1. Standard memberHand of Hecate
    Merciless Vagabond
    Deep in it.
    Joined
    08 Feb '05
    Moves
    14614
    05 Jul '13 13:181 edit
    “Sometimes people hold a core belief that is very strong. When they are
    presented with evidence that works against that belief, the new
    evidence cannot be accepted. It would create a feeling that is
    extremely uncomfortable, called cognitive dissonance. And because it
    is so important to protect the core belief, they will rationalize,
    ignore and even deny anything that doesn't fit in with the core belief.”
    - Frantz Fanon
  2. Joined
    29 Dec '08
    Moves
    6788
    05 Jul '13 17:09
    Originally posted by Hand of Hecate
    “Sometimes people hold a core belief that is very strong. When they are
    presented with evidence that works against that belief, the new
    evidence cannot be accepted. It would create a feeling that is
    extremely uncomfortable, called cognitive dissonance. And because it
    is so important to protect the core belief, they will rationalize,
    ignore and even deny anything that doesn't fit in with the core belief.”
    - Frantz Fanon
    Is this a core belief?
    🙂
  3. Joined
    16 Feb '08
    Moves
    86339
    05 Jul '13 19:04
    Originally posted by Hand of Hecate
    “Sometimes people hold a core belief that is very strong. When they are
    presented with evidence that works against that belief, the new
    evidence cannot be accepted. It would create a feeling that is
    extremely uncomfortable, called cognitive dissonance. And because it
    is so important to protect the core belief, they will rationalize,
    ignore and even deny anything that doesn't fit in with the core belief.”
    - Frantz Fanon
    And yet, like a moth to a flame, you are drawn here...
  4. Standard memberkaroly aczel
    the Devil himself
    Brisbane,QLD
    Joined
    11 Apr '09
    Moves
    91583
    05 Jul '13 23:231 edit
    Originally posted by Hand of Hecate
    “Sometimes people hold a core belief that is very strong. When they are
    presented with evidence that works against that belief, the new
    evidence cannot be accepted. It would create a feeling that is
    extremely uncomfortable, called cognitive dissonance. And because it
    is so important to protect the core belief, they will rationalize,
    ignore and even deny anything that doesn't fit in with the core belief.”
    - Frantz Fanon
    Quite. And yet trying to make sense of our lives, (and getting it wrong), is still better than .... actually you know what they say : "Ignorance is bliss". Right?
  5. Joined
    27 Sep '06
    Moves
    9651
    05 Jul '13 23:35
    It never ceases to amaze me how readily man is willing to believe something some man has said merely because is sounds spiritual or enlightened.

    But when one suggests that God has spoken folks have a tizzy fit around here.

    Blind leading the blind.
  6. Joined
    27 Sep '06
    Moves
    9651
    05 Jul '13 23:36
    Originally posted by Hand of Hecate
    “Sometimes people hold a core belief that is very strong. When they are
    presented with evidence that works against that belief, the new
    evidence cannot be accepted. It would create a feeling that is
    extremely uncomfortable, called cognitive dissonance. And because it
    is so important to protect the core belief, they will rationalize,
    ignore and even deny anything that doesn't fit in with the core belief.”
    - Frantz Fanon
    Core belief? You mean like "there is no God"?
  7. Standard membersonship
    the corrected one.
    Joined
    03 Jan '13
    Moves
    8572
    05 Jul '13 23:47
    Originally posted by Hand of Hecate
    “Sometimes people hold a core belief that is very strong. When they are
    presented with evidence that works against that belief, the new
    evidence cannot be accepted. It would create a feeling that is
    extremely uncomfortable, called cognitive dissonance. And because it
    is so important to protect the core belief, they will rationalize,
    ignore and even deny anything that doesn't fit in with the core belief.”
    - Frantz Fanon
    So true.

    Like the apparent evidence of intelligent design in the operation of the molecular machines of the cell. The dreadful cognitive dissonance of clinging the cell's creation by lucky accidents !

    Signature in the Cell By Stephen Meyer.

    YouTube
  8. Standard memberGrampy Bobby
    Boston Lad
    USA
    Joined
    14 Jul '07
    Moves
    43012
    05 Jul '13 23:57
    Originally posted by Hand of Hecate

    “Sometimes people hold a core belief that is very strong. When they are
    presented with evidence that works against that belief, the new
    evidence cannot be accepted. It would create a feeling that is
    extremely uncomfortable, called cognitive dissonance. And because it
    is so important to protect the core belief, they will rationalize,
    ignore and even deny anything that doesn't fit in with the core belief.”
    - Frantz Fanon
    "Death of Frantz Fanon"

    "On his return to Tunis, after his exhausting trip across the Sahara to open a Third Front, Fanon was diagnosed with leukemia. He went to the Soviet Union for treatment and experienced some remission of his illness. On his return to Tunis he dictated his testament The Wretched of the Earth. When he was not confined to his bed, he delivered lectures to ALN (Armée de Libération Nationale) officers at Ghardimao on the Algero-Tunisian border. He made a final visit to Sartre in Rome. In 1961 the CIA arranged a trip to the U.S. for further leukemia treatment.

    He died in Bethesda, Maryland, on December 6, 1961 under the name of Ibrahim Fanon. He was buried in Algeria, after lying in state in Tunisia. Later his body was moved to a martyrs' (chouhada) graveyard at Ain Kerma in eastern Algeria. Fanon was survived by his wife Josie [née Dublé], a French woman, their son Olivier, and his daughter (from a previous relationship) Mireille. Mireille married Bernard Mendès-France, son of the French politician Pierre Mendès France. Josie took her own life in Algiers in 1989, Olivier still works for the Algerian Embassy in Paris." (frantzfanon.wiki)
  9. Subscribersonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    slatington, pa, usa
    Joined
    28 Dec '04
    Moves
    52615
    06 Jul '13 00:01
    Originally posted by sonship
    So true.

