1. Standard memberThequ1ck
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    15 Feb '13 11:00
    Humans underwent rapid evolution about 5 million years ago that
    dramatically differentiated us from chimps by enhancing the intra-cellular structures in the brain to allow for greater intelligence/adaptability.

    It was discovered that (A) or thymine (T) changed consistently to cytosine (C) or guanine (G) over relatively small sections of non-coding DNA.
    This is called a weak-to-strong bias. The regions which these events occurred
    are referred to as HAR's (Human accelerated regions).
    As yet, no explanation has been offered for these substitutions.

    Looking at HAR1, we can see that there is only 1 substitution
    between an ape and a chicken but 18 between an ape and a human.

    "The HAR1 region showed the greatest variance in humans. It is a 118 base pair DNA
    segment with 18 bases that differ from the same region in the other species. From
    an evolutionary point of view less than one (0.27) base change(s) is expected in
    the HAR1 DNA sequence in the time elapsed since chimps and humans diverged from their
    common ancestor. Eighteen changes in human HAR1 equates to 67 times the number of changes expected."

    "HAR1 extends over 1.2 kb,
    a region far larger than HAR1 itself. Such changes, which also appear to
    characterize the HARs as a group, undoubtedly serve to strengthen RNA helices
    against dissociation and may promote enhanced expression or stability.
    Nevertheless, the weakto-strong bias in HAR1 nucleotide substitutions remains
    unexplained."

    "By definition, there’s enough time because the evolutionary rate is calculated
    by determining the number of changes between the common ancestor of humans and
    chimps and then dividing that number by 6 million years—the amount of time that
    has elapsed since the divergence of humans and chimps. To put it another way,
    “the deck is rigged.” So, of course, there’s enough time (from the evolutionary
    perspective) for humans to have evolved from chimps. Or is there? Perhaps not always,
    even when using a rigged deck.

    Additionally, the equivalent of HAR1 in all those other species is very highly conserved.
    The researchers report that “only two bases (out of 118) are changed between chimpanzee
    and chicken.” There are some attempts in the scientific literature to explain the phenomena
    of “accelerated evolution.” However, HAR1 doesn’t fit into the explanations being offered2
    because it is so highly conserved.3 In addition to the astonishing number of changes in human
    HAR1, the changes reflect GC-biased conversion, another unexpected phenomena in which
    adenine (A) or thymine (T) change consistently to cytosine (C) or guanine (G)."

    http://www.reasons.org/articles/articles/becoming-human%E2%80%94fast

    Further reading :
    http://ezinearticles.com/?HAR1---The-Special-Human-Gene-and-Why-it-Could-Be-the-Real-Pandoras-Box&id=4748079
    http://www.csm.org.uk/news.php?viewmessage=64
    http://users.soe.ucsc.edu/~sol/posters/har1poster.pdf
    http://www.walshlab.org/uploads/publications/50/brain_evolution_and_uniqueness_in_the_human_genome.pdf

    To me, this is one of the most interesting areas in modern day biology as
    it not only underlines the sheer complexity of the human brain and it's
    susceptibility to even the smallest changes in DNA but shows that our
    evolution is not linear by any means.

    The most intriguing question to come from this is how did it happen?
    What selective forces came into play to cause this accelerated evolution
    and how were so many changes made on such highly conserved regions
    of DNA??
  2. Subscribersonhouse
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    15 Feb '13 11:29
    Originally posted by Thequ1ck
    Humans underwent rapid evolution about 5 million years ago that
    dramatically differentiated us from chimps by enhancing the intra-cellular structures in the brain to allow for greater intelligence/adaptability.

    It was discovered that (A) or thymine (T) changed consistently to cytosine (C) or guanine (G) over relatively small sections of non-coding DN ...[text shortened]... evolution
    and how were so many changes made on such highly conserved regions
    of DNA??
    Here is another recent piece about a genetic mutation that made east Asians different from the rest of the human population, a mutation they traced back 35,000 years!:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/15/science/studying-recent-human-evolution-at-the-genetic-level.html?_r=0
  3. Standard memberRJHinds
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    15 Feb '13 23:181 edit
    Originally posted by Thequ1ck
    Humans underwent rapid evolution about 5 million years ago that
    dramatically differentiated us from chimps by enhancing the intra-cellular structures in the brain to allow for greater intelligence/adaptability.

