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  1. 09 Jul '15 07:12 / 3 edits
    http://phys.org/news/2015-07-record-breaking-heavy-rainfall-events-global.html

    No surprises there although, for some reason, the effect has been observed to be worst in South East Asia with a 56% increase in record breaking heavy rain events observed there in recent years compared to 12% increase globally.
    I presume that has that has something to do with the monsoon? -The link doesn't mention the monsoon.

    One thing it says about those record-breaking heavy rain events is:

    "...The average increase is 12 percent globally - but 56 percent in South East Asia

    An advanced statistical analysis of rainfall data from the years 1901 to 2010 derived from thousands of weather stations around the globe shows that over 1980-2010 there were 12 percent more of these events than expected in a stationary climate, a scenario without global warming. "Due to the upward trend, the worldwide increase of record-breaking daily rainfall events in the very last year of the studied period reaches even 26 percent", Lehmann adds.
    ..."

    It is clear from these observations that at least the current general trend is up.
  2. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    09 Jul '15 11:17
    Originally posted by humy
    http://phys.org/news/2015-07-record-breaking-heavy-rainfall-events-global.html

    No surprises there although, for some reason, the effect has been observed to be worst in South East Asia with a 56% increase in record breaking heavy rain events observed there in recent years compared to 12% increase globally.
    I presume that has that has something to do with t ...[text shortened]... dds.
    ..."

    It is clear from these observations that at least the current general trend is up.
    It certainly seems to be holding up here in Pennsylvania and New Jersey! Rains so heavy on homeward commute, I cannot see the cars ahead. Very dangerous.
  3. 09 Jul '15 13:12 / 11 edits
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    It certainly seems to be holding up here in Pennsylvania and New Jersey! Rains so heavy on homeward commute, I cannot see the cars ahead. Very dangerous.
    just last year I had a storm of giant hailstones at my location (within north-west England ) that defoliated and completely shredded all my vegetables in my garden and also a row of vary large trees along my fence. By the time it ended, my garden looked just as if a bomb had hit it, and then we where later hit by yet more terrible weather! I got almost no crop at all from my garden that year; just some very poor quality rhubarb and just a few blight-infested tomatoes -and even that was a small miracle!
    This year has been a bit better but not much better due to the almost constant storms that hit here in the spring. I have never got such poor crops than in the last two years due to bad whether. The weather here has been just terrible in recent years.
  4. 09 Jul '15 13:39
    Originally posted by humy
    http://phys.org/news/2015-07-record-breaking-heavy-rainfall-events-global.html

    No surprises there although, for some reason, the effect has been observed to be worst in South East Asia with a 56% increase in record breaking heavy rain events observed there in recent years compared to 12% increase globally.
    I presume that has that has something to do with t ...[text shortened]... dds.
    ..."

    It is clear from these observations that at least the current general trend is up.
    That is consistent with what I have been saying all along, more rainfall and less droughts. This is a good thing overall. More rain = more food production.
    Blaming it only on man made causes is ridiculous though. This trend started 300 years ago. It is mostly natural warming. Whoever wrote the article is obviously biased.
  5. 09 Jul '15 13:41
    Originally posted by humy
    just last year I had a storm of giant hailstones at my location (within north-west England ) that defoliated and completely shredded all my vegetables in my garden and also a row of vary large trees along my fence. By the time it ended, my garden looked just as if a bomb had hit it, and then we where later hit by yet more terrible weather! I got almost no crop ...[text shortened]... the last two years due to bad whether. The weather here has been just terrible in recent years.
    My garden looks good. Everything is fine here in Michigan. I'm pleased with the weather in this area.
  6. 09 Jul '15 16:09 / 8 edits
    Originally posted by Metal Brain
    That is consistent with what I have been saying all along, more rainfall and less droughts.
    Nope. Greater variation in rainfall, like predicted by global warming, doesn't mean less droughts.
    Greater variation in rainfall means more incidences of flooding and more incidences of drought. Where is the contradiction in there being more incidences of long periods (say, for over two months ) of no rain between more incidences of severe rain that causes flooding?
    More rain = more food production.

