Century Edition by Aron Nimzowitsch (!) *) http://www.amazon.com/gp/cdp/member-reviews/A1EHZOOET26KRW/104-1374124-0636736?_encoding=UTF8
    5 - 1,001 Winning Chess Sacrifices and Combinations by Fred Reinfeld
    6 - Art of Attack in Chess by Vukovic (!) *)
    7 - Pawn Power in Chess by Hans Kmoch (!) *)
    8 - How to Reassess Your Chess by Silman
    9 - Pawn Structure Chess by Soltis
    10 - Winning Pawn Structures by Baburin
    11 - Winning Chess Brilliancies by Seirawan
    12 - Secrets of Modern Chess Strategy by John Watson (!) *)


    *) highly recommended