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  1. Subscriber ogb
    24 Jun '17 17:09 / 1 edit
    The reason for human life is to advance our knowledge of science. Especially on the quantum level.
    All other endeavors are worthless., except for chess.
  2. 24 Jun '17 17:36
    The meaning of life is to forever strive to find the meaning of life and just hope we never have the contradiction of finding it.
    ( ask a silly question... )
  3. 25 Jun '17 07:25
    Originally posted by ogb
    The reason for human life is to advance our knowledge of science. Especially on the quantum level.
    All other endeavors are worthless., except for chess.
    Reason is, by definition, a relative attribute not an inherent attribute thus to declare the meaning of something is just a matter of your own opinion.
  4. Subscriber FreakyKBH
    Acquired Taste...
    25 Jun '17 08:35
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    Reason is, by definition, a relative attribute not an inherent attribute thus to declare the meaning of something is just a matter of your own opinion.
    reason
    noun
    1.a basis or cause, as for some belief, action, fact, event, etc.

    One may not know or understand another person's reason for their action, but what is unequivocal is that reason is necessary for action.
  5. 25 Jun '17 09:47 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by FreakyKBH
    reason
    noun
    [b]1.a basis or cause, as for some belief, action, fact, event, etc.


    One may not know or understand another person's reason for their action, but what is unequivocal is that reason is necessary for action.[/b]
    right, but different people have different reasons for different opposing actions and, excluding those reasons that make no sense or are flawed, there is no none arbitrary criteria to define which reason and thus which action is the 'correct' one.
  6. Subscriber FreakyKBH
    Acquired Taste...
    25 Jun '17 10:11
    Originally posted by humy
    right, but different people have different reasons for different opposing actions and, excluding those reasons that make no sense or are flawed, there is no none arbitrary criteria to define which reason and thus which action is the 'correct' one.
    Except for self-interest, which appears to be the guiding force in most of existence.
  7. 25 Jun '17 10:37 / 4 edits
    Originally posted by FreakyKBH
    Except for self-interest, which appears to be the guiding force in most of existence.
    many people often don't reason or act purely in self-interest but have other more selfless motives which are no less logical for there is no none arbitrary criteria for defining which motives are the 'correct' ones.

    The point I am trying to make from these posts is that the 'reason' one may attribute to human life is purely subjective i.e. just purely a matter of personal opinion and thus will often be completely different for different people with one person not being any more 'correct' about that than the other.

    Excluding the science of psychology, science have very little if anything to say on this matter.
  8. Subscriber FreakyKBH
    Acquired Taste...
    25 Jun '17 12:07
    Originally posted by humy
    many people often don't reason or act purely in self-interest but have other more selfless motives which are no less logical for there is no none arbitrary criteria for defining which motives are the 'correct' ones.

    The point I am trying to make from these posts is that the 'reason' one may attribute to human life is purely subjective i.e. just purely a matt ...[text shortened]... Excluding the science of psychology, science have very little if anything to say on this matter.
    I've only been on the planet for 53 years, so I'm not going to discount any possibility, but...
    despite my limited exposure, one thing is certain: not once in my time on the planet have I ever met anyone who did not act according to their own self-interest.
    Ever.

    That being said, while people are able to attribute any manner of purposes for their own life, THE reason for life is the monopoly of the person who created life in the first place.
    It is His prerogative to either share that reason with those so empowered.
    Too, it appears as though He is (at least temporarily) condoning the attribution of purpose by the myriad people upon whom life has been bestowed: no cookie-cutter application is currently mandated.

    This tacit comity may and does lead to any manner of off-track ideas (in relation to the life-giver's intention), replete with all manner of varied models and prescriptions for life.
    None of these programs, no matter how thoughtfully and painstakingly developed, however, supersede or negate the original purpose and intention as seen by the life-giver.

