1. Joined
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    18 Jun '07 16:28
    ... this book: 'Letter to a Christian Nation' by Sam Harris. Prehaps you've heard of it or already have read it, but I'd be interested to know what you think of it. If your faith is deeply strong I doubt it would affect you, but still, it would be interesting to hear your opinions.
  2. Illinois
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    18 Jun '07 20:34
    Originally posted by Jake Ellison
    ... this book: 'Letter to a Christian Nation' by Sam Harris. Prehaps you've heard of it or already have read it, but I'd be interested to know what you think of it. If your faith is deeply strong I doubt it would affect you, but still, it would be interesting to hear your opinions.
    Though I am a Christian, I don't consider myself a member of the 'Christian Right', and neither do I think the two necessarily go hand in hand. Because the 'Christian Right' is the most politically active force within the Christian community, they garner the most attention on the national stage, but this does not mean their policies are universally held among believers (nor that they should be). On the flip side, I think many non-believing people don't want to see Christians as anything more than mindless dogma parrots and power-hungry hypocrites, and embrace the concept of the 'Christian Right' as being representative of all believers because it is an easy caricature to draw and to despise, with the added bonus of keeping the unsettling truth espoused by Jesus Christ at arm's length. I've been alienated from many bible study groups, even a church, because of the infusion of politics into faith. The voice non-believers rarely hear is the voice of the silent minority, who seek only to 'carry their own cross' and serve the Lord by actively loving others.
  3. Joined
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    19 Jun '07 01:55
    Originally posted by epiphinehas
    Though I am a Christian, I don't consider myself a member of the 'Christian Right', and neither do I think the two necessarily go hand in hand. Because the 'Christian Right' is the most politically active force within the Christian community, they garner the most attention on the national stage, but this does not mean their policies are universally held ...[text shortened]... o seek only to 'carry their own cross' and serve the Lord by actively loving others.
    At one point I had considered myself as part of the so called "christian right", but I don't ascribe to the teaching that the church will take over political control of the world, eventually. I believe the 'church's' mission is to preach the 'gospel' and add to the 'body of Christ.'
    What do you say?
  4. Donationkirksey957
    Outkast
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    19 Jun '07 01:59
    Originally posted by josephw
    At one point I had considered myself as part of the so called "christian right", but I don't ascribe to the teaching that the church will take over political control of the world, eventually. I believe the 'church's' mission is to preach the 'gospel' and add to the 'body of Christ.'
    What do you say?
    "My kingdom is not of this world." Jesu
  5. Standard memberRuppster1
    Saved by grace.
    State of Denial.
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    19 Jun '07 02:02
    Originally posted by josephw
    At one point I had considered myself as part of the so called "christian right", but I don't ascribe to the teaching that the church will take over political control of the world, eventually. I believe the 'church's' mission is to preach the 'gospel' and add to the 'body of Christ.'
    What do you say?
    You got that right. The church should preach the Gospel and add to the body of Christ and stay out of politics. I am a christian but I strongly believe in the separation of church and state.
  6. Donationrwingett
    Ming the Merciless
    Royal Oak, MI
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    19 Jun '07 02:09
    Originally posted by Jake Ellison
    ... this book: 'Letter to a Christian Nation' by Sam Harris. Prehaps you've heard of it or already have read it, but I'd be interested to know what you think of it. If your faith is deeply strong I doubt it would affect you, but still, it would be interesting to hear your opinions.
    I read the book and thought it was pretty good. But then I'm not a christian....
  7. Joined
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    19 Jun '07 02:09
    Originally posted by kirksey957
    "My kingdom is not of this world." Jesu
    It's like that. Kinda self-evident.
  8. Joined
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    19 Jun '07 02:16
    Originally posted by Ruppster1
    You got that right. The church should preach the Gospel and add to the body of Christ and stay out of politics. I am a christian but I strongly believe in the separation of church and state.
    From the few constitutional scholars I had heard or read about, say it means simply that the government will not officially recognise any one religion. No state approved or regulated churches. Of any kind.
  9. Joined
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    19 Jun '07 15:32
    Originally posted by epiphinehas
    Though I am a Christian, I don't consider myself a member of the 'Christian Right', and neither do I think the two necessarily go hand in hand. Because the 'Christian Right' is the most politically active force within the Christian community, they garner the most attention on the national stage, but this does not mean their policies are universally held ...[text shortened]... o seek only to 'carry their own cross' and serve the Lord by actively loving others.
    I am not an antitheist. Personally I believe that everyone should have the right to religious freedom, and I don't seek to activly convert people away from their faith. I wouldn't lose any sleep if I did, because I feel it would have to be their choise. For Christians who believe that the best way to serve Christ is in doing good and seeking to relieve suffering I have complete respect and hold nothing against you. Personally I wish to do the same with my life, but I would say I'm doing it for other people as opposed to for God.

    However, I do have a problem with the Christian Right and the attitude of some, that all must be converted to save their souls. Obviously I don't apply that to anyone I 'argue' with here, because I've made the choise to come on this site and listen to what you believe. If laws were passed however forceing me to follow srict christian morals then I would not be happy. I find the fact that some Christians in America are trying to block vaccines for sexually transmitted diseases distusting. It is nothing to do with them. They feel that it will increase promiscutity, but even if it did the rate of STDs infection would decrease. In this case they are forceing their beliefs on everyone else.

    So I don't have a problem with you 'carring your own cross' and I agree with those of you who accept that Gods Kingdom is not of this world. I would not seek to stamp out Christianity forcibly.
  10. Joined
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    19 Jun '07 15:36
    Originally posted by josephw
    From the few constitutional scholars I had heard or read about, say it means simply that the government will not officially recognise any one religion. No state approved or regulated churches. Of any kind.
    Do you agree with attempts to stop stem cell research or teach ID in schools? Sure the church and state should be seperate, but what about the churches influence on the state? The Christian Right has huge voting power which is being guided by dubious morals.
  11. London
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    19 Jun '07 15:49
    Originally posted by Ruppster1
    You got that right. The church should preach the Gospel and add to the body of Christ and stay out of politics. I am a christian but I strongly believe in the separation of church and state.
    Should the church stay silent if the State violates human rights?
  12. London
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    19 Jun '07 15:50
    Originally posted by josephw
    From the few constitutional scholars I had heard or read about, say it means simply that the government will not officially recognise any one religion. No state approved or regulated churches. Of any kind.
    Originally, not even that. IIRC, the First Amendment simply meant that Congress could not have a nationally endorsed State Religion. Individual states were free to do so (and many did, in fact).
  13. London
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    19 Jun '07 15:52
    Originally posted by Jake Ellison
    Do you agree with attempts to stop stem cell research or teach ID in schools? Sure the church and state should be seperate, but what about the churches influence on the state? The Christian Right has huge voting power which is being guided by dubious morals.
    No one's trying to stop stem cell research -- just the ones that involve human cloning and destruction of embryos. In fact, adult stem cell research is far more promising from a medical perspective than ESCR and has already yielded several treatments (ESCR has yet to provide one).
  14. Joined
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    19 Jun '07 15:53
    Originally posted by lucifershammer
    Should the church stay silent if the State violates human rights?
    Whats the church got to do with it? Should atheists stay silent if the State violates human rights? Are we just evil?
  15. London
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    19 Jun '07 15:55
    Originally posted by Jake Ellison
    Whats the church got to do with it? Should atheists stay silent if the State violates human rights? Are we just evil?
    You're not answering the question. If the Church speaks up when the State violates human rights, why is that not a violation of the separation of church and state? After all, it's quite clear the Church is trying to influence the State!
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