    Like the apparent evidence of intelligent design in the operation of the molecular machines of the cell. The dreadful cognitive dissonance of clinging the cell's creation by lucky accidents !

    [b]Signature in the Cell
    By Stephen Meyer.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TVkdQhNdzHU[/b]
    It may LOOK like intelligent design but it could just as easily have been by the rules of nature made out when our universe was born 14 billion years ago. It is the laws of nature that starts all these balls rolling that are truly mind boggling. DNA machinery is for sure mind boggling but that does not by itself prove a god was involved, much as you desperately wish it so.
  10. Standard memberGrampy Bobby
    Boston Lad
    USA
    Joined
    14 Jul '07
    Moves
    43012
    06 Jul '13 00:03
    "The Fox and the Grapes" by Aesop. When the fox fails to reach the grapes, he decides he does not want them after all. Rationalization (making excuses) is often involved in reducing anxiety about conflicting cognitions, according to cognitive dissonance theory.

    In modern psychology, cognitive dissonance is the discomfort experienced when simultaneously holding two or more conflicting cognitions: ideas, beliefs, values or emotional reactions. In a state of dissonance, people may sometimes feel "disequilibrium": frustration, hunger, dread, guilt, anger, embarrassment, anxiety, etc. The phrase was coined by Leon Festinger in his 1956 book When Prophecy Fails, which chronicled the followers of a UFO cult as reality clashed with their fervent belief in an impending apocalypse. Festinger subsequently (1957) published a book called A Theory of Cognitive Dissonance in which he outlines the theory. Cognitive dissonance is one of the most influential and extensively studied theories in social psychology.

    The theory of cognitive dissonance in social psychology proposes that people have a motivational drive to reduce dissonance by altering existing cognitions, adding new ones to create a consistent belief system, or alternatively by reducing the importance of any one of the dissonant elements. It is the distressing mental state that people feel when they "find themselves doing things that don't fit with what they know, or having opinions that do not fit with other opinions they hold." A key assumption is that people want their expectations to meet reality, creating a sense of equilibrium. Likewise, another assumption is that a person will avoid situations or information sources that give rise to feelings of uneasiness, or dissonance.

    Cognitive dissonance theory explains human behavior by positing that people have a bias to seek consonance between their expectations and reality. According to Festinger, people engage in a process he termed "dissonance reduction", which can be achieved in one of three ways: lowering the importance of one of the discordant factors, adding consonant elements, or changing one of the dissonant factors.This bias sheds light on otherwise puzzling, irrational, and even destructive behavior." (cognitivedissonancewikipedia.free encyclopedia)
  11. Joined
    16 Feb '08
    Moves
    86339
    06 Jul '13 09:49
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    It may LOOK like intelligent design but it could just as easily have been by the rules of nature made out when our universe was born 14 billion years ago. It is the laws of nature that starts all these balls rolling that are truly mind boggling. DNA machinery is for sure mind boggling but that does not by itself prove a god was involved, much as you desperately wish it so.
    In a universe of chaos, entropy and energy dissipation, you insisting this (cellular metabolism) could not be intelligent design under any circumstances is cognitive dissonance in action.
  12. Standard membersonship
    the corrected one.
    Joined
    03 Jan '13
    Moves
    8572
    06 Jul '13 10:344 edits
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    It may LOOK like intelligent design but it could just as easily have been by the rules of nature made out when our universe was born 14 billion years ago. It is the laws of nature that starts all these balls rolling that are truly mind boggling. DNA machinery is for sure mind boggling but that does not by itself prove a god was involved, much as you desperately wish it so.


    As much as you desperately wish "rules of nature" just decided to happen without forethought and concept "just as easily" I think that is far less as easy.

    I think it is pretty impossible. What I think is more believable is that our intelligence reads OUT the rules because another intelligence PUT IN the rules.

    You say "It could just as easily been" rules with no rule making designer. "Just as easily" ? All our history of experience with rules governing the operation of machinery doesn't suggest what you propose should have come about just as easily.
  13. Joined
    24 Apr '10
    Moves
    14576
    06 Jul '13 10:53
    Originally posted by divegeester
    In a universe of chaos, entropy and energy dissipation, you insisting this (cellular metabolism) could not be intelligent design under any circumstances is cognitive dissonance in action.
    It may LOOK like intelligent design but it could just as easily have been by the rules of nature made out when our universe was born 14 billion years ago. It is the laws of nature that starts all these balls rolling that are truly mind boggling. DNA machinery is for sure mind boggling but that does not by itself prove a god was involved, much as you desperately wish it so.

    (Bold emphasis added by me)

    That you would summarize this post by stating Sonhouse "Insists this could not be intelligent design under any circumstances" may not be CD, but it's certainly deeply dishonest.
  14. Standard membersonship
    the corrected one.
    Joined
    03 Jan '13
    Moves
    8572
    06 Jul '13 12:13
    It is impossible for me to view the reproduction of a living organism so as to replicate its kind in another one like it, as not involving intelligent design.

    Whether bacteria or human being and all else in between, reproduction without intelligent design is as cognitively dissonant a belief as I can possibly imagine.
  15. Joined
    24 Apr '10
    Moves
    14576
    06 Jul '13 14:51
    Why is it impossible for you?
Back to Top