1. Standard memberwoodypusher
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    06 Dec '13 22:28
    11 times larger than Jupiter. 650 times farther from their host star than Earth to our Sun; more than 20 times farther than Neptune. Surface temperature is 2,732 degrees - several hundred degrees hotter than Earth's CORE:

    http://www.cbsnews.com/news/massive-alien-planet-discovered-astronomers-puzzled/
  2. Standard memberwoodypusher
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    06 Dec '13 22:30
    ...waiting for RJHinds' comment about the 'exaggerated' size and distance of this planet ;-)
  3. Subscribersonhouse
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    07 Dec '13 00:345 edits
    Originally posted by woodypusher
    11 times larger than Jupiter. 650 times farther from their host star than Earth to our Sun; more than 20 times farther than Neptune. Surface temperature is 2,732 degrees - several hundred degrees hotter than Earth's CORE:

    http://www.cbsnews.com/news/massive-alien-planet-discovered-astronomers-puzzled/
    Doesn't that make it brown dwarf? It is clearly generating its own heat, it would be getting around 3 milliwatts per square meter from the host sun.

    If it is 11 times BIGGER than Jupiter, that makes it about the same size as our sun. It is just short of fusion, been shortchanged in the energy department.

    If the host sun is about the same brightness as our sun this 'planet' would be receiving something like 8 E18 watts spread out over its surface even at 3 milliwatts per square meter. That is not enough to heat it up to 2,000 degrees +. I assume that is celsius.

    It would have to be being heated by gravitational contraction.
  4. Joined
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    07 Dec '13 01:181 edit
    Not 11 times bigger... 11 times more massive than Jupiter... [according to the article]

    Astronomers recently discovered an exoplanet that is the size of 11 Jupiters


    Which still probably puts it into is it/isn't it territory for a brown dwarf. [A later reclassification
    wouldn't shock me any]

    2,732 degrees Fahrenheit according to the article...

    Which is quite a lot less than the Earth's core... estimated at 9800~11000 Fahrenheit
    Or roughly the same temperature of the surface of the sun. (possibly even hotter)


    I suspect this is a case of 'journalist doesn't know what they're talking about' syndrome.

    Need the actual press release, if there is one... Or reporting from a more reliable source.

    Because what's in that article is mostly junk by the looks of it.


    EDIT:
    http://www.natureworldnews.com/articles/5201/20131205/massive-newfound-planet-defies-traditional-planetary-formation-theories.htm

    http://phys.org/news/2013-12-astronomers-planet-shouldnt.html

    .......

    At only 13 million years old, this young planet still glows from the residual heat of its formation. Because at 2,700 Fahrenheit (about 1,500 degrees Celsius) the planet is much cooler than its host star, it emits most of its energy as infrared rather than visible light. Earth, by comparison, formed 4.5 billion years ago and is thus about 350 times older than HD 106906 b.

    Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-12-astronomers-planet-shouldnt.html#jCp

    .............

    Weighing in at 11 times Jupiter's mass and orbiting its star at 650 times the average Earth-Sun distance, planet HD 106906 b is unlike anything in our own Solar System and throws a wrench in planet formation theories.

    Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-12-astronomers-planet-shouldnt.html#jCp

    ...........


    Link to abstract and article for publication (advanced copy)

    Abstract

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1312.1265


    Full Article.

    http://arxiv.org/pdf/1312.1265v1.pdf



    And now I have just done more research, and am better informed than the actual 'journalist'
    who wrote the article in the op.
    Who is a clueless moron who shouldn't be writing about science stories they clearly don't understand.
  5. Standard memberwoodypusher
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    07 Dec '13 07:541 edit
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Doesn't that make it brown dwarf? It is clearly generating its own heat, it would be getting around 3 milliwatts per square meter from the host sun.

    If it is 11 times BIGGER than Jupiter, that makes it about the same size as our sun. It is just short of fusion, been shortchanged in the energy department.

    If the host sun is about the same brightness as ...[text shortened]... s +. I assume that is celsius.

