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  1. 27 Jun '08 17:56
    more grains of sand or more stars?

    do we know yet?
  2. 27 Jun '08 18:08
    Originally posted by eatmybishop
    more grains of sand or more stars?

    do we know yet?
    Both are calculable. So the truth is out there...
  3. Standard member shavixmir
    Guppy poo
    27 Jun '08 18:26
    Originally posted by eatmybishop
    more grains of sand or more stars?

    do we know yet?
    Well, if there were that many stars, wouldn't we have better films?

    Oh. Them stars.

    Well, if we had that many of them stars, wouldn't the whole sky just be one big ball of light at night?
  4. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    27 Jun '08 21:32
    Originally posted by shavixmir
    Well, if there were that many stars, wouldn't we have better films?

    Oh. Them stars.

    Well, if we had that many of them stars, wouldn't the whole sky just be one big ball of light at night?
    That is an ancient conundrum debated by scientists for centuries but proven false by astronomers, I'll see if I can sniff up a link.
    The gist is, that would be true if space was infinite and filled with an infinite # of stars but it's no and no to that so the sky is dark mainly. Of course if you look in the direction of the Milky Way, it would seem a little like that but even there, if you have good telescopes like Hubble, you see dark between the stars.
    The grains of sand thing, is this: There are more stars than grains of sand.
    Way more in fact.
    I counted both just last week, took forever!
  5. 28 Jun '08 08:42
    The grains of sand thing, is this: There are more stars than grains of sand.
    Way more in fact.
    I counted both just last week, took forever![/b]
    wow! i appreciate your dedication to finding an answer
  6. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    155 years
    29 Jun '08 16:09
    From

    http://answers.google.com/answers/threadview?id=539329

    Hello and thank you for your question.

    "So how many grains of sand are there in the world? You could start
    off by trying to guess how many grains of sand there are in a spoon of
    sand. Use a magnifying glass to count how many grains fit in a small
    section. Then, count how many of those sections fit in your spoon.
    Multiply the two numbers together to get an estimate.
    "Using this same principle, plus some additional information,
    mathematicians at the University of Hawaii tried to guess how many
    grains of sand are on the world's beaches. They came up with
    7,500,000,000,000,000,000, or seven quintillion five quadrillion
    grains of sand."
    How many grains of sand are in the world?
    http://www.miamisci.org/tripod/whysand.html

    The calculation is detailed here:
    http://www.hawaii.edu/suremath/jsand.html

    That number is 7.5 x 10^18 or 7.5 billion billion.

    How many stars, galaxies, clusters, QSO's etc. in the Universe?
    http://www.faqs.org/faqs/astronomy/faq/part8/section-3.html
    "To get the total stellar population in the Milky Way [that is, in our
    galaxy alone], we must take the number of luminous stars that we can
    see at large distances and assume that we know how many fainter stars
    go along with them. Recent numbers give about 400,000,000,000 (400
    billion) stars, but a 50% error either way is quite plausible."

    So in our galaxy alone, there might be between 2 x 10^11 and 6 x 10^11 stars

    How many galaxies in the Universe?
    http://www.faqs.org/faqs/astronomy/faq/part8/section-4.html
    "the Hubble telescope is capable of detecting about 80 billion
    galaxies (although not all of these within the foreseeable future!).
    In fact, there must be many more than this, even within the observable
    Universe, since the most
    common kind of galaxy in our own neighborhood is the faint dwarfs
    which are difficult enough to see nearby, much less at large
    cosmological distances. For example, in our own local group, there are
    3 or 4 giant galaxies which would be detectable at a billion
    light-years or more (Andromeda, the Milky Way, the Pinwheel in
    Triangulum, and maybe the Large Magellanic Cloud). However, there are
    at least another 20 faint members, which would be difficult to find at
    100 million light-years, much less the billions of light years to
    which the brightest galaxies can be seen."

    So the lower end estimate for the number of galaxies is 8 x 10^10

    If we accept even the lower end of these Hubble figures, and if our
    Milky Way has a typical number of stars in it, that puts the number of
    stars in the universe to be at least
    (2 x 10^11) x (8 x 10^10) = 16 x 10^ 21

    So if we round the number of sand grains to, say, 10^20
    and round the number of stars to, say 10^22
    then there are at least 100 stars in the universe for every grain of sand on earth.

    As you say, that's a *LOT*

    Search terms used
    beach sand particles cubic
    "number of stars in the universe

    Thanks again for your interesting question
    Richard-ga
  7. 29 Jun '08 20:54
    Originally posted by eatmybishop
    more grains of sand or more stars?

    do we know yet?
    There are more stars than sand.
  8. 30 Jun '08 09:17
    Originally posted by UzumakiAi
    There are more stars than sand.
    Well, if you're only counting grains of sand on Earth, that is. Nobody knows how many grains of sand there are on other planets circling other stars.

    Richard