1. Cosmos
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    11 Nov '18 20:07
    so what's taking so long to find one? And no..a Gravitational wave is NOT the same thing
  2. Subscribersonhouse
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    12 Nov '18 00:421 edit
    @ogb said
    so what's taking so long to find one? And no..a Gravitational wave is NOT the same thing
    We actually knew that😉 And the reason they haven't been found is perhaps they just don't exist. BTW, there are gravity waves like in the atmosphere and there are gravitational waves like LIGO detected.
  3. Standard memberwolfgang59
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    12 Nov '18 05:22
    @ogb said
    so what's taking so long to find one? And no..a Gravitational wave is NOT the same thing
    Lazy scientists.
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    12 Nov '18 07:57
    @sonhouse said
    We actually knew that😉 And the reason they haven't been found is perhaps they just don't exist. BTW, there are gravity waves like in the atmosphere and there are gravitational waves like LIGO detected.
    If gravitons don't exist what is waving?
  5. Standard memberDeepThought
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    12 Nov '18 14:02
    @metal-brain said
    If gravitons don't exist what is waving?
    Other than that the other forces we observe are quantized there is no real evidence for gravitons. However, whether gravity is quantized or not what "waves" is the metric tensor. Classical General Relativity predicts gravitational waves without needing to be quantized.
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    12 Nov '18 14:23
    @deepthought said
    Other than that the other forces we observe are quantized there is no real evidence for gravitons. However, whether gravity is quantized or not what "waves" is the metric tensor. Classical General Relativity predicts gravitational waves without needing to be quantized.
    I expected someone to say it is space-time itself that is waving. I have never heard anyone claim it is the metric tensor. A metric tensor is a measurement of a field. It cannot possibly wave.

    You seem to be hung up on the metric tensor for some strange reason. It seems like anything you cannot answer you claim it is a metric tensor.
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    16 Nov '18 14:19
    @metal-brain said
    I expected someone to say it is space-time itself that is waving
    Neither the graviton nor the space-time waves - the mind waves. Thus sayeth the tortoise to Achilles.
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    17 Nov '18 02:48
    @shallow-blue said
    Neither the graviton nor the space-time waves - the mind waves. Thus sayeth the tortoise to Achilles.
    Gravitational waves were discovered. Something is waving.
  9. Standard memberDeepThought
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    17 Nov '18 18:22
    @metal-brain said
    I expected someone to say it is space-time itself that is waving. I have never heard anyone claim it is the metric tensor. A metric tensor is a measurement of a field. It cannot possibly wave.

    You seem to be hung up on the metric tensor for some strange reason. It seems like anything you cannot answer you claim it is a metric tensor.
    Well, that's because the metric tensor completely describes the field (actually it overdescribes it). In your final sentence you made a statement that cannot be correct - that because the metric tensor is a measurement of a field it cannot wave. The first problem is that it is not a measurement of a field, it is a description. The second, and rather more severe, problem is that the field patently changes, otherwise there could be no dynamics at all, nothing that gravitates could move otherwise it would alter your static field. An alternative sense of your statement is that the measurement cannot change, but a measurement happens, as an idealisation, at a particular point and a particular time. Successive measurements would reveal an oscillation, the metric describes this but is not in itself a measurement.
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    18 Nov '18 12:29
    @deepthought said
    Well, that's because the metric tensor completely describes the field (actually it overdescribes it). In your final sentence you made a statement that cannot be correct - that because the metric tensor is a measurement of a field it cannot wave. The first problem is that it is not a measurement of a field, it is a description. The second, and rather more severe, proble ...[text shortened]... surements would reveal an oscillation, the metric describes this but is not in itself a measurement.
    A description cannot possibly wave. You are still making no sense.
  11. Standard memberDeepThought
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    22 Nov '18 06:01
    @metal-brain said
    A description cannot possibly wave. You are still making no sense.
    Stop trying to be clever, you're no good at it.
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    22 Nov '18 14:20
    @deepthought said
    Stop trying to be clever, you're no good at it.
    It is called logic. Try it sometime.

    I can describe waves in the water. Is it the description that is waving or the water? It is the water.

    A description cannot possibly wave. You are still making no sense.
  13. Standard memberDeepThought
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    22 Nov '18 14:27
    @metal-brain said
    It is called logic. Try it sometime.

    I can describe waves in the water. Is it the description that is waving or the water? It is the water.

    A description cannot possibly wave. You are still making no sense.
    If the description does not have propagating oscillations in it then it's a bad description, so both if you think about it.
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    22 Nov '18 14:30
    @deepthought said
    If the description does not have propagating oscillations in it then it's a bad description, so both if you think about it.
    You know better. You really should give it up.
  15. Standard memberwolfgang59
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    22 Nov '18 18:43
    @metal-brain said
    It is called logic. Try it sometime.

    I can describe waves in the water. Is it the description that is waving or the water? It is the water.

    A description cannot possibly wave. You are still making no sense.
    You think gravitons would be analogous to water particles in a wave?
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