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Posers and Puzzles

Posers and Puzzles

  1. 24 Jan '07 03:41
    what weighs heavier?a pound of feathers or a pound of gold?

    notice: this is NOT a trick question.
  2. Subscriber BigDoggProblem
    The Advanced Mind
    24 Jan '07 04:15
    Originally posted by Ason Pigg2
    what weighs heavier?a pound of feathers or a pound of gold?

    notice: this is NOT a trick question.
    If it's not a trick question, they'd better weigh the same.
  3. Standard member HandyAndy
    Non sum qualis eram
    24 Jan '07 04:44
    Good problem. A pound of feathers is actually heavier than a pound of gold. Gold uses troy weight, feathers are avoirdupois. The opposite is true when you consider ounces. There are 12 troy ounces to a troy pound as opposed to 16 avoirdupois ounces to an avoirdupois pound.. so an ounce of gold is heavier than an ounce of feathers.
  4. 24 Jan '07 04:47
    Originally posted by HandyAndy
    Good problem. A pound of feathers is actually heavier than a pound of gold. Gold uses troy weight, feathers are avoirdupois. The opposite is true when you consider ounces. There are 12 troy ounces to a troy pound as opposed to 16 avoirdupois ounces to an avoirdupois pound.. so an ounce of gold is heavier than an ounce of feathers.
    this answer is correct...i'm surpriced with only 2 posts somebody got it.
  5. Standard member HandyAndy
    Non sum qualis eram
    24 Jan '07 04:50
    Originally posted by Ason Pigg2
    this answer is correct...i'm surpriced with only 2 posts somebody got it.
    Somebody fast.
  6. 24 Jan '07 04:52
    are you like a scientist o rsomething
  7. Standard member HandyAndy
    Non sum qualis eram
    24 Jan '07 05:10
    Originally posted by Ason Pigg2
    are you like a scientist o rsomething
    No. We learned about weights and measures in grammar school.
  8. 24 Jan '07 08:09
    Originally posted by HandyAndy
    Good problem. A pound of feathers is actually heavier than a pound of gold. Gold uses troy weight, feathers are avoirdupois. The opposite is true when you consider ounces. There are 12 troy ounces to a troy pound as opposed to 16 avoirdupois ounces to an avoirdupois pound.. so an ounce of gold is heavier than an ounce of feathers.
    Gould and feathers with the same mass weigh of course the same.

    One unit of water is of course not heavier in US than in Sweden, even if US uses gallons and Sweden uses litres. Saying otherwise is trying to redefine mass.

    But...

    If you want to know which is heavier, same mass of gould and feathers - try to drop it on you feet and you'll see.
  9. Standard member HandyAndy
    Non sum qualis eram
    24 Jan '07 12:00
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    Gould and feathers with the same mass weigh of course the same.

    One unit of water is of course not heavier in US than in Sweden, even if US uses gallons and Sweden uses litres. Saying otherwise is trying to redefine mass.

    But...

    If you want to know which is heavier, same mass of gould and feathers - try to drop it on you feet and you'll see.
    True, but a "pound" of feathers contains more mass than a "pound" of gold. I'd like to try your foot experiment -- do you have a pound of gold I could borrow until payday?
  10. 24 Jan '07 12:09
    Originally posted by HandyAndy
    True, but a "pound" of feathers contains more mass than a "pound" of gold. I'd like to try your foot experiment -- do you have a pound of gold I could borrow until payday?
    This must be a joke only appealed by americans. Their unit system seems to be very chaotic.
    For me a kilogram is always a kilogram always a kilogram, in fethers or in gold.

    About the foot experimen: Try a pound of led. Doesn't heurt as much but give a clue about the gould.

    When I ask a pupil how hot there is in the interiour of our sun I get the answer 14 million degrees. My counter question is allways - "Celcius or Kelvin?"

    When i tell peole how old the universe is, I usually says "It is 14 billion of years. It read that in a book. It is a bit older today."
  11. Standard member HandyAndy
    Non sum qualis eram
    24 Jan '07 14:13
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    This must be a joke only appealed by americans. Their unit system seems to be very chaotic.
    For me a kilogram is always a kilogram always a kilogram, in fethers or in gold.

    About the foot experimen: Try a pound of led. Doesn't heurt as much but give a clue about the gould.

    When I ask a pupil how hot there is in the interiour of our sun I get the an ...[text shortened]... usually says "It is 14 billion of years. It read that in a book. It is a bit older today."
    The troy and avoirdupois weight systems were developed in Europe long before America was born. These days, troy weight is used only for precious metals and gems, and the chaos is minimal. As for lead, a pound of it would actually hurt more than gold because lead, like feathers, uses the standard avoirdupois system. What's a little chaos among friends?
  12. 24 Jan '07 15:33
    Originally posted by HandyAndy
    The troy and avoirdupois weight systems were developed in Europe long before America was born. These days, troy weight is used only for precious metals and gems, and the chaos is minimal. As for lead, a pound of it would actually hurt [b]more than gold because lead, like feathers, uses the standard avoirdupois system. What's a little chaos among friends?[/b]
    I'm glad that I use the more unchaotic unit system. like the SI-system where a mass unit always is the same.
    A kg is is always a kg whatever you weigh.

    Heard at the Weigt Whatchers:
    - What do you weigh?
    - 55 kilogram.
    - Oh, you look heavier...?
    - Yes, but I use american kilograms.
  13. 24 Jan '07 22:52
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    I'm glad that I use the more unchaotic unit system. like the SI-system where a mass unit always is the same.
    A kg is is always a kg whatever you weigh.

    Heard at the Weigt Whatchers:
    - What do you weigh?
    - 55 kilogram.
    - Oh, you look heavier...?
    - Yes, but I use american kilograms.
    the SI system is used worldwide, so is troy pounds for gold.

    -how much do you weigh?
    -oh about 700kg
    -omg...pig
  14. 25 Jan '07 05:42
    Originally posted by Ason Pigg2
    the SI system is used worldwide, so is troy pounds for gold.

    -how much do you weigh?
    -oh about 700kg
    -omg...pig
    - How much is a troy pund?
    - It depends what you weigh.
    Make perfectly sense?

    - How much is a kilogram?
    - The same regardless what you weigh.
    Make perfectly sense!
  15. 25 Jan '07 08:57
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    I'm glad that I use the more unchaotic unit system. like the SI-system where a mass unit always is the same.
    A kg is is always a kg whatever you weigh.
    Well... yes, but we still measure the weight of precious stones in carats, not in milligrams. Think of it as something like that: there's a different measuring system for precious metals and for just about everything else. The difference is that in the rest of the world, the weigths are called something else, while in the USA (and in practice, though not in law, in the UK as well) they're both called pounds.

    If you want to have a go at the USAliens for having the wrong measurements, just mention that their pints are too small, the jessies!

    Richard