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Science Forum

  1. 08 Aug '17 12:23
    Hi all,

    Not sure if this is too low-brow for this forum, but I was just wondering if anyone is using an electric car currently and if so, how are they coping with the range issues etc?

    Are there other faults or issues that they are finding with them?

    Thanks
    Paul
  2. 09 Aug '17 09:10 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by @paul-a-roberts
    Hi all,

    Not sure if this is too low-brow for this forum, but I was just wondering if anyone is using an electric car currently and if so, how are they coping with the range issues etc?

    Are there other faults or issues that they are finding with them?

    Thanks
    Paul
    Electric cars are coming. Sooner or later there are no fossil car left, they will all be electric.

    The problem is not about electric car technology. It's about infrastructure and that has to do with political decisions.

    Study the Norway example where the transformation of a fossil fleet to a electric car fleet is rapid. All due to politicians who know their job. Iceland is also coming country in this aspect.

    https://electrek.co/2017/07/04/electric-car-norway-tesla-model-x/ : "Electric cars reach record 42% of Norway’s total new car sales..."
  3. 09 Aug '17 10:36 / 7 edits
    One thing that would help make it economically easier to have all cars electric is if practical MgS (magnesium-sulfur) batteries, which should have greater energy density than lithium-ion batteries, are developed to replace Li (lithium) batteries. This is because magnesium and sulfur are much cheaper and more readily available than the much rarer lithium.

    Practical MgS batteries should also be much cheaper than Li batteries for all applications and most notably for the application of off-the-grid energy storage which would help counter the intermittentness of renewable power.

    Given its fantastic potential, it is therefore a complete mystery to me why relatively extremely few researchers are showing interest in or researching the development of practical MgS batteries and so far only a pathetically small amount of research has been done in them and not nearly enough to have any effective breakthrough; does anyone know why?
  4. 09 Aug '17 20:28
    Originally posted by @humy
    One thing that would help make it economically easier to have all cars electric is if practical MgS (magnesium-sulfur) batteries, which should have greater energy density than lithium-ion batteries, are developed to replace Li (lithium) batteries. This is because magnesium and sulfur are much cheaper and more readily available than the much rarer lithium.

    ...[text shortened]... een done in them and not nearly enough to have any effective breakthrough; does anyone know why?
    "lack of appropriate cathode materials" according to https://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms14083
  5. 09 Aug '17 21:27
    Originally posted by @wildgrass
    "lack of appropriate cathode materials" according to https://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms14083
    I presume that is a result of lack of research.
  6. 09 Aug '17 22:54 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by @paul-a-roberts
    Hi all,

    Not sure if this is too low-brow for this forum, but I was just wondering if anyone is using an electric car currently and if so, how are they coping with the range issues etc?

    Are there other faults or issues that they are finding with them?

    Thanks
    Paul
    The problem for me is not finding a car that can hold a charge long, the problem is finding a long enough extension cord to get to work and back.
  7. 10 Aug '17 00:53
    How long will the batteries last?

    Most places I've read says about 100k to 150k. As the battery gets older, the distance you can travel on a charge decreases. Seems to me that electric cars means vast numbers of worn out batteries.
  8. 10 Aug '17 15:33
    Originally posted by @humy
    I presume that is a result of lack of research.
    Yeah. That is the thing about research. It's never where you want it to be. If it was, no research would be needed. A cure for cancer would be nice too. .....
  9. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    11 Aug '17 13:41
    Originally posted by @eladar
    How long will the batteries last?

    Most places I've read says about 100k to 150k. As the battery gets older, the distance you can travel on a charge decreases. Seems to me that electric cars means vast numbers of worn out batteries.
    That may be the case now but ten years from now when electrics get serious some of those issues will be engineered out, like the MgS battery Humy touts.
  10. 11 Aug '17 16:39
    Originally posted by @sonhouse
    That may be the case now but ten years from now when electrics get serious some of those issues will be engineered out, like the MgS battery Humy touts.
    Do you have a crystal ball?
  11. Subscriber ogb
    11 Aug '17 18:29
    Originally posted by @humy
    One thing that would help make it economically easier to have all cars electric is if practical MgS (magnesium-sulfur) batteries, which should have greater energy density than lithium-ion batteries, are developed to replace Li (lithium) batteries. This is because magnesium and sulfur are much cheaper and more readily available than the much rarer lithium.

    ...[text shortened]... een done in them and not nearly enough to have any effective breakthrough; does anyone know why?
    uhh, maybe the oil industry is against any other form of energy???
  12. 17 Aug '17 14:09
    Originally posted by @fabianfnas
    Electric cars are coming. Sooner or later there are no fossil car left, they will all be electric.

    The problem is not about electric car technology. It's about infrastructure and that has to do with political decisions.

    Study the Norway example where the transformation of a fossil fleet to a electric car fleet is rapid. All due to politicians who k ...[text shortened]... -car-norway-tesla-model-x/ : "Electric cars reach record 42% of Norway’s total new car sales..."
    Don't get ahead of yourself. Even if all electricity became free of fossil fuel burning there is the possibility that hydrogen could be produced directly from solar or other renewable sources.
    Batteries are expensive and in some cases dangerous. I am hopeful that will change some day but that is difficult to be sure of.
  13. 17 Aug '17 23:07 / 2 edits
    I think countries that lack the natural resouces want to push for electric cars. For them fuel is a drain on the economy.

    Electric cars would increase the demand for the electricity they can prodice,even if it means nuclear power plants. It's good for the economy.
  14. 21 Aug '17 18:12
    Originally posted by @eladar
    How long will the batteries last?

    Most places I've read says about 100k to 150k. As the battery gets older, the distance you can travel on a charge decreases. Seems to me that electric cars means vast numbers of worn out batteries.
    I bought a new Honda Civic Hybrid in 2003, which cost $4000 more than a non-hybrid model. I have replaced the battery twice in 230,000 miles, at a cost of $3000 each time. Not only does that wipe out all the money saved on gas, the second and third batteries were the exact same models as the original. No improved technology in 14 years. Add in the dirty little secret that producing the batteries also consumes fossil fuels, and you have to doubt the real value of hybrid or electric vehicles. The car still runs like a top, though, gets 48 mpg, and I've never had a problem with the hybrid system.
  15. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    22 Aug '17 20:15
    Originally posted by @eladar
    Do you have a crystal ball?
    No but I have a couple biological ones....