1. SubscriberFMF
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    29 Aug '11 06:43
    The four weeks of fasting here in Indonesia (indeed, all around the world) have almost come to an end. During the past month, as ever, we have occasionally seen Christian TV celebrities being interviewed about how they have been fasting alongside their Muslim friends by way of empathy, solidarity etc. What - in the minds of Christians here, or in the minds of Muslims (if there are any) - would be the spiritual value of such Christian fasting?
  2. Subscribersonhouse
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    29 Aug '11 07:33
    Originally posted by FMF
    The four weeks of fasting here in Indonesia (indeed, all around the world) have almost come to an end. During the past month, as ever, we have occasionally seen Christian TV celebrities being interviewed about how they have been fasting alongside their Muslim friends by way of empathy, solidarity etc. What - in the minds of Christians here, or in the minds of Muslims (if there are any) - would be the spiritual value of such Christian fasting?
    They spent less on food?
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    29 Aug '11 10:06
    Originally posted by FMF
    The four weeks of fasting here in Indonesia (indeed, all around the world) have almost come to an end. During the past month, as ever, we have occasionally seen Christian TV celebrities being interviewed about how they have been fasting alongside their Muslim friends by way of empathy, solidarity etc. What - in the minds of Christians here, or in the minds of Muslims (if there are any) - would be the spiritual value of such Christian fasting?
    fasting in general or christians fasting in solidarity with muslims?
  4. SubscriberFMF
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    29 Aug '11 11:08
    Originally posted by Zahlanzi
    fasting in general or christians fasting in solidarity with muslims?
    I refer you to the OP and thread title.
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    29 Aug '11 11:16
    Originally posted by FMF
    The four weeks of fasting here in Indonesia (indeed, all around the world) have almost come to an end. During the past month, as ever, we have occasionally seen Christian TV celebrities being interviewed about how they have been fasting alongside their Muslim friends by way of empathy, solidarity etc. What - in the minds of Christians here, or in the minds of Muslims (if there are any) - would be the spiritual value of such Christian fasting?
    This is a Muslim view:

    http://newsweek.washingtonpost.com/onfaith/guestvoices/2009/08/ramadans_spiritual_discipline.html
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    29 Aug '11 11:31
    Originally posted by FMF
    I refer you to the OP and thread title.
    they live in the same society, they respect each other customs. they are different but understand they should cooperate towards a better, common future, a future that can hold both groups.


    it is nice.
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    29 Aug '11 11:56
    Originally posted by FMF
    The four weeks of fasting here in Indonesia (indeed, all around the world) have almost come to an end. During the past month, as ever, we have occasionally seen Christian TV celebrities being interviewed about how they have been fasting alongside their Muslim friends by way of empathy, solidarity etc. What - in the minds of Christians here, or in the minds of Muslims (if there are any) - would be the spiritual value of such Christian fasting?
    What do you think of it FMF?
  8. SubscriberFMF
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    29 Aug '11 12:05
    Originally posted by JS357
    This is a Muslim view:

    http://newsweek...
    An American perspective too, perhaps. Interesting little piece, thanks.
  9. SubscriberFMF
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    29 Aug '11 12:12
    Originally posted by divegeester
    What do you think of it FMF?
    Well I don't fast. It strikes me as worthy if some Indonesian Christians want to demonstrate empathy with their non-Christian friends, although most do probably just like to quietly assert their 'difference' and thus their identity in a society that is predominantly Muslim. Jesus fasted for a long period, and yet fasting in this way seems to have been expunged from the Christian tradition. I do wonder why Jesus thought it had spiritual value but his followers no longer do (or at least they don't seek to emulate him).
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    29 Aug '11 23:53
    Originally posted by FMF
    Well I don't fast. It strikes me as worthy if some Indonesian Christians want to demonstrate empathy with their non-Christian friends, although most do probably just like to quietly assert their 'difference' and thus their identity in a society that is predominantly Muslim. Jesus fasted for a long period, and yet fasting in this way seems to have been expunged ...[text shortened]... spiritual value but his followers no longer do (or at least they don't seek to emulate him).
    Yes it is interesting; I know Christian people who do fast and do get a lot from it, although I've never done so myself.

    I had a think about your op for a few hours, and have decided that despite it being locally socially appropriate, it is not the right thing for a Christian to do. Fasting is for seeking God; if those who are fasting seek 'another' God, then a Christian should not join them.
  11. SubscriberFMF
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    30 Aug '11 02:57
    Originally posted by divegeester
    I had a think about your op for a few hours, and have decided that despite it being locally socially appropriate, it is not the right thing for a Christian to do. Fasting is for seeking God; if those who are fasting seek 'another' God, then a Christian should not join them.
    Most mainstream Indonesians, both Christian and Muslim, see their monotheist God as one in the same. Wouldn't a Christian fasting be seeking God just in the same way as a Muslim fasting would be seeking God? How could your personal fasting bring you closer to a "wrong" God?
  12. SubscriberFMF
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    30 Aug '11 02:59
    Originally posted by divegeester
    Yes it is interesting; I know Christian people who do fast and do get a lot from it, although I've never done so myself.
    Why do you think Christ thought - and demonstrated that - fasting had spiritual value but Christ's followers don't seek to emulate him?
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    30 Aug '11 04:33
    Originally posted by FMF
    Why do you think Christ thought - and demonstrated that - fasting had spiritual value but Christ's followers don't seek to emulate him?
    Exactly....
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    30 Aug '11 05:04
    Originally posted by FMF
    Why do you think Christ thought - and demonstrated that - fasting had spiritual value but Christ's followers don't seek to emulate him?
    It isn't entirely without emulation. In my religious training, Roman Catholic school, run by Franciscans, Lent was the way to do this, and it was taken seriously, with each of us supposed to decide what we were giving up for 40 days and tell our teacher/nun what it was. In addition, communion was supposed to be received every Sunday without breakfast beforehand. But only if you were without sin since your last Confession.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lent
  15. SubscriberFMF
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    30 Aug '11 05:51
    Originally posted by JS357
    It isn't entirely without emulation. In my religious training, Roman Catholic school, run by Franciscans, Lent was the way to do this, and it was taken seriously, with each of us supposed to decide what we were giving up for 40 days and tell our teacher/nun what it was. In addition, communion was supposed to be received every Sunday without breakfast beforehand. But only if you were without sin since your last Confession.
    Muslims fast from sunrise to sunset for a month here! And yes I remember Lent and Sunday mornings from when I was a kid. But it strikes me as a rather insipid emulation!
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