1. Standard memberGrampy Bobby
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    20 Dec '14 04:131 edit
    "Caroling during Christmas"

    "Christmas 2014: God became a Child so that we could become the children of God as commemorated in song. Caroling during Christmas was popular even in the 18th century. In Fact most of the popular carols sung today were written during the 18th century and early 19th century."

    * "While Shepherds Watched Their Flocks" The Author: The carol “While Shepherds Watched” dates back to 1703. The words were written by Nahum Tate, (1652–1715). Nahum Tate was born in Dublin, Ireland in 1652. He was the son of clergymen and poet Faithful Teate, who had been rector of Castleterra, Ballyhaise, until his house was burnt and his family attacked after he had passed on information to the government about plans for the Irish Rebellion of 1641.

    Nahum followed his father to Trinity College, Dublin in 1668, and graduated BA in 1672. By 1676 he had moved to London and was writing for a living. The following year he had adopted the spelling Tate, which would remain until his death, in 1715, in Southwark, London, England. He was an Irish poet, hymnist and lyricist, who became England’s poet laureate in 1692 in the reign of Queen Anne.

    Tate’s name is connected with the famous “New Version of the Psalms of David,” (1696), for which he collaborated with poet and “Anglican Divine,” Nicholas Brady. “Divines” are clergy whose theological writings have been considered standards for faith, doctrine, worship and spirituality and whose influence has permeated the Anglican Communion in varying degrees through the years.

    A supplement to the “New Version of the Psalms of David” was licensed in 1703, which included the Christmas carol “While Shepherds Watched Their Flocks.” It was the only Christmas hymn authorized to be sung by the Anglican Church, as prior to 1700 only the “Psalms of David” were permitted to be sung. “While Shepherds Watched” is the only song of the sixteen works in the 1700 supplement to still be sung today.

    This carol was written in common meter, (consisting of four lines which alternate between iambic tetrameter and iambic trimeter rhyming in the pattern a-b-a-b), and is based on the Gospel of Luke 2:8-14. Tate and Brady were the first to paraphrase the psalms for singing in rhyme which then became distinctive of their work.

    No doubt the popularity of this carol has been enhanced by the tuneful and familiar melody that was adapted from “Siroe,” an opera by George Frederick Handel. This carol is most commonly sung to two different tunes: Winchester Old in the United Kingdom and a variation on Handel’s “Siroe” arranged by Lowell Mason in the United States. Humorously, children love to parody the words “While shepherds watched their flocks by night” and replacing them with “While Shepherds wash their socks by night!” -From an email received today from a pastor/teacher in New England (Part 1 of 4; Part 2: The Song)
  2. SubscriberFMF
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    20 Dec '14 04:55
    Originally posted by Grampy Bobby
    [b]"Caroling during Christmas"

    "Christmas 2014: God became a Child so that we could become the children of God as commemorated in song. Caroling during Christmas was popular even in the 18th century. In Fact most of the popular carols sung today were written during the 18th century and early 19th century."

    * "While Shepherds Watched ...[text shortened]... rom an email received today from a pastor/teacher in New England (Part 1 of 4; Part 2: The Song)
    The choir at my local church sings absolutely beautiful Javanese Christian music at Christmas time (all year round in fact) which is evocative and contemplative due to its unusual scales and the gamelan backing. They whack out some European carols too which can be stirring and exuberant (easier to sing) but after all these years the local genre of music now seems more authentic... minus the snow, of course. 🙂
  3. Subscriberdivegeester
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    20 Dec '14 09:46
    Originally posted by FMF
    The choir at my local church sings absolutely beautiful Javanese Christian music at Christmas time (all year round in fact) which is evocative and contemplative due to its unusual scales and the gamelan backing. They whack out some European carols too which can be stirring and exuberant (easier to sing) but after all these years the local genre of music now seems more authentic... minus the snow, of course. 🙂
    It rarely snows in the UK at Christmas.
  4. SubscriberFMF
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    20 Dec '14 10:12
    Originally posted by divegeester
    It rarely snows in the UK at Christmas.
    They spray "snow" onto shop windows in shopping malls here.
  5. SubscriberFMF
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    20 Dec '14 10:15
    Originally posted by Suzianne to divegeester on another thread
    Or anyone, apparently, given the threads where it's just you, FMF and one Christian victim.
    You may have a point, Suzianne, on this thread (so far), at least. 😉
  6. Standard memberGrampy Bobby
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    20 Dec '14 13:521 edit
    Originally posted by Grampy Bobby
    "Caroling during Christmas"

    "Christmas 2014: God became a Child so that we could become the children of God as commemorated in song. Caroling during Christmas was popular even in the 18th century. In Fact most of the popular carols sung today were written during the 18th century and early 19th century."

    * "While Shepherds Watched Th ” -From an email received today from a pastor/teacher in New England (Part 1 of 4; Part 2: The Song)
    * "While Shepherds Watched Their Flocks" (Continued)

    "Based on the Gospel account in Luke 2, it reflects the Shepherd’s account of the announcement of the birth of the Messiah. Luke 2:11, “Today in the town of David a Savior has been born to you; He is Christ the Lord.” Shepherds in ancient times would sit all night beside their flocks, watching for wolves or other dangers and even feeding orphan lambs with milk on a soaked rag. No doubt this is why these shepherds were seated on the ground the night Jesus was born.

    Naturally these humble men would be fearful, not only for themselves but also for their flock, when the brilliant light and the voices of the angels pierced the silent night. But with what wonder and exultation they must have heard the astounding news! Therefore, is it surprising that they forgot their duty to their flocks and hastened joyfully, though perhaps doubtfully, to see the Holy Babe in the manger with their own eyes?