    It was discovered that (A) or thymine (T) changed consistently to cytosine (C) or guanine (G) over relatively small sections of non-coding DN evolution
    and how were so many changes made on such highly conserved regions
    of DNA??
    God created man that way a little ove 6,000 years ago. That 5 million figure was just pulled out of someone's arse. 😏
  4. Standard memberRJHinds
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    15 Feb '13 23:21
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Here is another recent piece about a genetic mutation that made east Asians different from the rest of the human population, a mutation they traced back 35,000 years!:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/15/science/studying-recent-human-evolution-at-the-genetic-level.html?_r=0
    That 35,000 figure is another figure someone just pulled out of their arse, like a magic trick. 😏
  5. Standard memberThequ1ck
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    16 Feb '13 00:39
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    That 35,000 figure is another figure someone just pulled out of their arse, like a magic trick. 😏
    If you read the original post, there's a good argument for intelligent design
    or at least improvement. Maybe the creationists got the figures wrong and it was 5 million, not 5 thousand years ago. Throwing you a bone here Hinds.
  6. Standard memberRJHinds
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    16 Feb '13 03:21
    Originally posted by Thequ1ck
    If you read the original post, there's a good argument for intelligent design
    or at least improvement. Maybe the creationists got the figures wrong and it was 5 million, not 5 thousand years ago. Throwing you a bone here Hinds.
    I got all the bones I need. 😏
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    16 Feb '13 16:05
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    I got all the bones I need. 😏
    You also have a piece of intestine you don't need, the Appendix.A very badly positioned blind spot on the Retina.Less than well designed backbone for upright walking to mention but a few design flaws, what was god thinking?
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    16 Feb '13 16:09
    Originally posted by OdBod
    You also have a piece of intestine you don't need, the Appendix.A very badly positioned blind spot on the Retina.Less than well designed backbone for upright walking to mention but a few design flaws, what was god thinking?
    The best one is the "Recurrent laryngeal nerve" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recurrent_laryngeal_nerve
    Which goes from the base of the brain, down around the heart, and up to the larynx.

    It does so in all land animals... including giraffes...

    Talk about stupid 'design'.
  9. Subscribersonhouse
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    16 Feb '13 19:16
    Originally posted by googlefudge
    The best one is the "Recurrent laryngeal nerve" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recurrent_laryngeal_nerve
    Which goes from the base of the brain, down around the heart, and up to the larynx.

    It does so in all land animals... including giraffes...

    Talk about stupid 'design'.
    And then there is the prostate gland, wrapped around the urethra. Is that your god's way of saying, you'll get it sooner or later, I want you to have this end run timer, a sword of Damocles just waiting to go off. What kind of design choice is that?
  10. Standard memberRJHinds
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    16 Feb '13 20:42
    Originally posted by googlefudge
    The best one is the "Recurrent laryngeal nerve" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recurrent_laryngeal_nerve
    Which goes from the base of the brain, down around the heart, and up to the larynx.

    It does so in all land animals... including giraffes...

    Talk about stupid 'design'.
    Maybe that is were Evil-lution took over. 😏
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    16 Feb '13 20:55
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    And then there is the prostate gland, wrapped around the urethra. Is that your god's way of saying, you'll get it sooner or later, I want you to have this end run timer, a sword of Damocles just waiting to go off. What kind of design choice is that?
    Why so many toes AND with nails, can ruin your socks!!!!
  12. Standard memberThequ1ck
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    16 Feb '13 21:00
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    I got all the bones I need. 😏
    Well this is clear evidence of 'how' humans separated from apes in a very
    short time-period. It goes some ways to explaining why we have relatively few
    missing link samples.

    However, it doesn't explain 'why' it occurred. That is still open to debate even from
    a creationist standpoint.
  13. Standard memberThequ1ck
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    16 Feb '13 21:03
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Here is another recent piece about a genetic mutation that made east Asians different from the rest of the human population, a mutation they traced back 35,000 years!:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/15/science/studying-recent-human-evolution-at-the-genetic-level.html?_r=0
    An interesting concept of how a genetic change in the number of sweat glands
    can have secondary effects on hair and breast types.

    Chicken and egg scenario, did the sweat gland increase necessitate the hair/breast
    changes or vice versa?
  14. Standard memberRJHinds
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    16 Feb '13 21:321 edit
    Originally posted by Thequ1ck
    Well this is clear evidence of 'how' humans separated from apes in a very
    short time-period. It goes some ways to explaining why we have relatively few
    missing link samples.

    However, it doesn't explain 'why' it occurred. That is still open to debate even from
    a creationist standpoint.
    Why? You ask why? After making all the physical creatures that were goining to reproduce after their own kind and fill the earth and the seas, the Word or Son of God, had another idea. He said, "Let us make man in our likeness."

    That explains why. There was no links at all. So how could we find missing links?
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    16 Feb '13 21:43
    Originally posted by Thequ1ck
    An interesting concept of how a genetic change in the number of sweat glands
    can have secondary effects on hair and breast types.

    Chicken and egg scenario, did the sweat gland increase necessitate the hair/breast
    changes or vice versa?
    I believe it involved slow incremental changes similar to the development of a complex eye .
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