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  1. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    01 Jun '15 12:22
    http://phys.org/news/2015-06-astronomers-real-time-d-movies-plasma.html

    She is very erudite in the explanation of these ionosphere tubes now shown in 3D, and she doesn't even have her Phd yet. I imagine that won't be long now! Really nice work!

    One thing I see about the instrument, it has taken 3D images of the plasma tubes but only in a rather small spot on the Earth, the volume directly above the radio telescope. Even though it has a wide analysis angle, it is clear more such instruments will be needed around the world to get the full picture of these newly discovered plasma tubes.

    AND she is beautiful
  2. 01 Jun '15 14:40
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    http://phys.org/news/2015-06-astronomers-real-time-d-movies-plasma.html

    She is very erudite in the explanation of these ionosphere tubes now shown in 3D, and she doesn't even have her Phd yet. I imagine that won't be long now! Really nice work!

    One thing I see about the instrument, it has taken 3D images of the plasma tubes but only in a rather smal ...[text shortened]... world to get the full picture of these newly discovered plasma tubes.

    AND she is beautiful
    Yes, she is beautiful. But that has nothing, repeat: nothing, to do with her skills as an astronomer.

    What she has done has nothing to do with her gender. Noone should say that "For a girl she is a good astonomer." She is good regardless of her sex. She is good because she is ... good!

    She has produced marvelous 3D pictures of until now never seen structures because her new way of thinking. She can very well be a model for other young people to achieve similar things, the field is open for anyone to explore. Boys and girls, men and women, go and do marvelous things!
  3. 01 Jun '15 15:26
    Yeah, general rule... If you wouldn't say it about a guy, you don't say it about a girl.

    This is a cool bit of science that stands on it's own merit.
  4. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    01 Jun '15 15:42
    Originally posted by googlefudge
    Yeah, general rule... If you wouldn't say it about a guy, you don't say it about a girl.

    This is a cool bit of science that stands on it's own merit.
    I just wish I was 50 years younger
  5. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    01 Jun '15 15:44 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    Yes, she is beautiful. But that has nothing, repeat: nothing, to do with her skills as an astronomer.

    What she has done has nothing to do with her gender. Noone should say that "For a girl she is a good astonomer." She is good regardless of her sex. She is good because she is ... good!

    She has produced marvelous 3D pictures of until now never seen s ...[text shortened]... field is open for anyone to explore. Boys and girls, men and women, go and do marvelous things!
    I would never say 'she is good, for a girl'. I just liked her instantly It would have been good science if it had come from an Australian Aborigine! I think her Phd is assured.

    Hey googlefudge, could you take a look at my post in posers and puzzles, the one about converting algebraic to RPN? I worked up a nice equation that on my TI86 solves for either of the three variables, S, distance, T, time, and A, acceleration. In this case, Acceleration in feet per second squared, distance in miles and time in days. This formula is for space travel where you want to accelerate at X amount but only to half way then DEcelerate the rest of the way so you end up at the other end with zero relative velocity so you can do things like actually land instead of flying by at 1000 miles per second Eventually propulsion is going to exceed modern chemical rockets and my formula can tell how long it takes to get from point A to point B in the solar system. It is easy to mod the formula to make it metric also. But I want to shove that one into my HP48 which is RPN but not sure exactly the best route to do the stacks and so forth.
  6. 02 Jun '15 22:08 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by googlefudge
    Yeah, general rule... If you wouldn't say it about a guy, you don't say it about a girl.

    This is a cool bit of science that stands on it's own merit.
    "If you wouldn't say it about a guy, you don't say it about a girl."
    --Googlefudge

    So one couldn't say that a woman gave birth because one "wouldn't say it about a guy"?
    Could a woman talk about her new dress even though her husband wears nothing similar?
  7. 03 Jun '15 04:04
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    "If you wouldn't say it about a guy, you don't say it about a girl."
    --Googlefudge

    So one couldn't say that a woman gave birth because one "wouldn't say it about a guy"?
    Could a woman talk about her new dress even though her husband wears nothing similar?
    I understood Mr Googlefudge perfectly. You didn't.

    I've seen journalists interviewing female researching wanting more to talk about her relationship with her boyfriend than her actual scientific achievements that she actually was there to talk about. The journalist wouldn't do the same if it was a male scientist he was to interview.

    How has this to do with your examples...?
  8. 03 Jun '15 06:22
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    I understood Mr Googlefudge perfectly. You didn't.

    I've seen journalists interviewing female researching wanting more to talk about her relationship with her boyfriend than her actual scientific achievements that she actually was there to talk about. The journalist wouldn't do the same if it was a male scientist he was to interview.

    How has this to do with your examples...?
    That depends on the circumstances. Nobody can ask Max Born about Olivia Newton John since he is dead, but if he was alive I'm sure he would get a lot of questions about his grand daughter. Now imagine a female pop star who has a boyfriend that is a physicist.
  9. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    03 Jun '15 15:26
    Originally posted by Metal Brain
    That depends on the circumstances. Nobody can ask Max Born about Olivia Newton John since he is dead, but if he was alive I'm sure he would get a lot of questions about his grand daughter. Now imagine a female pop star who has a boyfriend that is a physicist.
    Well, my daughter HAS a physicist for a boyfriend, they actually got married. I don't think anyone has asked her that question, because mainly she has a large number of friends. They both live in Brazil and both teach at the Federal University, she in music and he in physics.
  10. 03 Jun '15 17:29
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Well, my daughter HAS a physicist for a boyfriend, they actually got married. I don't think anyone has asked her that question, because mainly she has a large number of friends. They both live in Brazil and both teach at the Federal University, she in music and he in physics.
    When I have something important to say and the only thing I get back is that "Your have improved in English!" Well, I am flattered, of course, but didn't they listen of what what I just said?

