Posers and Puzzles

Posers and Puzzles

  1. Standard memberuzless
    The So Fist
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    20 Jan '10 08:382 edits
    in a triangle, if a2 + b2=c2, then find c if

    a=1
    b=1
  2. Joined
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    20 Jan '10 11:54
    Originally posted by uzless
    in a triangle, if a2 + b2=c2, then find c if

    a=1
    b=1
    Don't be irrational
  3. SubscriberAThousandYoung
    iViva la Hispanidad!
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    20 Jan '10 12:12
    Originally posted by uzless
    in a triangle, if a2 + b2=c2, then find c if

    a=1
    b=1
    c = 2

    Reveal Hidden Content
    1x2 + 1x2 = 2c
  4. Standard memberwolfgang59
    Mr. Wolf
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    20 Jan '10 16:10
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    c = 2

    [hidden]1x2 + 1x2 = 2c[/hidden]
    Thats a funny triangle with lengths 1,1,2 !!!
  5. Standard memberTheMaster37
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    20 Jan '10 16:26
    Originally posted by wolfgang59
    Thats a funny triangle with lengths 1,1,2 !!!
    Technically a line, but it IS the correct solution to the posed problem 🙂
  6. Standard memberforkedknight
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    20 Jan '10 16:311 edit
    Originally posted by TheMaster37
    Technically a line, but it IS the correct solution to the posed problem 🙂
    meh, nvm
  7. Joined
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    23 Jan '10 22:28
    I don't understand this entire thread. 😕
    By a2 do you mean a^2?
    If so, why isn't c = sqrt(2) ?
  8. Standard memberrandolph
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    24 Jan '10 03:48
    Originally posted by crazyblue
    I don't understand this entire thread. 😕
    By a2 do you mean a^2?
    If so, why isn't c = sqrt(2) ?
    that's what aty is making fun of
  9. Standard memberuzless
    The So Fist
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    24 Jan '10 22:40
    Originally posted by crazyblue
    I don't understand this entire thread. 😕
    By a2 do you mean a^2?
    If so, why isn't c = sqrt(2) ?
    poor crazyblue
  10. Account suspended
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    25 Jan '10 01:051 edit
    Actually, I think the theorem goes....." in any right-angled triangle, the square of the hypotenuse equals the sum of the squares of the other two sides"
  11. Standard memberuzless
    The So Fist
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    25 Jan '10 19:58
    Originally posted by missal
    Actually, I think the theorem goes....." in any [b]right-angled triangle, the square of the hypotenuse equals the sum of the squares of the other two sides"[/b]
    I was giving you guys credit to know that already. I'll remember not to do that next time.
  12. Standard memberuzless
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    25 Jan '10 20:00
    Originally posted by David113
    Don't be irrational
    no moves , yet you've figured out the forums already?


    what does 3a + 3a =?
  13. Joined
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    02 Feb '10 01:03
    The full formula from which the Pythagorus Theorem is based is as follows (as I recall)

    C^2 = A^2 + B^2 - 2*A*B*cos(o) (where o = the angle between sides A and B)

    At 90 degrees, cos(o) = 0, thus eliminating the third term.

    At 180 degrees, cos(o) = -1, making the formula C^2 = A^2 + B^2 + 2*A*B, which simplifies into C^2 = (A+B)^2. Given lengths are generally considered positive, C is thus A+B.
  14. Standard memberTheMaster37
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    03 Feb '10 11:42
    Originally posted by geepamoogle
    The full formula from which the Pythagorus Theorem is based is as follows (as I recall)

    C^2 = A^2 + B^2 - 2*A*B*cos(o) (where o = the angle between sides A and B)

    At 90 degrees, cos(o) = 0, thus eliminating the third term.

    At 180 degrees, cos(o) = -1, making the formula C^2 = A^2 + B^2 + 2*A*B, which simplifies into C^2 = (A+B)^2. Given lengths are generally considered positive, C is thus A+B.
    Pythagoras pretty much predates cos.
  15. Joined
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    03 Feb '10 11:55
    Originally posted by TheMaster37
    Pythagoras pretty much predates cos.
    This is the Pythagorean Theorem:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pythagorean_theorem

    Some resemblance to the Fermat's Last Theorem...
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