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Site Ideas Forum

Site Ideas Forum

  1. Standard member Redmike
    Godless Commie
    29 Oct '08 23:05 / 1 edit
    can we have a separate, temporary forum for the US election, so we can get all the dross out of the debates forum?

    Should only be needed for a couple of months - they should have sorted out the legal challenges and everything else by xmas.
  2. Standard member HandyAndy
    Non sum qualis eram
    31 Oct '08 01:12
    Originally posted by Redmike
    can we have a separate, temporary forum for the US election, so we can get all the dross out of the debates forum?

    Should only be needed for a couple of months - they should have sorted out the legal challenges and everything else by xmas.
    All you're doing is adding to the dross.
  3. Standard member Mctayto
    Highlander
    31 Oct '08 01:33
    Originally posted by Redmike
    can we have a separate, temporary forum for the US election, so we can get all the dross out of the debates forum?

    Should only be needed for a couple of months - they should have sorted out the legal challenges and everything else by xmas.
    Stuff the US election, not worth a single second to write code for such a pathetic subject. Even americans don't give a to$$ re the election.
  4. Subscriber huckleberryhound
    Devout Agnostic.
    31 Oct '08 08:24
    Originally posted by Redmike
    can we have a separate, temporary forum for the US election, so we can get all the dross out of the debates forum?

    Should only be needed for a couple of months - they should have sorted out the legal challenges and everything else by xmas.
    If you want to get the dross out of the debates forum, i think deletion of the forum entirely would be the quickest option.
  5. 31 Oct '08 09:09
    I don't understand why there is so much writing about the election in RHP? Most of the Americans don't vote at all. And the president-to-be is elected by the minority of the Americans. Do we talk about the greatest democracy in the World, or don't we?

    This election is dirty from the beginning to the end. It's about skin color, it's about ... well everything but his/her ability to run USA.
  6. Standard member HandyAndy
    Non sum qualis eram
    31 Oct '08 13:14
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    I don't understand why there is so much writing about the election in RHP? Most of the Americans don't vote at all. And the president-to-be is elected by the minority of the Americans. Do we talk about the greatest democracy in the World, or don't we?
    Check your facts, Fabian.. most Americans do vote. More than 122 million people cast ballots in the 2004 presidential election, or slightly more than 60 percent of eligible voters. This year's totals are expected to be higher.
  7. Standard member Phlabibit
    Mystic Meg
    31 Oct '08 14:18
    Originally posted by HandyAndy
    Check your facts, Fabian.. most Americans [b]do vote. More than 122 million people cast ballots in the 2004 presidential election, or slightly more than 60 percent of eligible voters. This year's totals are expected to be higher.[/b]
    60% vote
    50% of 60% is 30%
    In a close race, 32% of Americans elected the president.

    I believe first time around with Bush Gore got the popular vote but lost the electorate.

    That means less than 30% of the people elected Bush.

    Just crunching some numbers, could be wrong?

    P-
  8. Standard member Palynka
    Upward Spiral
    31 Oct '08 14:36 / 3 edits
    Originally posted by Phlabibit
    60% vote
    50% of 60% is 30%
    In a close race, 32% of Americans elected the president.

    I believe first time around with Bush Gore got the popular vote but lost the electorate.

    That means less than 30% of the people elected Bush.

    Just crunching some numbers, could be wrong?

    P-
    Well, he said Americans not Americans which are eligible to vote. So technically, it is correct that more than 50% of the Americans don't vote.

    People who vote/Total Americans = 122/300 = 40% (rough approx.). Since you have the electoral college, you could have less than 20% of Americans deciding on who your next president will be. Crazy, huh?

    Edit - This is a general feature of democracies, though, I'm not saying that the US is different in any way.

    Edit 2 - Apart from the electoral college part, of course.
  9. Standard member uzless
    The So Fist
    31 Oct '08 15:10
    Originally posted by Palynka
    Well, he said Americans not Americans which are elligible to vote. So technically, it is correct that more than 50% of the Americans don't vote.

    People who vote/Total Americans = 122/300 = 40% (rough approx.). Since you have the electoral college, you could have less than 20% of Americans deciding on who your next president will be. Crazy, huh?

    Edit - ...[text shortened]... the US is different in any way.

    Edit 2 - Apart from the electoral college part, of course.
    even less will decide who is president if you were to take out the states that always vote republican and the states that always vote democrat....
  10. Standard member HandyAndy
    Non sum qualis eram
    31 Oct '08 15:15
    Originally posted by Palynka
    Well, he said Americans not Americans which are elligible to vote. So technically, it is correct that more than 50% of the Americans don't vote.

    People who vote/Total Americans = 122/300 = 40% (rough approx.). Since you have the electoral college, you could have less than 20% of Americans deciding on who your next president will be. Crazy, huh?

    Edit - ...[text shortened]... the US is different in any way.

    Edit 2 - Apart from the electoral college part, of course.
    All Americans are not eligible voters. Roughly 25 percent of the 300 million you cite are under 18 years of age. In 2004, there were approximately 225 million eligible voters. The number who actually voted topped 50 percent.
  11. Standard member Palynka
    Upward Spiral
    31 Oct '08 15:17
    Originally posted by uzless
    even less will decide who is president if you were to take out the states that always vote republican and the states that always vote democrat....
    I think there's a difference between deciding on a vote and being the "decider"(http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=CFefI29TVi4).

    But if you want to go that route, only the median voters of the swing-states are decisive.
  12. Standard member Palynka
    Upward Spiral
    31 Oct '08 15:18
    Originally posted by HandyAndy
    All Americans are not eligible voters. Roughly 25 percent of the 300 million you cite are under 18 years of age. In 2004, there were approximately 225 million eligible voters. The number who actually voted topped 50 percent.
    Read my first paragraph.
  13. Standard member HandyAndy
    Non sum qualis eram
    31 Oct '08 15:20
    Originally posted by Phlabibit
    60% vote
    50% of 60% is 30%
    In a close race, 32% of Americans elected the president.

    I believe first time around with Bush Gore got the popular vote but lost the electorate.

    That means less than 30% of the people elected Bush.

    Just crunching some numbers, could be wrong?

    P-
    Estimates for 2004 are that Bush won 30.8 percent of the total eligible vote.
  14. Standard member HandyAndy
    Non sum qualis eram
    31 Oct '08 15:24
    Originally posted by Palynka
    Read my first paragraph.
    Are you counting children? When Fabian said "most Americans don't vote at all," I doubt that he was referring to Americans under 18.
  15. Standard member Palynka
    Upward Spiral
    31 Oct '08 15:35
    Originally posted by HandyAndy
    Are you counting children? When Fabian said "most Americans don't vote at all," I doubt that he was referring to Americans under 18.
    Yes.

    I don't care what he meant. The statement 'Most Americans don't vote at all' is not technically incorrect with respect to the last elections. I addressed this in the first paragraph of my post, why are you insisting?