1. Joined
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    14 Jan '15 22:33
    How many species did Charles Darwin discover in his lifetime? And what, apart from evolution were his accomplishments in biology?
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    15 Jan '15 11:19
    Originally posted by catstorm
    How many species did Charles Darwin discover in his lifetime? And what, apart from evolution were his accomplishments in biology?
    Why does it matter? His biggest contribution to science by far was the Theory of Evolution.

    He did discover quite a number of species as he was part of a round the world expedition. He also studied marine invertebrates in quite some detail especially barnacles.
    He was also, according to Wikipedia, an eminent geologist and popular author.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Darwin
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    15 Jan '15 16:31
    It matters to me as a matter of scientific curiosity. Darwin is celebrated for his major achievements. His minor ones are also important. Every source says that he identified 'many' new species. I would like to know the number.
  4. Subscribersonhouse
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    15 Jan '15 17:22
    Originally posted by catstorm
    It matters to me as a matter of scientific curiosity. Darwin is celebrated for his major achievements. His minor ones are also important. Every source says that he identified 'many' new species. I would like to know the number.
    This article says 1539:

    http://darwin200.christs.cam.ac.uk/pages/index.php?page_id=c4

    He also did an 8 year study on barnacles and wrote a 4 volume set of books on the subject, still authoritative today.
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    15 Jan '15 17:34
    Thank you. I found it hard to come up with an exact figure or even an approximation.
  6. Standard memberwolfgang59
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    16 Jan '15 09:39
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    This article says 1539:

    1538
    Cats do not count.
  7. Cape Town
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    16 Jan '15 11:04
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    This article says 1539:
    No, that article says his catalogs list that many species. It says nothing about how many he discovered. He most likely cataloged many that were already known to science.
    The number he actually discovered probably changes with time as biologist tend to change their minds about where species boundaries lie as new information comes to light.
  8. Subscribersonhouse
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    16 Jan '15 13:02
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    No, that article says his catalogs list that many species. It says nothing about how many he discovered. He most likely cataloged many that were already known to science.
    The number he actually discovered probably changes with time as biologist tend to change their minds about where species boundaries lie as new information comes to light.
    That would be quite a job to separate those two, what did D discover V what other people already knew over 200 years ago.
  9. Cape Town
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    16 Jan '15 15:40
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    That would be quite a job to separate those two, what did D discover V what other people already knew over 200 years ago.
    That's always a problem in biology. Also its not so much what people already knew, but rather what 'science' knew, ie what species had been correctly described in a scientific manner.
    Its best not to try to put a figure on what he 'discovered', and just say he cataloged that many species.
  10. SubscriberAThousandYoung
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    Everything in South America pretty much
  11. Subscribersonhouse
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    19 Jan '15 18:01
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    Everything in South America pretty much
    Yeah, wasn't Darwin SUCH an evil man🙂
  12. Joined
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    20 Jan '15 16:04
    Yes, I am trying to remind people that Darwin did a lot of important scientific work. To many people he is just the guy who said, "monkeys turned into people."
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    20 Jan '15 18:48
    Originally posted by catstorm
    Yes, I am trying to remind people that Darwin did a lot of important scientific work. To many people he is just the guy who said, "monkeys turned into people."
    And even that he nicked from Wallace.
    Darwin is the Edison of biology.
  14. Subscribersonhouse
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    20 Jan '15 18:55
    Originally posted by Shallow Blue
    And even that he nicked from Wallace.
    Darwin is the Edison of biology.
    Who was wallace?
  15. Standard memberDeepThought
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    20 Jan '15 23:11
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Who was wallace?
    He led a rebellion against Edward I.
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