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Science Forum

  1. 27 Jan '17 02:29
    The moon is in a perfect orbit of the earth with regards to its position.

    The moon is not only the perfect size, but the perfect distance from the sun, to produce a perfect eclipse.

    The odds of this being an accident of the universe are likely to be beyond calculation.

    The size and postion of the moon and sun, relative to earth equals......Design.
  2. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    27 Jan '17 06:12
    Originally posted by chaney3
    The moon is in a perfect orbit of the earth with regards to its position.

    The moon is not only the perfect size, but the perfect distance from the sun, to produce a perfect eclipse.

    The odds of this being an accident of the universe are likely to be beyond calculation.

    The size and postion of the moon and sun, relative to earth equals......Design.
    Not even close. What is going on is the moon is and has been receding from Earth at a rate of about a cm per year for the past 3 odd billion years. It was WAY closer back then and will be way further away in another billion years and therefore ZERO perfect eclipse.

    You are turning a coincidence into a religious experience.
  3. 27 Jan '17 06:31
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Not even close. What is going on is the moon is and has been receding from Earth at a rate of about a cm per year for the past 3 odd billion years. It was WAY closer back then and will be way further away in another billion years and therefore ZERO perfect eclipse.

    You are turning a coincidence into a religious experience.
    Why did you choose to ignore the fact that the sun is much larger than the moon, yet it is precisely far away enough to cause the perfection of an eclipse. These odds are no coincidence or accident.

    And your cm per year for billions of years explanation is questionable.
  4. 27 Jan '17 07:07
    Originally posted by chaney3
    The odds of this being an accident of the universe are likely to be beyond calculation.
    The odds that you are capable of calculating it or even know anything about the situation are likely to be beyond calculation.
  5. 27 Jan '17 07:08
    Originally posted by chaney3
    The moon is not only the perfect size, but the perfect distance from the sun, to produce a perfect eclipse.
    What is a 'perfect eclipse'?
    You probably don't know this because you got your information off a creationist website, but eclipses are not 'perfect' and they vary quite considerably from eclipse to eclipse.
  6. 27 Jan '17 07:09
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    The odds that you are capable of calculating it or even know anything about the situation are likely to be beyond calculation.
    The facts speak for themselves.
    Your reply contained nothing to dispute this. Noted.
  7. 27 Jan '17 07:29
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    What is a 'perfect eclipse'?
    You probably don't know this because you got your information off a creationist website, but eclipses are not 'perfect' and they vary quite considerably from eclipse to eclipse.
    C"mon.
    If the moon or sun varied at all in size, an eclipse would not happen.

    If the moon or sun varied at all in distance between them, an eclipse would not happen.

    It's as if the moon was positioned exactly......exactly where it is, and its size.
  8. 27 Jan '17 07:59
    Originally posted by chaney3
    The moon is in a perfect orbit of the earth with regards to its position.

    The moon is not only the perfect size, but the perfect distance from the sun, to produce a perfect eclipse.

    The odds of this being an accident of the universe are likely to be beyond calculation.

    The size and postion of the moon and sun, relative to earth equals......Design.
    The Moon is not in a circular orbit around Earth and does vary in apparent size.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supermoon

    The "odds of X being an accident of the Universe" is not a well-defined property of X.
  9. 27 Jan '17 08:18
    There are 4 major points, and nobody is addressing all 4 in their responses:

    The orbit of the moon.
    The size of the moon.
    The size of the sun.
    The distance between the moon and the sun.

    If any of these were off, even slightly, an eclipse would not be possible.
  10. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    27 Jan '17 11:16
    Originally posted by chaney3
    There are 4 major points, and nobody is addressing all 4 in their responses:

    The orbit of the moon.
    The size of the moon.
    The size of the sun.
    The distance between the moon and the sun.

    If any of these were off, even slightly, an eclipse would not be possible.
    And you refuse to even acknowledge the moon is receding from Earth at a known rate. I suppose you also are one of those moon landing deniers too. They left a retro-reflector on the moon that routes an incoming laser beam from Earth directly back at Earth so they launch a powerful laser beam for a split second, some of that beam hits the reflector, and a few photons makes their way back to the laser where a detector counts exacly how many seconds have passed between laser start pulse and the return. A known technique, which with radio waves is called Radar. With lasers it is called Lidar.

    http://www.lasertech.com/blogs/Traffic-Safety/post/2013/05/15/Difference-Between-Radar-and-Lidar-Explained.aspx

    It works EXACTLY the same as a police laser speed detector except it does not use doppler shift to tell the speed, it uses the time of flight of the photons to measure the distance to the moon with an accuracy of 1 centimeter. So after a year, they can see the moon receding on a stately pace of about 1 cm per year. So if you do the math, you can see, say 1 billion years ago, it was 1 billion cm closer, or 100 million meters or 100,000 kilometers and further, a billion years from now, it will be 100,000 km further away rendering it impossible to make a 'perfect' as you call it, eclipse because the moon will be too far away from Earth to completely cover the sun.

    It is a total accident of planetary construction that caused that. When the moon formed it was maybe 20,000 km from Earth maximum. Now over ten times that distance. And the distance gets greater every year and that is a fact jack.
  11. 27 Jan '17 15:52
    Originally posted by chaney3
    There are 4 major points, and nobody is addressing all 4 in their responses:

    The orbit of the moon.
    The size of the moon.
    The size of the sun.
    The distance between the moon and the sun.

    If any of these were off, even slightly, an eclipse would not be possible.
    As I pointed out, the Moon is not in a circular orbit around Earth and does vary in apparent size. So the distance of the Moon to the Earth does vary.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supermoon
  12. 27 Jan '17 16:07
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    As I pointed out, the Moon is not in a circular orbit around Earth and does vary in apparent size. So the distance of the Moon to the Earth does vary.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supermoon
    This only makes design more likely. The orbit the moon IS in makes the eclipse possible, along with the 'proper' moon size when it comes into the path of the sun.

    Let's not forget the precise size of the sun and its precise distance away from the moon, which sonhouse calls an 'accident.

    It is no accident, it's design.
  13. 27 Jan '17 16:39
    Originally posted by chaney3
    It is no accident, it's design.
    Why would someone design that?
  14. 27 Jan '17 16:49
    Originally posted by wildgrass
    Why would someone design that?
    Likely to prove that the big bang was not just a haphazard event, but an orchestrated event.

    An event that put the earth, moon and sun in precise positions, with the exact sizes to produce an eclipse.
  15. 27 Jan '17 17:12 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by chaney3
    Likely to prove that the big bang was not just a haphazard event, but an orchestrated event.

    An event that put the earth, moon and sun in precise positions, with the exact sizes to produce an eclipse.
    As has already been mentioned, the sizes and positions of these three objects are not precise. Depending on the distance of the moon to the earth, and the distance of the earth to the sun, at the time of the eclipse, the area of the earth where the total eclipse can be observed also changes. Every eclipse is different in this aspect.

    Eventually the moon will drift far enough away from earth where solar eclipses no longer occur. So the orchestrator made a mistake?