1. Standard memberrhb
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    26 Feb '08 10:22
    http://www.timeforchess.com/img/forums/forum-science.gif

    Is it Lithium? My Chemistry is a bit rusty.
  2. Joined
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    27 Feb '08 02:23
    Originally posted by rhb
    http://www.timeforchess.com/img/forums/forum-science.gif

    Is it Lithium? My Chemistry is a bit rusty.
    I find you, your handle, and the photograph associated with it, to be highly offensive and inappropriate, and will be complaining to the administrators immediately.
  3. Joined
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    27 Feb '08 02:291 edit
    Originally posted by Mark Adkins
    I find you, your handle, and the photograph associated with it, to be highly offensive and inappropriate, and will be complaining to the administrators immediately.
    ??? why, if I may ask?
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    27 Feb '08 03:33
    Originally posted by serigado
    ??? why, if I may ask?
    Good question!
  5. SubscriberAThousandYoung
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    27 Feb '08 05:13
    Originally posted by rhb
    http://www.timeforchess.com/img/forums/forum-science.gif

    Is it Lithium? My Chemistry is a bit rusty.
    Looks like it with the three electrons. In fact it seems to be in some sort of excited state, since all three are in separate orbitals. Normally lithium has two in the 1s orbital and the third in the 1p orbital, but this thing has them separate.
  6. Standard memberagryson
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    27 Feb '08 17:54
    Originally posted by rhb
    http://www.timeforchess.com/img/forums/forum-science.gif

    Is it Lithium? My Chemistry is a bit rusty.
    Given ATY's comment above, this is obviously a Bohr model for either lithium or any other valence 3 atom, assuming that full shells are not being displayed, but that's a pretty off the wall assumption, so I'm going to go with A Bohr Model of Lithium. (In the Bohr model, one fills the shells singly before filling them in pairs, like when you board a train...)

    Do I win anything?
  7. Standard membersmw6869
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    01 Mar '08 23:14
    Originally posted by agryson
    Given ATY's comment above, this is obviously a Bohr model for either lithium or any other valence 3 atom, assuming that full shells are not being displayed, but that's a pretty off the wall assumption, so I'm going to go with A Bohr Model of Lithium. (In the Bohr model, one fills the shells singly before filling them in pairs, like when you board a train...)

    Do I win anything?
    Would you accept a kiss from Granny?

    granny.
  8. Joined
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    02 Mar '08 02:38
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    Looks like it with the three electrons. In fact it seems to be in some sort of excited state, since all three are in separate orbitals. Normally lithium has two in the 1s orbital and the third in the 1p orbital, but this thing has them separate.
    I don't know much about chemistry but I always thought that there had to be at least two electrons in the first orbital for there to be any in the second and then there has to be eight in the second for there to be any in the third and so on a so forth.
  9. Standard memberadam warlock
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    02 Mar '08 09:41
    Originally posted by tomtom232
    I don't know much about chemistry but I always thought that there had to be at least two electrons in the first orbital for there to be any in the second and then there has to be eight in the second for there to be any in the third and so on a so forth.
    In excited states it doesn't have to be like that. If the atom is at minimum energy configuration things are just like you say but if you someway transfer some energy to the atom electrons may migrate to higher energy orbits.
  10. Joined
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    02 Mar '08 11:14
    It's a simple schematic picture not supposed to imitate any atom.
    The orbitals don't make sense. 3 trajectories are used only for aesthetic reasons.
    Or maybe it's a flower with 3 bees around it.
  11. Joined
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    02 Mar '08 11:34
    Anyway, who said those rings were orbitals? In a real atom the electrons don't really move in an orbit, but could be at one place a certain distance from the nucleus and then at another but not on any orbit... Thats what I was taught at least
  12. Standard memberadam warlock
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    02 Mar '08 12:00
    Originally posted by tomtom232
    Anyway, who said those rings were orbitals? In a real atom the electrons don't really move in an orbit, but could be at one place a certain distance from the nucleus and then at another but not on any orbit... Thats what I was taught at least
    This was one of the first atomic models. A rather simplistic one but really good for some purposes.
  13. Standard memberadam warlock
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    02 Mar '08 12:00
    Originally posted by serigado
    It's a simple schematic picture not supposed to imitate any atom.
    The orbitals don't make sense. 3 trajectories are used only for aesthetic reasons.
    Or maybe it's a flower with 3 bees around it.
    Buy a subscription and join the Sacrifice Clan already. 😛
  14. Standard memberflexmore
    Quack Quack Quack !
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    02 Mar '08 12:20
    Originally posted by rhb
    http://www.timeforchess.com/img/forums/forum-science.gif

    Is it Lithium? My Chemistry is a bit rusty.
    This is a symbol exemplifying the power of:
    -PAWN TO KING 4 (see dot to top right),
    -PAWN TO QUEEN 4 (see dot top left) ,
    -COUNTERATTACK (see dot at bottom) .. and
    -MATING COMBINATION (see great big dot in the middle)

    The loopy rings demonstrate that all parts of the board can be connected.

    Of course the mainstream theory has it's opponents:
    some people think the great big dot in the middle represents the power of the centre ... but they are stupid.
  15. Joined
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    28 Jul '08 03:47
    I posted this question in the posers and puzzles forum:

    How many differently shaped isomers of Methylcyclohexane are there?

    There has not been an agreed upon answer. The thread is:

    http://www.redhotpawn.com/board/showthread.php?subject=Methylcyclohexane&threadid=97587
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