    The same goes for women scientists. A woman gives an explanation of a mystery phenomenon and gets the remark "Wow, you are beautiful!" Well, she is flattered, of course, but didn't they listen anything what she just explained?

    I say that the message is more important than the gender, appearance, religion, ethnicity, and other non important things else than the message itself.
  11. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    03 Jun '15 19:13
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    When I have something important to say and the only thing I get back is that "Your have improved in English!" Well, I am flattered, of course, but didn't they listen of what what I just said?

    The same goes for women scientists. A woman gives an explanation of a mystery phenomenon and gets the remark "Wow, you are beautiful!" Well, she is flattered, of ...[text shortened]... r, appearance, religion, ethnicity, and other non important things else than the message itself.
    I certainly didn't forget her message for one minute, I followed the development of that radio telescope since they started with antenna #1. One of the first tests when there were only a few antenna's used, they picked up the signal from the Voyager, now about 5 billion miles away. I was totally surprised a few stick antenna's like that could be that sensitive. The sticks I just mentioned are dipole, 2 each for each antenna and now there are dozens of them in a kind of random array in the desert.

    This latest result is one that could have been done ONLY by this radio telescope. I think they need to build a dozen just like it scattered around the globe now that they can see these plasma tubes, it was clear from the image the antenna array was limited in it's angular resolution or limited by the curvature of Earth or both. So to get a more detailed map of the tubes more of them need to be built around the planet.

    And besides all that, she is STILL beautiful

    I remember as a kid in Denver, watching a chess match between two girls, one an ok looking girl with total concentration on the board, the other this girl, a beautiful Danish looking blonde, playing her moves quickly, then going back to her differential calculus homework I was in awe!
  12. 03 Jun '15 20:51 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    I understood Mr Googlefudge perfectly. You didn't.

    I've seen journalists interviewing female researching wanting more to talk about her relationship with her boyfriend than her actual scientific achievements that she actually was there to talk about. The journalist wouldn't do the same if it was a male scientist he was to interview.

    How has this to do with your examples...?
    Do I have to attach an explicit 'THIS IS A JOKE' label to my post (to Googlefudge) so
    someone as dim as FabianFrias might comprehend it?

    I already am well aware of sexism. (At RHP some trolls have liked to attack me personally
    because they presume that I must be extremely repulsive in appearance, which is 'interesting'
    considering the fact that they never have seen me.) I know that the ChessBase website
    often likes to emphasize a woman's attractiveness rather than her strength at chess.
    Sometimes I have wondered (THIS IS A JOKE) if ChessBase would sponsor a swimsuit
    competition among women chess players.

    I would say that a science journalist who's more interested in a female scientist's romantic
    life than in her scientific work is not a good science journalist. But the quality of journalism
    is often disappointing. I have been asked some extremely ignorant or irrelevant questions
    by journalists, and I attributed their poor questions to incompetence rather than to sexism.
  13. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    03 Jun '15 21:25
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    Do I have to attach an explicit 'THIS IS A JOKE' label to my post (to Googlefudge) so
    someone as dim as FabianFrias might comprehend it?

    I already am well aware of sexism. (At RHP some trolls have liked to attack me personally
    because they presume that I must be extremely repulsive in appearance, which is 'interesting'
    considering the fact that the ...[text shortened]... ns
    by journalists, and I attributed their poor questions to incompetence rather than to sexism.
    Or prurient interest. I wonder which is worse? Like the dude is implying 'tell me all the dark secrets of your love life', Er, I thought we were talking about my dissertion....
  14. 03 Jun '15 23:53 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Or prurient interest. I wonder which is worse? Like the dude is implying 'tell me all the dark secrets of your love life',
    Er, I thought we were talking about my dissertion....
    While I oppose sexism, sometimes I have to be pragmatic about sex-linked perceptions.

    I was once advising a university foreign student group that had become active in protesting
    some oppressive policies by the government of their home country. I told them that, to
    be realistic, the media hardly was going to care about the facts of such oppressive policies.
    In general, journalists did not know or care anything about what was happening in their country.
    To have a better chance of media coverage, the student group should appoint, I suggested,
    its most charming attractive young woman (even though she was not one of its major political
    players) as its spokesperson. If she could build some rapport with (wishfully dreaming)
    male journalists, then it would more likely the student group could get its message heard.
    In particular, television coverage would be drawn more toward a photogenic young woman.

    I can understand why a young woman would find it distasteful to flirt with or perhaps even
    to appear to be receptive to the advances of (much older) male journalists, but if one
    believes that one's cause is important enough, then may be a sacrifice worth making.
    As I recall, this student group got considerable attention and sympathy for a while before
    the news cycle changed and it became ignored by the media. In the meantime, the
    group's spokeswoman had to deal with requests for dates from some smitten journalists.
  15. Standard member DeepThought
    Losing the Thread
    04 Jun '15 02:40
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    While I oppose sexism, sometimes I have to be pragmatic about sex-linked perceptions.

    I was once advising a university foreign student group that had become active in protesting
    some oppressive policies by the government of their home country. I told them that, to
    be realistic, the media hardly was going to care about the facts of such oppressive po ...[text shortened]... ime, the
    group's spokeswoman had to deal with requests for dates from some smitten journalists.
    That's why they call 'em dirty hacks.

    Regarding your earlier post, there are a few men (apart from the Scottish) who rebel and wear dresses - it doesn't seem to cause them great problems.