1. Joined
    19 Jul '08
    Moves
    77354
    05 Jan '10 19:47
    If there is such a thing as absolute truth in a belief, how could one prove it not only to others but to himself?
  2. Standard memberua41
    Sharp Edge
    Dulling my blade
    Joined
    11 Dec '09
    Moves
    14434
    05 Jan '10 20:13
    Truth is too relative. It's a quality we try to pin to things for a concrete understanding when it's too elusive considering all the perceptions that's going to be involved when comprehending said truth. It gives rise to a bunch of different responses.

    And just because it's something established doesn't mean its up to interpretation- let's take the color purple- I'm going to view it one way and you the other. The certain things it evokes out of me will be different for you et cetera. In other words, I think absolute truth is how you have perceived/experienced something and it can't be contained in qualifications because the qualifications themselves water down the very meaning of said truth.
  3. Joined
    19 Sep '04
    Moves
    5014
    05 Jan '10 23:48
    Absolute truth? What is true to you may not be true to every other human being in this planet. Have an absolutely nice, joyful day with your significant other. 🙂
  4. Joined
    11 Nov '05
    Moves
    43938
    06 Jan '10 00:03
    Originally posted by galveston75
    If there is such a thing as absolute truth in a belief, how could one prove it not only to others but to himself?
    If you try to prove a religious truth with scientific methods, then you will ultimately fail.

    What you believeis an absolute truth may be not be so for others. If you try to prove your truth to another, then you dismiss his beliefs. How do you feel when someone is trying to prove their absolute truth against yours?

    There are as many religious truths as there are people in the world. Yours is just one of them. Can anyone be proven? No of course not. Religious truths cannot be proven at all. If so, there wouldn't be religious.
  5. Standard membermenace71
    Can't win a game of
    38N Lat X 121W Lon
    Joined
    03 Apr '03
    Moves
    140191
    06 Jan '10 07:07
    I believe there have to be absolute truths otherwise everything is relative. I know on the surface that seems simplistic but think about it. Even in religious or moral realms there has to be some standard by which we measure everything else otherwise once again everything would be relative. I know some moral issues can be deemed as relative but some issues seem to be universally understood as being wrong. Example most cultures would deem that murder was wrong. If everything is relative and you can believe what you want and that is true for you then try jumping off a building and flying away. The absolute truth is you will fall! So somethings are absolutes!


    Manny
  6. Joined
    04 Feb '05
    Moves
    29132
    06 Jan '10 07:37
    Originally posted by galveston75
    If there is such a thing as absolute truth in a belief, how could one prove it not only to others but to himself?
    no there isn't. you believe, that's it. if what you believe happens to be true even better but you cannot prove it to others. belief cannot be proven without ceasing to be belief.
  7. England
    Joined
    15 Nov '03
    Moves
    33497
    06 Jan '10 11:39
    there is one absolute truth ... but i can not absolutely prove it, in truth
  8. Hmmm . . .
    Joined
    19 Jan '04
    Moves
    22131
    08 Jan '10 04:43
    Just some thoughts from a book I just started:

    “It all happens as though the multiplicity of persons…were the condition for the fullness of ‘absolute truth’, as though each person, through his uniqueness, ensured the revelation of a unique aspect of the truth, and that certain sides of it would never reveal themselves if certain people were missing from mankind….”

    —Emmanuel Levinas, quoted in the translator’s introduction to Nine Talmudic Readings By Emmanuel Levinas (my italics in quote).

    As I read it, Levinas is suggesting that even truth that is absolute may be multifaceted and inclusive of unique personal, even seemingly conflicting, perspectives—if only we could see the “fullness”.
  9. Standard memberkaroly aczel
    the Devil himself
    Brisbane,QLD
    Joined
    11 Apr '09
    Moves
    91614
    08 Jan '10 05:46
    Originally posted by vistesd
    Just some thoughts from a book I just started:

    “It all happens as though the multiplicity of persons…were the condition for the fullness of ‘absolute truth’, as though each person, through his uniqueness, ensured the revelation of a unique aspect of the truth, and that certain sides of it would never reveal themselves if certain people were ...[text shortened]... f unique personal, even seemingly conflicting, perspectives—if only we could see the “fullness”.
    Indeed friend. I see people and religons as pieces of a great jigssaw. Every piece is as important as every other one. Everyone has their role to play. From the most wise and intelligent to the most mundane and simple.

    Once you've found your own dharma,(or life path), it is important to stick by it and follow it to the end . The grass often looks greener on the other side, however I believe it is very important to stick with what you know and carry out the actions that you were put on this Earth for.
  10. Hmmm . . .
    Joined
    19 Jan '04
    Moves
    22131
    08 Jan '10 06:07
    Originally posted by karoly aczel
    Indeed friend. I see people and religons as pieces of a great jigssaw. Every piece is as important as every other one. Everyone has their role to play. From the most wise and intelligent to the most mundane and simple.

    Once you've found your own dharma,(or life path), it is important to stick by it and follow it to the end . The grass often looks gr ...[text shortened]... tant to stick with what you know and carry out the actions that you were put on this Earth for.
    And sometimes, as we argue with one another over the pieces to the jigsaw puzzle that we each can see, we might both discover—in that very process—a piece that we hadn’t seen before at all.

    By the way, you made a comment in another thread about the role of imagination in the spiritual/religious journey. I think that is critically important, and often overlooked. I’m letting it percolate in my head for awhile… 🙂
  11. Standard memberkaroly aczel
    the Devil himself
    Brisbane,QLD
    Joined
    11 Apr '09
    Moves
    91614
    08 Jan '10 07:07
    Originally posted by vistesd
    And sometimes, as we argue with one another over the pieces to the jigsaw puzzle that we each can see, we might both discover—in that very process—a piece that we hadn’t seen before at all.

    By the way, you made a comment in another thread about the role of imagination in the spiritual/religious journey. I think that is critically important, and often overlooked. I’m letting it percolate in my head for awhile… 🙂
    Indeed. Imagination and hence origonality leads us to completely new pastures. Sure ,we always incorporate the old, but the origonality of thought ensures that we aren't dogged by the mistakes of the past.
    Copying is death. Origonality (in whatever form) is an ESSENTIAL component to understanding our dharmas.
Back to Top