    So while the gifted have sundry ideas and proposals for the proper application of their gifts, there is no question that the gift-giver had/has a reason behind the endowment.
  9. 25 Jun '17 14:28
    Originally posted by FreakyKBH
    I've only been on the planet for 53 years, so I'm not going to discount any possibility, but...
    despite my limited exposure, one thing is certain: not once in my time on the planet have I ever met anyone who did not act according to their own self-interest.
    Ever.
    Of course you have - people routinely act either altruistically or foolishly (not knowing their self-interest). An easy example of the latter is the 63 million people who voted for Donald Trump; you are probably aware of some Trump voters.
  10. 25 Jun '17 15:16 / 6 edits
    Originally posted by FreakyKBH
    I've only been on the planet for 53 years, ...
    despite my limited exposure, one thing is certain: not once in my time on the planet have I ever met anyone who did not act according to their own self-interest.
    Ever.
    surely you don't deny many people HAVE acted altruistically against their own self-interest?
    You must have heard of them!? Incidences of people sacrificing their own lives to save other peoples lives etc. Right? Incidences of people in war time throwing themselves on a hand grenade to stop the blast killing some other people around them, right? What do you call that?
    What about people that give money to charity? Or work for charity? I once worked for a charity (I will explain details of that on request) for just one whole year (with no pay, of course); how on earth do you think I thought that was in my self-interest?
    May people spend much money doing astronomy; not for any financial gain but just out of curiosity of astronomy; how is that purely in self-interest?
    Many people take care of sick or disabled family members; do you really think there is always only selfish motive for that?
  11. Subscriber FreakyKBH
    Acquired Taste...
    25 Jun '17 15:34
    Originally posted by humy
    surely you don't deny many people HAVE acted altruistically against their own self-interest?
    You must have heard of them!? Incidences of people sacrificing their own lives to save other peoples lives etc. Right? Incidences of people in war time throwing themselves on a hand grenade to stop the blast killing some other people around them, right? What do you cal ...[text shortened]... ck or disabled family members; do you really think there is always only selfish motive for that?
    I could answer all of them, but in the interest of not repeating myself, I'll answer just one, the one you can verify.
    For my answer, I'll ask you one question:
    Why did you work voluntarily for one year?
  12. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    25 Jun '17 16:52
    Originally posted by ogb
    The reason for human life is to advance our knowledge of science. Especially on the quantum level.
    All other endeavors are worthless., except for chess.
    So the reason for life is different now then say 1000 years ago, since there was not much in the way of science back then, right?
  13. 25 Jun '17 17:01 / 3 edits
    Originally posted by FreakyKBH

    [b]Why did you work voluntarily for one year?
    [/b]
    compassion + wanted to feel like I was doing something helpful (to others) and wanted to feel like it was kind of 'meaningful' to me.
    In other words, purely for deeply psychological personal reasons; what other credible reason could there be?
    What do you think is the typical motive for charity work?
  14. Subscriber FreakyKBH
    Acquired Taste...
    25 Jun '17 18:54
    Originally posted by humy
    compassion + wanted to feel like I was doing something helpful (to others) and wanted to feel like it was kind of 'meaningful' to me.
    In other words, purely for deeply psychological personal reasons; what other credible reason could there be?
    What do you think is the typical motive for charity work?
    "Wanted to feel" something to such a degree, you were willing to exchange one thing (free labor) for another (feeling of good will).
    Not altruistic in the least, really.
  15. 25 Jun '17 19:35 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by FreakyKBH
    "Wanted to feel" something to such a degree, you were willing to exchange one thing (free labor) for another (feeling of good will).
    .
    you left out the compassion part of that; Why? There is nothing selfish about compassion.

    http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/altruistic
    "...showing a wish to help or bring advantages to others, even if it results in disadvantage for yourself: ..."

    Bearing in mind it is NOT done just purely to 'feel good'; (why do you ignore the existence of compassion? ) How does that not fit the English dictionary meaning of altruistic? Why cannot there be good feeling with being altruistic? There is no contradiction there.