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Science Forum

Science Forum

  1. 05 Sep '17 22:31 / 1 edit
    How fast can hurricanes get? Irma's at 185 mph which puts it in rarefied air for hurricanes. Faster winds speeds have been measured, though, in tornadoes and at the top of Mount Washington. It seems like scientists have a good hold on established upper limits of hurricanes based on the surface temperature of the ocean waters, but what about when that changes? Surely there are other limitations as well, including the rate and/or efficiency of converting heat energy into wind speeds. Could a hurricane theoretically approach or exceed the speed of sound? What's the max?
  2. 11 Sep '17 02:47
    It was only a cat 2 when it hit Naples.
  3. 11 Sep '17 10:31 / 1 edit
    Charley was worse, let alone Andrew.
  4. 11 Sep '17 10:37 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by @eladar
    Charley was worse, let alone Andrew.
    Is this what they mean by global warming super storms, typical hurricanes?
  5. 11 Sep '17 14:20
    Originally posted by @eladar
    Is this what they mean by global warming super storms, typical hurricanes?
    Who is they? What is a global warming super storm?
  6. 11 Sep '17 14:34
    We're all gonna die!
  7. 11 Sep '17 23:44
    Originally posted by @whodey
    We're all gonna die!
    Too late.
  8. 11 Sep '17 23:45
    Originally posted by @wildgrass
    Who is they? What is a global warming super storm?
    Exactly
  9. 12 Sep '17 02:51
    Originally posted by @eladar
    Exactly
    Exactly what? You brought it up.
  10. 13 Sep '17 00:53 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by @wildgrass
    Exactly what? You brought it up.
    You were pondering as if Irma was some great powerful srorm.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_the_most_intense_tropical_cyclones


    Irmas 185 isn't even close to the record.
  11. 13 Sep '17 05:17 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by @eladar
    You were pondering as if Irma was some great powerful srorm.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_the_most_intense_tropical_cyclones


    Irmas 185 isn't even close to the record.
    If you sort it by wind speed you can easily see that there is only one storm stronger than Irma (185 mph) and this is Allen (190 mph).

    How do you mean, "not even close"? Haven't you read the list yourself...?
  12. 13 Sep '17 11:19
    Originally posted by @fabianfnas
    If you sort it by wind speed you can easily see that there is only one storm stronger than Irma (185 mph) and this is Allen (190 mph).

    How do you mean, "not even close"? Haven't you read the list yourself...?
    I think you can find one with over 200. In any case our record of wind speed is not very long.

    Irma was a dud.
  13. 13 Sep '17 12:02 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by @eladar
    I think you can find one with over 200. In any case our record of wind speed is not very long.

    Irma was a dud.
    Apology accepted.
  14. 13 Sep '17 16:13
    Originally posted by @eladar
    You were pondering as if Irma was some great powerful srorm.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_the_most_intense_tropical_cyclones


    Irmas 185 isn't even close to the record.
    I was wondering what the theoretical max speed would be, given the established critical variables. I still don't know who "they" are, and what exactly you mean when you say "global warming super storm." What is that?
  15. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    13 Sep '17 23:06
    Originally posted by @wildgrass
    I was wondering what the theoretical max speed would be, given the established critical variables. I still don't know who "they" are, and what exactly you mean when you say "global warming super storm." What is that?
    Here is a site listing all kinds of hurricane records, max 1 minute wind, Allen, 1980, 190 MPH but there are a bunch of other records too, lowest barometer readings and such.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Atlantic_hurricane_records