1. weedhopper
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    24 Nov '08 01:491 edit
    I met someone last week who grew up Catholic, but said she never went through some kind of confirmation. She described it by saying that, at around 12 years of age, the child goes through some litany of exercises and then GETS SLAPPED IN THE FACE.

    I'm 50 years old, and thought I'd heard every possible anti------- (fill-in-the-blank with your favorite religion), but this one is new. Can any Catholics out there explain to me what she could possibly be talking about? Is there some truth that this barbaric practice really exists?
  2. Joined
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    24 Nov '08 02:101 edit
    Originally posted by PinkFloyd
    I met someone last week who grew up Catholic, but said she never went through some kind of confirmation. She described it by saying that, at around 12 years of age, the child goes through some litany of exercises and then GETS SLAPPED IN THE FACE.

    I'm 50 years old, and thought I'd heard every possible anti------- (fill-in-the-blank with your favorit ...[text shortened]... uld possibly be talking about? Is there some truth that this barbaric practice really exists?
    She is probably describing the Sacrament of Confirmation, which is celebrated in Orthodox churches and in some anglo-catholic churches as well as in the Catholic Church. It is supposed to be based on the Pentecost, when the Holy Spirit descended upon the apostles and gave them the gifts of preaching and to speak in tongues. The sacrament is supposed to confirm upon baptised Christians the gifts to continue in their Catholic faith.

    Your friend is wrong on a number of points, however. It is not always given at 12 years of age. Eastern Catholics receive it usually when still infants along with Baptism. In some places, it is not given until adulthood. The slap is not 'barbaric', either. Normally the bishop just pats the cheek of the person as a symbol of Christ's call to 'turn the other cheek' and the persecution suffered by the early Christians; it is intended to remind the Christian that along with the gifts of the Holy Spirit comes responsibility and persecution. It is not painful; it is merely symbolic. It is also customary for the bishop to say 'Peace be with you' at the time of the slap.
  3. England
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    24 Nov '08 13:38
    a new one on me. the bishops just lay there hand on head at confirmation thats all ive ever seen. tho the confermation is between baptism then taking the sacroment, think in R.C its seven years of age and anglican its 12.
  4. Joined
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    24 Nov '08 14:11
    Originally posted by stoker
    a new one on me. the bishops just lay there hand on head at confirmation thats all ive ever seen. tho the confermation is between baptism then taking the sacroment, think in R.C its seven years of age and anglican its 12.
    It varies between countries. Normally in the Latin church, a person would receive Confirmation before First Communion, generally at the age of seven. In western countries, this custom is rarely observed. Confirmation is generally delayed until after twelve years. In some parts of Australia, it is not given until the age of graduation. Possibly also the slap is not observed in other countries. Not sure.
  5. Standard memberNemesio
    Ursulakantor
    Pittsburgh, PA
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    24 Nov '08 19:42
    Originally posted by Conrau K
    It varies between countries. Normally in the Latin church, a person would receive Confirmation before First Communion, generally at the age of seven. In western countries, this custom is rarely observed. Confirmation is generally delayed until after twelve years. In some parts of Australia, it is not given until the age of graduation. Possibly also the slap is not observed in other countries. Not sure.
    It is not observed in the Western Church in America. I had never heard of it!

    It's a very interesting symbol.

    Do you believe that the historical practice was that it was indeed a slap and
    that it was subsequently interpreted with the more gentle symbolic slap?

    Nemesio
  6. Standard memberChronicLeaky
    Don't Fear Me
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    24 Nov '08 21:071 edit
    Originally posted by Nemesio

    Do you believe that the historical practice was that it was indeed a slap and
    that it was subsequently interpreted with the more gentle symbolic slap?

    Nemesio
    I'd like to extrapolate this line of questioning to the conferring of knighthood with swords. Perhaps at one point the broken clavicle was a real status symbol.

    (And dammit, man! Take the timeout against RC.)
  7. Standard memberDoctorScribbles
    BWA Soldier
    Tha Brotha Hood
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    25 Nov '08 01:20
    More common is the Western tradition of the priest getting a slap on the wrist.
  8. SubscriberAThousandYoung
    Just another day
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    25 Nov '08 01:24
    Originally posted by DoctorScribbles
    More common is the Western tradition of the priest getting a slap on the wrist.
    A slap and tickle?
  9. Joined
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    22 Jun '09 22:23
    Watch your langugue!
  10. Standard memberSwissGambit
    Caninus Interruptus
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    22 Jun '09 22:54
    Originally posted by daniel58
    Watch your langugue!
    What are you complaining about - the word "dammit"? That's not even a real curse word anymore. 😛
  11. Standard membercaissad4online
    Child of the Novelty
    San Antonio, Texas
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    23 Jun '09 05:52
    It also involves the taking of a "confirmation name"
    Been there, done that, then left.
  12. Joined
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    23 Jun '09 20:07
    I know, I'm a Catholic but may I ask why did you leave?
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