    It would have to be being heated by gravitational contraction.
    Yeah, considering its size and temperature, maybe it could be mistaken for a binary star system. I'm pretty sure though they know what they're talking about...maybe not the author though as you and googlefudge pointed out.
  6. Standard memberwoodypusher
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    07 Dec '13 07:57
    I looked it up and Jupiters mass is 1,000th of our sun:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jupiter
  7. Standard memberwoodypusher
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    07 Dec '13 08:00
    ["...difference between the masses of two stars in a binary system is typically no more than a ratio of 10 to 1.

    "In our case, the mass ratio is more than 100-to-1," Bailey said. "This extreme mass ratio is not predicted from binary star formation theories — just like planet formation theory predicts that we cannot form planets so far from the host star."]


    http://www.nbcnews.com/science/enormous-alien-planet-discovered-most-distant-orbit-ever-seen-2D11703497?ocid=ansmsnbc11
  8. Cape Town
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    07 Dec '13 10:18
    Originally posted by woodypusher
    ".... — just like planet formation theory predicts that we cannot form planets so far from the host star."]
    Surely the collision of two planets closer to the star could easily lead to a planet orbiting further away?
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    07 Dec '13 14:012 edits
    When do we send the newly discovered planet a team of earth representatives?

    The sooner we can begin taxing them the better cause we are all out of money. :'(

    If need be, I'll go. I've even prepared a speech.

    "Hello my fellow universal citizens. I come in peace despite what you hear about us, we are peaceful and wish to extend this peace to you yada, yada, yada. Now, as peaceful universal citizens I offer you real universal health care, real universal retirement, a fair wage, and the option to kill off your offspring before they are born. Not to worry though, what you have now you can keep whether it be your current doctor of your current plot of land etc. All you have to do is pay "your fair share" and all this, and much, much more, can be yours!!! Just sign on the dotted line." 😵
  10. Subscribersonhouse
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    07 Dec '13 21:31
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    Surely the collision of two planets closer to the star could easily lead to a planet orbiting further away?
    It may be just a wanderer shot out of a previous solar system and floating through the galaxy till it was captured by this star.
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    07 Dec '13 23:32
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    Surely the collision of two planets closer to the star could easily lead to a planet orbiting further away?
    It's certainly possible to have a gravitational slingshot effect where one gets thrown
    outwards, and the other inwards...

    But this system is VERY young. And this planet is really massive.

    Would take something really impressive to slingshot it out that far.

    That's an enormous potential well to climb out of.
  12. Joined
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    07 Dec '13 23:33
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    It may be just a wanderer shot out of a previous solar system and floating through the galaxy till it was captured by this star.
    In just 13 million years??
  13. Standard membermenace71
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    08 Dec '13 05:19
    At what point could an object / Planet become a star ? I've heard Jupiter was basically just an un-born star and just did not have the mass to start up Fusion to ignite. I guess I'm asking how much smaller that our sun can an object be and yet have the Fusion process going on

    Manny
  14. Subscribersonhouse
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    08 Dec '13 05:38
    Originally posted by googlefudge
    It's certainly possible to have a gravitational slingshot effect where one gets thrown
    outwards, and the other inwards...

    But this system is VERY young. And this planet is really massive.

    Would take something really impressive to slingshot it out that far.

    That's an enormous potential well to climb out of.
    One thing I think I misunderstood. The piece says it is 11 times larger than Jupiter, I thought that meant physically larger but it sounds like it is supposed to be 11 times the mass.

    I would assume that would bring the size down to something like 3 times the radius.

    Does that sound about right?
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    08 Dec '13 13:20
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    One thing I think I misunderstood. The piece says it is 11 times larger than Jupiter, I thought that meant physically larger but it sounds like it is supposed to be 11 times the mass.

    I would assume that would bring the size down to something like 3 times the radius.

    Does that sound about right?
    Assuming similar density then you would expect it to have 11 times the volume or appx 2.22 times the radius.

    You can get all the details from the pre-publication article here

    http://arxiv.org/pdf/1312.1265v1.pdf
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