Please turn on javascript in your browser to play chess.
Posers and Puzzles

Posers and Puzzles

  1. Standard member wolfgang59
    Infidel
    10 Nov '12 04:57
    Scottish bank notes are not legal tender in England.
    Are the English being unfair?
  2. 10 Nov '12 17:03
    Originally posted by wolfgang59
    Scottish bank notes are not legal tender in England.
    Are the English being unfair?
    English banknotes are not legal tender in Scotland either, so... no.
  3. Subscriber venda
    Dave
    10 Nov '12 17:33
    Originally posted by wolfgang59
    Scottish bank notes are not legal tender in England.
    Are the English being unfair?
    They will accept them at banks
    Similarly Northern Irish notes.
    I deposited mine when I came back from Belfast in my current account.
  4. 10 Nov '12 19:07 / 1 edit
    Yep, you can use Scottish banknotes in a lot of English shops too. The thing is, an English shop can refuse to sell something advertised for sale if offered Scottish banknotes, but cannot refuse to sell if given English banknotes.
  5. 10 Nov '12 19:28 / 3 edits
    Originally posted by iamatiger
    Yep, you can use Scottish banknotes in a lot of English shops too. The thing is, an English shop can refuse to sell something advertised for sale if offered Scottish banknotes, but cannot refuse to sell if given English banknotes.
  6. Standard member wolfgang59
    Infidel
    11 Nov '12 05:09
    Originally posted by iamatiger
    English banknotes are not legal tender in Scotland either, so... no.
    The interesting thing is that Scottish bank
    notes are not legal tender in Scotland!
  7. Subscriber venda
    Dave
    11 Nov '12 21:35
    Originally posted by wolfgang59
    The interesting thing is that Scottish bank
    notes are not legal tender in Scotland!
    I see now
    I wondered why this post was in the "posers and puzzles" forum.
    The answer is in the term "legal tender"
    Substitute the word "currency" for "tender" and the problem is solved.
    The term legal tender actually means the exact amount must be "tendered" so no "change" can be given!!
  8. Standard member wolfgang59
    Infidel
    11 Nov '12 21:42
    Originally posted by venda
    I see now
    I wondered why this post was in the "posers and puzzles" forum.
    The answer is in the term "legal tender"
    Substitute the word "currency" for "tender" and the problem is solved.
    The term legal tender actually means the exact amount must be "tendered" so no "change" can be given!!
    Most countries have limits on coinage so that large bills cannot be paid in coin.
    Scotland is unique (I think) in that the onlylegal tender is coin.

    In other words anyone in Scotland can refuse payment in notes!
  9. Subscriber deriver69
    Keeps
    21 Nov '12 08:08 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by wolfgang59
    Most countries have limits on coinage so that large bills cannot be paid in coin.
    Scotland is unique (I think) in that the [b]only
    legal tender is coin.

    In other words anyone in Scotland can refuse payment in notes![/b]
    Northern Ireland too I would think, explained as well as possible I think here

    http://www.royalmint.com/aboutus/policies-and-guidelines/legal-tender-guidelines

    Maybe best to start saving £1 and £2 coins to settle UK debts in court just to be on the safe side.

    I think shops are not obliged to sell you things in any currency. It is just considered to be rather a bad business model outside of Royston Vasey.