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  1. Standard member sh76
    Civis Americanus Sum
    09 Nov '11 15:29
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Pce7o32pqc

    Are electrical outlets soon to go the way of telephone cords?
  2. 09 Nov '11 15:36
    No. Since you don't want your fields to interfere with everything, the appliance has to be very close to the wireless transmitter. So it's mostly an aesthetic improvement rather than a practical one.
  3. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    09 Nov '11 16:26
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    No. Since you don't want your fields to interfere with everything, the appliance has to be very close to the wireless transmitter. So it's mostly an aesthetic improvement rather than a practical one.
    Generally this kind of tech would have one in a house but with different frequencies a number of them could exist side by side with little interference. Take a look at cell phones, you can have 4 of them going at once inside the same car, people in front and back and nobody interferes.
  4. 09 Nov '11 16:32 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Generally this kind of tech would have one in a house but with different frequencies a number of them could exist side by side with little interference. Take a look at cell phones, you can have 4 of them going at once inside the same car, people in front and back and nobody interferes.
    The difference is wireless technology is used for communication and in this case you need to transfer power. Needless to say, the magnitude of radiation in the latter case is much greater, and you get much losses if you try to use this long-range. Appliances also expect an input with a certain frequency.
  5. Subscriber WoodPush
    Pusher of wood
    09 Nov '11 17:30
    Seems like you wouldn't want to be "charging" an entire house simply because you'd be wasting all that energy sending out waves to who-knows-where (and possibly nowhere).

    I assume the power-mat gets around this by detecting the device and only charging the device once it knows its there, and where it can focus the charging in the right place. (!?).

    Powermat built into roads, charging your electric car, anyone? Ah.. one can dream.
  6. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    10 Nov '11 02:29
    Originally posted by WoodPush
    Seems like you wouldn't want to be "charging" an entire house simply because you'd be wasting all that energy sending out waves to who-knows-where (and possibly nowhere).

    I assume the power-mat gets around this by detecting the device and only charging the device once it knows its there, and where it can focus the charging in the right place. (!?).

    Powermat built into roads, charging your electric car, anyone? Ah.. one can dream.
    Roads charging cars were discussed on an NPR program last week, just as a dreamcase. The cost would be in the trillions no doubt, having to tear up the existing roadways, installing millions of mats, then using about 100 nuclear reactors to power them up....
  7. 10 Nov '11 12:33
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Roads charging cars were discussed on an NPR program last week, just as a dreamcase. The cost would be in the trillions no doubt, having to tear up the existing roadways, installing millions of mats, then using about 100 nuclear reactors to power them up....
    You can do a more limited and practical scheme where you use electric buses charged at bus stops.
  8. Standard member uzless
    The So Fist
    10 Nov '11 16:01
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    nstalling millions of mats, ....
    that's one way to get rid of all those used tires!
  9. 10 Nov '11 20:00
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Generally this kind of tech would have one in a house but with different frequencies a number of them could exist side by side with little interference. Take a look at cell phones, you can have 4 of them going at once inside the same car, people in front and back and nobody interferes.
    Yeah - but my mobile phone does interfere with my computer's speakers. It's not so much interference with other chargers you should worry about, but interference with devices of a different kind. It's very hard to keep that area reliable - in fact, we're not managing it quite perfectly right now.
    Fun fact - in my town, there was an automatic door opener or something like that, in a shop, which interfered with the electric keys of their (and their neighbours' customers' cars. Nobody was happy in that street until they found the culprit and did something about it, but apparently it was a rather subtle problem, as it took weeks to find.

    Richard
  10. 10 Nov '11 20:04
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Roads charging cars were discussed on an NPR program last week, just as a dreamcase. The cost would be in the trillions no doubt, having to tear up the existing roadways, installing millions of mats, then using about 100 nuclear reactors to power them up....
    Not to mention running the risk of killing the electronics of any pre-mat-build personal vehicle that drives across it. Or the even greater risk of being sued for gazillions of dollars on the accusation of having done so.

    Richard
  11. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    11 Nov '11 03:02
    Originally posted by Shallow Blue
    Not to mention running the risk of killing the electronics of any pre-mat-build personal vehicle that drives across it. Or the even greater risk of being sued for gazillions of dollars on the accusation of having done so.

    Richard
    That would not be a problem, it would only transfer energy to a receiving coil tuned to the same frequency. I know about cell phones causing buzzing in computer speakers, happens here too.
  12. 14 Nov '11 16:51
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    The difference is wireless technology is used for communication and in this case you need to transfer power. Needless to say, the magnitude of radiation in the latter case is much greater, and you get much losses if you try to use this long-range. Appliances also expect an input with a certain frequency.
    What if it was on a world wide scale like Nikola Tesla's vision?

    http://www.damninteresting.com/teslas-tower-of-power/
  13. 14 Nov '11 20:37
    Originally posted by Metal Brain
    What if it was on a world wide scale like Nikola Tesla's vision?

    http://www.damninteresting.com/teslas-tower-of-power/
    Way to lossy and dangerous.

    You would fry most of the worlds computers and electrical grids... and probably quite a few people as well.
    Plus the power requirements would be huge.
  14. 16 Nov '11 04:05
    Originally posted by googlefudge
    Way to lossy and dangerous.

    You would fry most of the worlds computers and electrical grids... and probably quite a few people as well.
    Plus the power requirements would be huge.
    Why do you suppose Tesla thought it was possible? He was a smart man.
  15. 16 Nov '11 12:35
    Originally posted by Metal Brain
    Why do you suppose Tesla thought it was possible? He was a smart man.
    Yes but he was also delusional and mentally unstable.