1. Joined
    02 Apr '06
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    21 May '08 23:16
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/7413268.stm

    'Residents have been ambivalent about condemning the attacks because belief in witchcraft is widespread in the area, he says.

    ....

    Villagers told reporters that they had evidence that the victims were witches.

    They say they found an exercise book at a local primary school that contained the minutes of a "witches' meeting" which detailed who was going to be bewitched next.'



    This is one of the saddest things I think in the modern world. Here are people who, because of what they believe, and have 'evidence' for, are prepared to kill other people. It reminds me that there are still nutters out there, we are still not all that far from the middle ages.
  2. Joined
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    21 May '08 23:301 edit
    Originally posted by snowinscotland
    This is one of the saddest things I think in the modern world. Here are people who, because of what they believe, and have 'evidence' for, are prepared to kill other people. It reminds me that there are still nutters out there, we are still not all that far from the middle ages.[/b]
    Brings the Iraq War to mind amongst other things.
  3. Over there
    Joined
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    21 May '08 23:48
    This is one of the saddest things I think in the modern world. Here are people who, because of what they believe, and have 'evidence' for, are prepared to kill other people. It reminds me that there are still nutters out there, we are still not all that far from the middle ages.[/b]
    Bush had "evidence" that Iraq had WMD's and a war was waged based on that "evidence".
    Different scale but the same mindset. Using "evidence" that the others out there are responsible for our troubles and therefore need to be eliminated is deeply engrained in humans and is seen in all cultures.
    Very few of us have progressed very far past the middle ages. 😕
  4. Joined
    06 May '05
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    9174
    22 May '08 03:15
    Originally posted by snowinscotland
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/7413268.stm

    'Residents have been ambivalent about condemning the attacks because belief in witchcraft is widespread in the area, he says.

    ....

    Villagers told reporters that they had evidence that the victims were witches.

    They say they found an exercise book at a local primary school that contained the mi ...[text shortened]... at there are still nutters out there, we are still not all that far from the middle ages.
    Here's yet another:
    http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20080422/od_uk_nm/oukoe_uk_congo_democratic_witchcraft

    Police in Congo have arrested 13 suspected sorcerers accused of using black magic to steal or shrink men's penises after a wave of panic and attempted lynchings triggered by the alleged witchcraft.

    I wouldn't want to be the guy showing the evidence that someone made my penis "shrink"!
  5. SubscriberAThousandYoung
    Just another day
    tinyurl.com/y8wgt7a5
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    23 Aug '04
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    22 May '08 03:241 edit
    A medieval French document discussing such foul witchery:

    http://www.sacred-texts.com/pag/mm/

    Check out Question IX

    Here's a fun quote:

    There is no doubt that certain witches can do marvellous things with regard to male organs

    🙂
  6. Cape Town
    Joined
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    22 May '08 08:48
    Originally posted by snowinscotland
    This is one of the saddest things I think in the modern world. Here are people who, because of what they believe, and have 'evidence' for, are prepared to kill other people. It reminds me that there are still nutters out there, we are still not all that far from the middle ages.
    Witches, witch hunts and belief in magic in general are still relatively common in Africa.
    However it is more complicated than meets the eye. There are a number of factors that lead to witch hunts.
    1. Superstition. Yes people do believe in magic and are afraid of it.
    2. Jealousy. It is quite common to declare someone a witch even when nobody actually believes that they are but for personal /social reasons. In rural Zambia, jealousy is a very important factor. If anybody gets richer than his neighbors it is only a matter of time before someone decides that the reason he is getting richer is that he is using witchcraft.
    3. Something to blame problems on. One common traditional way to deal with sickness or other misfortune is to hire the local 'medicine man' locally known as the 'witch doctor'. The witch doctor then does some divination and determines which person is the witch who is causing all your problems. You then go and kill the witch and hopefully your problems will go away.

    Of course much of this has parallels in religion.
  7. Joined
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    22 May '08 17:44
    Religion is bad.
  8. Donationbbarr
    Chief Justice
    Center of Contention
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    22 May '08 19:48
    Originally posted by snowinscotland
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/7413268.stm

    'Residents have been ambivalent about condemning the attacks because belief in witchcraft is widespread in the area, he says.

    ....

    Villagers told reporters that they had evidence that the victims were witches.

    They say they found an exercise book at a local primary school that contained the mi ...[text shortened]... at there are still nutters out there, we are still not all that far from the middle ages.
    Too bad we can't acculturate these savages.
  9. Joined
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    3637
    22 May '08 21:36
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    Witches, witch hunts and belief in magic in general are still relatively common in Africa.
    However it is more complicated than meets the eye. There are a number of factors that lead to witch hunts.
    1. Superstition. Yes people do believe in magic and are afraid of it.
    2. Jealousy. It is quite common to declare someone a witch even when nobody actually b ...[text shortened]... d hopefully your problems will go away.

    Of course much of this has parallels in religion.
    I think you have touched upon a truth there - the excuse to do away with opposition and strengthen one's own position is probably a better way of looking at it...
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