1. Subscribersonhouse
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    05 Dec '11 21:36
    http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-12-quantum-world-diamonds.html

    Something strange and wonderful going on here!
  2. Germany
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    05 Dec '11 22:23
    Quantum physics at room temperature is hardly new, quantum entanglement (in a way that is measured) AFAIK is.
  3. Subscribersonhouse
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    06 Dec '11 02:32
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    Quantum physics at room temperature is hardly new, quantum entanglement (in a way that is measured) AFAIK is.
    Could they do entanglement like that if the two crystals were say separated by a lead container around one of them?
  4. Germany
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    06 Dec '11 14:30
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Could they do entanglement like that if the two crystals were say separated by a lead container around one of them?
    I don't think so, the lead container would absorb the phonons.
  5. Subscribersonhouse
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    07 Dec '11 03:03
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    I don't think so, the lead container would absorb the phonons.
    You think it's phonons that connect them? What about photons entangled? Would it matter then?
  6. Germany
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    07 Dec '11 14:24
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    You think it's phonons that connect them? What about photons entangled? Would it matter then?
    Of course, photons also strongly interact with lead.
  7. Subscribersonhouse
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    10 Dec '11 12:12
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    Of course, photons also strongly interact with lead.
    I was imagining a huge sphere of lead, one photon let loose entangled with another outside the lead sphere, and you measured the one say, inside the lead sphere, would the other one do its unentangled thing too? I don't think the phonon thing would be involved if it were in a vacuum for both photons.
  8. Germany
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    12 Dec '11 14:17
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    I was imagining a huge sphere of lead, one photon let loose entangled with another outside the lead sphere, and you measured the one say, inside the lead sphere, would the other one do its unentangled thing too? I don't think the phonon thing would be involved if it were in a vacuum for both photons.
    How would you get an entangled photon through a sphere of lead?
  9. Subscribersonhouse
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    13 Dec '11 01:11
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    How would you get an entangled photon through a sphere of lead?
    A very fast trap door.
  10. Joined
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    15 Dec '11 15:00
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    A very fast trap door.
    Or the assistance of one of Maxwell's demons.

    Richard
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    15 Dec '11 16:07
    I know that some quantum phenomena demand cool (in some sense) environment, but isn't it so that many things in our homes wouldn't work at all if not quantum physics has a finger in play?

    What about a CD-player? Would that device work if only Newtonian physics were available?
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    17 Dec '11 12:49
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    I know that some quantum phenomena demand cool (in some sense) environment, but isn't it so that many things in our homes wouldn't work at all if not quantum physics has a finger in play?

    What about a CD-player? Would that device work if only Newtonian physics were available?
    Your very computer would not work without room temperature (or higher - there's a cooling fin on that chip for a reason) quantum physics: the transistors in integrated circuits depend on it. So without high-temp quantum physics, no RHP...

    Nevertheless, the story that started this thread is, IIUIC, something else. It involves a quantum effect which had, up to now, not been observed under "normal" circumstances. (How "normal" a diamond is is another matter.)

    Richard
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    17 Dec '11 13:35
    Originally posted by Shallow Blue
    Your very computer would not work without room temperature (or higher - there's a cooling fin on that chip for a reason) quantum physics: the transistors in integrated circuits depend on it. So without high-temp quantum physics, no RHP...

    Nevertheless, the story that started this thread is, IIUIC, something else. It involves a quantum effect which ha ...[text shortened]... ved under "normal" circumstances. (How "normal" a diamond is is another matter.)

    Richard
    Title of this thread: "Quantum physics shown at room temp!"

    My comment: There are quantum physics in any temperature.
  14. In your face
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    17 Dec '11 21:21
    Sorry, I'm a bit of a nube to this entanglement business. So has entanglement actually been observed between electrons with a large geographical separation or is it just a theory?
  15. Subscribersonhouse
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    17 Dec '11 21:40
    Originally posted by jimslyp69
    Sorry, I'm a bit of a nube to this entanglement business. So has entanglement actually been observed between electrons with a large geographical separation or is it just a theory?
    I know it's been shown in photons where they were separated by enough space to prove when entanglement ended the effect had to 'transmit' a LOT faster than the speed of light.
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