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Posers and Puzzles

Posers and Puzzles

  1. 20 Feb '07 19:34
    Tell me somewhere on this earth where the Fahrenheit and Celcius temperatures are equal.

    Show your work.
  2. 20 Feb '07 20:54
    Originally posted by GinoJ
    Tell me somewhere on this earth where the Fahrenheit and Celcius temperatures are equal.

    Show your work.
    I'm guessing you'd have to visit somewhere like Siberia or even Antarctica, as the Fahrenheit & Celcius scales intersect at -40 degrees.

    Taking Fahrenheit as (Celcius*1.8)+32

    -40*1.8 = -72

    -72+32 = -40
  3. 20 Feb '07 20:57
    Originally posted by martin williams
    I'm guessing you'd have to visit somewhere like Siberia or even Antarctica, as the Fahrenheit & Celcius scales intersect at -40 degrees.

    Taking Fahrenheit as (Celcius*1.8)+32

    -40*1.8 = -72

    -72+32 = -40
    F = 1.8C + 32
    x = 1.8x + 32
    x - 1.8x = 1.8x + 32 - 1.8x
    -0.8x = 32
    -8x = 320
    -x = 40
    x = -40


    So Anartica is a good answer.

    I'm soooo cold now.
  4. 20 Feb '07 21:00
    Please make sure to honour that vacation sign.
  5. 20 Feb '07 21:02
    Originally posted by Mephisto2
    Please make sure to honour that vacation sign.
    Sure, if makes you happy.







    p.s. I just did.
  6. 20 Feb '07 21:28
    There is no one and one only answer to this question.
    I would say that in every place using liquid nitrogen have temperature now and then a temperature of -40 degrees Celcius.
    Around the world at a certain elevation in atmosphere there is a temp of -40.
    So the answer is not well defined.

    Tell me, Gino, where is the coldest known place in entire Universe?
  7. 21 Feb '07 05:09
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    There is no one and one only answer to this question.
    I would say that in every place using liquid nitrogen have temperature now and then a temperature of -40 degrees Celcius.
    Around the world at a certain elevation in atmosphere there is a temp of -40.
    So the answer is not well defined.

    Tell me, Gino, where is the coldest known place in entire Universe?
    You tell me.
  8. 21 Feb '07 06:31
    Rumor is that location is within one of the research labs, where they've managed to reach signifcantly less than 1 Kelvin.

    (Kelvin uses the Celsius scale, but sets the zero point to Absolute Zero (-273.15 degrees Celsius), which is theoretically the lowest possible temperature possible, as determined by extrapolation of certain chemical properties.)
  9. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    21 Feb '07 19:04
    Originally posted by geepamoogle
    Rumor is that location is within one of the research labs, where they've managed to reach signifcantly less than 1 Kelvin.

    (Kelvin uses the Celsius scale, but sets the zero point to Absolute Zero (-273.15 degrees Celsius), which is theoretically the lowest possible temperature possible, as determined by extrapolation of certain chemical properties.)
    Yeah, more like 1/1,000,000 th of a kelvin. As you get closer to absolute zero, it gets very tricky indeed to cool things down further, and now they are playing with things like Bose-Einstein condensates which were first predicted by those two 80 years ago, whereby if you get stuff cold enough, if they are like atoms to begin with, they merge to become as if they were all one big atom of the same stuff, that is to say they all assume the same quantum state and become one big happy, if cold, family. They were able to get that state of matter only a few years ago to prove the theory. Now everyone and their brother is doing it.
  10. 21 Feb '07 19:40
    So I expect the answer of my question is: In earthly laboratories? And I would say: Yes, correct answer.

    But can I be sure? Is there any known natural processes that can come to this low a temperature? Is Einstein Bose condensate a natural phase of materia anywhere in the Universe? Where is the coldest place in Universe, between the most distant galaxies there is? Is there a millionth of a Kelvin there?

