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Science Forum

  1. Standard member RBHILL
    Acts 13:48
    27 Sep '11 17:52
    People have estimated the universe to be: 40 Billion light years.

    That would be about 234,788,544,000,000,000,000,000 Miles.
    Two hundred thirty-four sextillion, seven hundred eighty-eight Quintillion, five hundred forty-four Quadrillion miles from one end to the other.


    186,000 x 86,400=16,070,400,000 x 365.25 going off over earths years:
    5,869,713,600,000*40 Billion= 2 to the 23rd.
  2. 27 Sep '11 18:17
    did they now
  3. 27 Sep '11 18:40
    What people?
  4. 27 Sep '11 19:07
    Estimated?
  5. 27 Sep '11 19:09
    Originally posted by RBHILL
    That would be about 234,788,544,000,000,000,000,000 Miles.
    It'll be even bigger if you give it to us in nm! Imagine how many transistors Intel could squeeze into that? Would a human brain that size be cleverer than God?
  6. Standard member Dasa
    Dasa
    29 Sep '11 01:21
    Originally posted by RBHILL
    People have estimated the universe to be: 40 Billion light years.

    That would be about 234,788,544,000,000,000,000,000 Miles.
    Two hundred thirty-four sextillion, seven hundred eighty-eight Quintillion, five hundred forty-four Quadrillion miles from one end to the other.


    186,000 x 86,400=16,070,400,000 x 365.25 going off over earths years:
    5,869,713,600,000*40 Billion= 2 to the 23rd.
    It is impossible to measure the size of the universe unless you know where the edge of the universe stops.
  7. Standard member usmc7257
    semper fi
    29 Sep '11 23:45
    Originally posted by Dasa
    It is impossible to measure the size of the universe unless you know where the edge of the universe stops.
    Somewhere, amolv06 is eating an animal.
  8. 30 Sep '11 00:06
    Originally posted by Dasa
    It is impossible to measure the size of the universe unless you know where the edge of the universe stops.
    why does it need to have an edge?

    If it curves back on itself it would be both finite and have no edges.

    And you could ascertain its approximate size from its curvature.


    Also usually when people talk about the size of the universe, they mean visible universe.
    Which has a visible edge.
    13.something billion light years away.
  9. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    30 Sep '11 00:23
    Originally posted by Dasa
    It is impossible to measure the size of the universe unless you know where the edge of the universe stops.
    When you walk on Earth how can you measure it? You can walk forever and not find the edge.
  10. Subscriber karoly aczel
    Happy Chappie
    30 Sep '11 01:21
    Is a black hole not an edge of sorts, or ... (?)
  11. 30 Sep '11 05:30
    Originally posted by googlefudge
    Also usually when people talk about the size of the universe, they mean visible universe.
    I certainly would never mean that.
  12. 30 Sep '11 11:34
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    I certainly would never mean that.
    Ok in physics discussions about the size of the universe are typically about the visible universe.

    Neither statement precludes you from only talking about the size of the entire universe.
  13. 30 Sep '11 11:41
    Originally posted by googlefudge
    Ok in physics discussions about the size of the universe are typically about the visible universe.
    I don't believe that. If there are multiple 'universes' then yes, most physics discussions regarding size would focus on the current one. However, if there are parts of the universe we reside in that we cannot ever see due to expansion being faster than the speed of light then those parts would be included in the phrase 'the size of the universe' unless clearly stated otherwise.
  14. 30 Sep '11 13:09
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    I don't believe that. If there are multiple 'universes' then yes, most physics discussions regarding size would focus on the current one. However, if there are parts of the universe we reside in that we cannot ever see due to expansion being faster than the speed of light then those parts would be included in the phrase 'the size of the universe' unless clearly stated otherwise.
    I really don't care if you believe it or not.

    It is true in my experience, which as there is no polling on the matter is all anyone can go on.

    It's mainly due to saying just 'universe' instead of 'visible universe', is easier.
    And physicists tend to be as lazy as the next guy when talking about stuff.
    Given that it is usually contextually apparent in the conversation which meaning you are using.

    Of course in papers and formal discussions the qualifier would typically be included.
  15. 30 Sep '11 14:57
    Originally posted by googlefudge
    I really don't care if you believe it or not.

    It is true in my experience, which as there is no polling on the matter is all anyone can go on.
    Can you give me at least one reference?