1. Joined
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    21 Mar '09 19:42
    Hi all,

    I need information about the distribution of the apparent magnitude of the stars - how many stars are brighter than magnitude 0, 1, 2, 3, etc. Googling didn't bring any useful results; maybe you will be luckier than me?

    Thanx 🙂
  2. Germany
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    21 Mar '09 19:45
    What do you need this for?
  3. Subscribersonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    slatington, pa, usa
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    21 Mar '09 21:09
    Originally posted by David113
    Hi all,

    I need information about the distribution of the apparent magnitude of the stars - how many stars are brighter than magnitude 0, 1, 2, 3, etc. Googling didn't bring any useful results; maybe you will be luckier than me?

    Thanx 🙂
    The apparent magnitude of stars is mainly a function of distance, the nearer ones are stronger by just proximity, Alpha Centauri is just an ordinary sun sized star that would be pretty much invisible 400 ly away, but 4 ly away and it's very bright. So the distribution by apparent magnitude would just be a log graph on average based on distance.
  4. Joined
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    21 Mar '09 22:011 edit
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    The apparent magnitude of stars is mainly a function of distance, the nearer ones are stronger by just proximity, Alpha Centauri is just an ordinary sun sized star that would be pretty much invisible 400 ly away, but 4 ly away and it's very bright. So the distribution by apparent magnitude would just be a log graph on average based on distance.
    That's fine, but I want the actual numbers - say, how many stars are brighter than magnitude n for each integer n between 0 and 15.

    OK, I just found this:
    http://www.vaughns-1-pagers.com/science/star-magnitude.htm
  5. Subscribersonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    slatington, pa, usa
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    22 Mar '09 14:22
    Originally posted by David113
    That's fine, but I want the actual numbers - say, how many stars are brighter than magnitude n for each integer n between 0 and 15.

    OK, I just found this:
    http://www.vaughns-1-pagers.com/science/star-magnitude.htm
    Good general science page, I bookmarked it. He did make one mistake, called Uranus the dimmest star visible with naked eye. Uranus of course being a planet not a star. But he just said 'hundreds' when he listed the stars at a certain magnitude, I think you wanted actual #'s, not just an estimate.
  6. Standard memberDeepThought
    Losing the Thread
    Cosmopolis
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    23 Mar '09 15:18
    This is a list of the top 80 odd stars by apparent magnitude:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_brightest_stars

    If you hunt around you should be able to get the information you want from a star catalogue. Try looking here:

    http://adc.gsfc.nasa.gov/adc/sciencedata.html
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