    I have always found it fascinating that the first group to receive the announcement of the birth our Lord were these lowly shepherds. Not only were they one of the lowest groups in the society, but also those who were the keepers of flock that would produce new lambs. As you know, our Lord was born so that He would become the sacrificial lamb for all of mankind, John 1:29, 36; cf 1 Peter 1:19; Rev 5:6, 12-13.

    John 1:29, “The next day he (John the Baptist) saw Jesus coming to him and said, “Behold, the Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world!”

    Rev 5:6a, “And I saw between the throne (with the four living creatures) and the elders a Lamb standing, as if slain.”

    Rev 5:12-13, “The angels saying with a loud voice, “Worthy is the Lamb that was slain to receive power and riches and wisdom and might and honor and glory and blessing.” 13And every created thing which is in heaven and on the earth and under the earth and on the sea, and all things in them, I heard saying, “To Him who sits on the throne, and to the Lamb, be blessing and honor and glory and dominion forever and ever.”

    Read Luke 2:8–20; cf. Rom 1:3, “Concerning His Son, who was born of a descendant of David according to the flesh.”

    “While shepherds watch’ed their flocks by night, all seated on the ground, the angel of the Lord came down, and glory shone around, and glory shone around.”

    “Fear not!” said he, for mighty dread had seized their troubled minds; “glad tidings of great joy I bring to you and all mankind, to you and all mankind.”

    “To you in David’s town this day is born, of David’s line, the Savior who is Christ the Lord, and this shall be the sign, and this shall be the sign.”

    “The heav’nly Babe you there shall find to human view displayed, all meanly wrapped in swathing bands and in a manger laid, and in a manger laid.”

    “Thus spake the seraph, and forthwith appeared a shining throng of angels praising God, who thus addressed their joyful song, addressed their joyful song.”

    “All glory be to God on high, and to the earth be peace: Good will henceforth from heav’n to men begin and never cease, begin and never cease!”

    Out of gratefulness to God for the precious gift of His Son, we should be anxious to spread His peace and good will to others by means of the Gospel of Jesus Christ and living in His righteousness whenever we can." (Part 2 of 4; The First Noel next)
  7. SubscriberSuzianne
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    21 Dec '14 00:031 edit
    Originally posted by FMF
    You may have a point, Suzianne, on this thread (so far), at least. 😉
    When I wrote that, I was thinking, specifically, of your tag-team attack of sonship in Thread 161951.
  8. SubscriberSuzianne
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    21 Dec '14 00:07
    Originally posted by Grampy Bobby
    [b]"Caroling during Christmas"

    "Christmas 2014: God became a Child so that we could become the children of God as commemorated in song. Caroling during Christmas was popular even in the 18th century. In Fact most of the popular carols sung today were written during the 18th century and early 19th century."
    [/b]
    I have fond memories of caroling with church members and schoolmates when I was a child. I've never been able to carry a tune, but it was mainly being part of a group having fun that I remember from that young age.

    And there was always hot chocolate. 😀
  9. SubscriberFMF
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    21 Dec '14 00:08
    Originally posted by Suzianne
    When I wrote that, I was thinking, specifically, of your tag-team attack of sonship in Thread 161951.
    You didn't like that discussion, is that what you mean?
  10. Subscriberdivegeester
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    21 Dec '14 00:13
    Originally posted by Suzianne
    When I wrote that, I was thinking, specifically, of your tag-team attack of sonship in Thread 161951.
    I recognise that you are a sonship fan, but let's consider your rational here; if more people disagree with a poster than agree with them, is that to be judged as being "tag-teaming"? The term implies an conspiratorial mindset.
  11. SubscriberFMF
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    21 Dec '14 00:16
    Originally posted by Grampy Bobby
    "While Shepherds Watched Their Flocks"
    This carol is blasting out from my neighbour's house this very minute. It's early Sunday morning here and, as is her wont, she likes to play Christian music loud on a Sunday. I think she's kind of asserting herself in a predominantly Muslim neighbourhood that is often awash with the 'Muslim sounds', including Arab-tinged pop and a big fat noisy mosque and its shrill loudspeakers. I've never been a big fan of "While Shepherds Watched Their Flocks" myself; it sounds too much like a national anthem. But then again, so does "Oh Come All Ye Faithful", and I like that one.
  12. SubscriberFMF
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    21 Dec '14 00:18
    Originally posted by divegeester
    I recognise that you are a sonship fan, but let's consider your rational here; if more people disagree with a poster than agree with them, is that to be judged as being "tag-teaming"? The term implies an conspiratorial mindset.
    Does this mean Suzianne is against people saying things on the forum that "attack" other posters?
  13. SubscriberSuzianne
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    21 Dec '14 00:24
    Originally posted by FMF
    You didn't like that discussion, is that what you mean?
    No. What I meant was what I said. I wish you would stop trying to infer that I don't mean what I say.
  14. SubscriberSuzianne
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    21 Dec '14 00:25
    Originally posted by divegeester
    I recognise that you are a sonship fan, but let's consider your rational here; if more people disagree with a poster than agree with them, is that to be judged as being "tag-teaming"? The term implies an conspiratorial mindset.
    No. Again, you're giving a different meaning to what I SAID.

    Classic example of what I'm talking about. FMF has taught you well, padawan.
  15. SubscriberFMF
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    21 Dec '14 00:26
    Originally posted by Suzianne
    No. What I meant was what I said. I wish you would stop trying to infer that I don't mean what I say.
    So you didn't dislike that particular discussion? Or you did? Which is to be?
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