    what? Even if it causes flooding of a kind that devastates crops? (are you now going to ask me what is my source of information that flooding from too much rain can devastate crops? Do you really need a link for that? Do you need a link to tell you that torrents of flood water can damage crops? ) Like most of your assertions, that is a totally stupid assertion.
    Each kind of crop under each kind of set of conditions needs only so much finite amount of watering for optimum growth and any more watering generally reduces yield and therefore food production. For example, with my farming experience, I have often known potato crops, which are a kind of crop generally known to have relatively low tolerance of saturated soil, to have very poor harvest or, in extreme cases, no harvest, when there is unseasonably too much rain for them (even if there is no actual flooding ).
    Even rice paddies can be devastated by massive amounts of rain; torrents of flood water washing them away. Alternatively, they can be killed off if the water becomes too deep for them and it cannot be drained off fast enough. So even for rice, more rain doesn't simplistically mean more food. It just depends.
  7. 09 Jul '15 18:04
    Originally posted by humy
    Nope. Greater variation in rainfall, like predicted by global warming, doesn't mean less droughts.
    Greater variation in rainfall means more incidences of flooding and more incidences of drought. Where is the contradiction in there being more incidences of long periods (say, for over two months ) of no rain between more incidences of severe rain that causes fl ...[text shortened]... fast enough. So even for rice, more rain doesn't simplistically mean more food. It just depends.
    "Nope. Greater variation in rainfall, like predicted by global warming, doesn't mean less droughts."

    What is your source of information? Your link contradicts your claim. Please tell me you can present a reputable link that can verify your claim to the satisfaction of all of us here.
  8. 09 Jul '15 18:07
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    It certainly seems to be holding up here in Pennsylvania and New Jersey! Rains so heavy on homeward commute, I cannot see the cars ahead. Very dangerous.
    Do you know the difference between climate change and the weather? You are talking about the weather!
  9. 09 Jul '15 18:08
    Originally posted by humy
    The weather here has been just terrible in recent years.
    That may be entirely true, but anecdotal evidence is of no real value when it come to global climate.
    In my own experience, every time we had weather I thought extreme, there was some old farmer who had memories of something worse from before I was born - and in one case he had photos to prove it.
  10. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    09 Jul '15 18:16
    nO Originally posted by Metal Brain
    Do you know the difference between climate change and the weather? You are talking about the weather!
    No shyte Sherlock. The bit with climate change wasn't mentioned, it was more rainfall.

    The thing with more rainfall is you don't get something for nothing. It is not a world wide increase in the availability of water. It is a concentration of water in some places at the expense of drought in others.
  11. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    09 Jul '15 20:06 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    No shyte Sherlock. The bit with climate change wasn't mentioned, it was more rainfall.

    The thing with more rainfall is you don't get something for nothing. It is not a world wide increase in the availability of water. It is a concentration of water in some places at the expense of drought in others.
    Well it did mention global change but there isn't that much extra water, just concentrated in certain areas.
  12. 09 Jul '15 20:40 / 4 edits
    Originally posted by Metal Brain
    "Nope. Greater variation in rainfall, like predicted by global warming, doesn't mean less droughts."

    What is your source of information? .
    "source of information" of what? That greater variation in rainfall doesn't mean less droughts?

    If so, the "source" of information is just plain old basic logic that even a halfwit can understand. How does greater variation in rainfall logically imply less droughts? What it the logical contradiction in there being greater variation in rainfall and more droughts? Answer; none. In vary basic deductive logic, if x doesn't contradict y, then x doesn't logically imply not y. Or, if you prefer, if x doesn't contradict not y, then x doesn't logically imply y. This is just how deductive logic works.
    The statement:
    "greater variation in rainfall doesn't mean less droughts"
    is necessarily true by such deductive logic. No web link is required to show this; just your own brain if only you would use it.

    if not, then source of information for what exactly?
    Your link contradicts your claim.

    which “claim”? Nothing in the link contradicts anything I said and I challenge you to tell us exactly which claim I made that is contradicted by the link and quote exactly where in the link it does so and exactly how so.
  13. 09 Jul '15 21:00 / 3 edits
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    anecdotal evidence is of no real value when it come to global climate.
    I
    I wasn't making an inference about global climate from anecdotal evidence. I was just saying how bad the weather has been in my part of the world recently, that is all. Obviously, I know that that one local data sample is not representative of global climate/weather.
  14. 09 Jul '15 21:05 / 6 edits
    Originally posted by Metal Brain
    Do you know the difference between climate change and the weather? You are talking about the weather!
    climate change changes the average weather and/or average weather variations. Nobody here thinks/says climate change is weather and we all know the difference just fine.
  15. 10 Jul '15 01:37
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    No shyte Sherlock. The bit with climate change wasn't mentioned, it was more rainfall.

    The thing with more rainfall is you don't get something for nothing. It is not a world wide increase in the availability of water. It is a concentration of water in some places at the expense of drought in others.
    Read the article from the link humy posted. It says a worldwide increase of 12% and says nothing about droughts in other places. It is like you make this stuff up.