    One other answer would be, yes in non-earthly laboratories operated by intelligent creatures. But this woud not be a correct answer in my well and distinct formulated question of the reason that this extra-terrestriel creatures are not known.
  11. Standard member PBE6
    Bananarama
    21 Feb '07 19:46
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    So I expect the answer of my question is: In earthly laboratories? And I would say: Yes, correct answer.

    But can I be sure? Is there any known natural processes that can come to this low a temperature? Is Einstein Bose condensate a natural phase of materia anywhere in the Universe? Where is the coldest place in Universe, between the most distant galaxi ...[text shortened]... distinct formulated question of the reason that this extra-terrestriel creatures are not known.
    Another answer would be in an unearthly crapper, put there by a species that extracts all the energy possible from their food and rejects the waste into a flush toilet at 1/1,000,000 K.
  12. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    21 Feb '07 19:50
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    So I expect the answer of my question is: In earthly laboratories? And I would say: Yes, correct answer.

    But can I be sure? Is there any known natural processes that can come to this low a temperature? Is Einstein Bose condensate a natural phase of materia anywhere in the Universe? Where is the coldest place in Universe, between the most distant galaxi ...[text shortened]... distinct formulated question of the reason that this extra-terrestriel creatures are not known.
    Don't forget there may be other scientifically advanced lifeforms out in that noticably large universe we find ourselves in. So 'earthly labs' may not be the only place, eh. But I don't think any natural process can produce temperatures anywhere close to that, especially considering the temperature of space is 2.73 degrees Kelvin (Cosmic Background Radiation) which was first quantified by the COBE probe and now even more accurately. So if you had, for instance, a rock in inter-galactic space, millions of light years from any other source of heat, it cannot get colder than the CBR, no matter how hot it was to start. Say it got flung out of a solar system and was at 400 degrees Kelvin to start with, it will radiate out its inner heat and keep radiating untill it reaches equilibrium with the CBR. At that point the outgoing heat and the incoming heat is the same so it would eventually end up at 2.73 Degrees Kelvin. Even if you put that rock into an insulated box, the insulation only retards the heat transfer, it doesn't stop it. It would be a 2.7 degree heat source and in time frames of millions of years that heat would penetrate the insulation eventually and the rock would go up to 2.7 degrees even if it started out at absolute zero.
    And to have started out at absolute zero would have meant the intervention of intelligence so it kind of self defeats the purpose.
  13. 21 Feb '07 20:04
    In a lecture I held once, I was talking about sub Kelvin temperatures and said "And this (the laboratory) is the coldest place in the entire Universe!" and got immediate the question "And how would you know? Perhaps there is space people who do the same experiment?" And I had to admit, "Yes, good point, I wouldn't know."

    Now I have rephreased my statement to "And this is the coldest known place in the entire Universe!" because other intelligent beings with laboratories than the earthly ones are not known.
  14. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    21 Feb '07 20:19
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    In a lecture I held once, I was talking about sub Kelvin temperatures and said "And this (the laboratory) is the coldest place in the entire Universe!" and got immediate the question "And how would you know? Perhaps there is space people who do the same experiment?" And I had to admit, "Yes, good point, I wouldn't know."

    Now I have rephreased my statem ...[text shortened]... because other intelligent beings with laboratories than the earthly ones are not known.
    And here I thought I was being original....So much for that! So do you think the Drake equation could help us figure out how many other labs have such cold places?
  15. 21 Feb '07 21:25
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    And here I thought I was being original....So much for that! So do you think the Drake equation could help us figure out how many other labs have such cold places?
    Drake states the probablility and hence how many scientific well developed civilisations there is in the Universe. Another factor and we get the number of intelligent technological civilisations *with* a laboratory producing Einstein Bose condensate. (What will they call the matter?)

    Nature itself can't produce EB condencsate, right? Not even God himself? So this is a invention of man, and man alone, isn't it? As far we know it, of course...