1. Joined
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    22 Mar '07 21:24
    I just got into a discussion about death and those that fear it. I assumed that everyone did to some degree, however, it was brought to my attention that perhaps not everyone does. Firstly, is there anyone here with the cahoona's to say that they do not fear death? Secondly, if you believe in God is this fear at the core of your belief system? In other words, if it were not for this fear, would you be a person of faith? And lastly, if you do not believe in a God, how do you cope and face your fear of death?
  2. Standard memberreader1107
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    22 Mar '07 21:44
    Originally posted by whodey
    I just got into a discussion about death and those that fear it. I assumed that everyone did to some degree, however, it was brought to my attention that perhaps not everyone does. Firstly, is there anyone here with the cahoona's to say that they do not fear death? Secondly, if you believe in God is this fear at the core of your belief system? In other wo ...[text shortened]... aith? And lastly, if you do not believe in a God, how do you cope and face your fear of death?
    I don't have cahoonas but I don't fear death either. Why should I? If there is no afterlife, there is nothing to fear. If the afterlife is divided between the smoking and non-smoking section, I still have nothing to fear. If a God looked at my life and decided that I wasn't worthy to ever be in his/her presence, then that's really not the sort of deity that I'd want to spend eternity with anyway. I don't believe at all in any interim location, but even if there were one, as long as it doesn't include ironing, cooking, or long division, I don't see anything to fear there either. I'd be interested in hearing why people DO fear death.
  3. Melbourne, Australia
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    22 Mar '07 22:11
    Originally posted by whodey
    I just got into a discussion about death and those that fear it. I assumed that everyone did to some degree, however, it was brought to my attention that perhaps not everyone does. Firstly, is there anyone here with the cahoona's to say that they do not fear death? Secondly, if you believe in God is this fear at the core of your belief system? In other wo ...[text shortened]... aith? And lastly, if you do not believe in a God, how do you cope and face your fear of death?
    I fear death to the extent that it means the end of my existence. I reconcile that with two thoughts:
    1. everything else goes through the same thing.
    2. my existence continues after my death in the memories and actions of the people I touch - my wife, my kids, my friends, my students ...
  4. Joined
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    22 Mar '07 22:58
    Originally posted by whodey
    I just got into a discussion about death and those that fear it. I assumed that everyone did to some degree, however, it was brought to my attention that perhaps not everyone does. Firstly, is there anyone here with the cahoona's to say that they do not fear death? Secondly, if you believe in God is this fear at the core of your belief system? In other wo ...[text shortened]... aith? And lastly, if you do not believe in a God, how do you cope and face your fear of death?
    I think fear is the wrong word. I certainly do not fear death, why would I? It's not a big skeleton in a cowl, coming to chop me up with a scythe. Death is merely the end of consciousness, where my first person-hood ends and I am not so wedded to the notion of my identity that I cannot bear the idea of its cessation. In some way I find comfort in knowing that my various atoms will return to the great matter reserve of the universe, perhaps to one day be taken up as part of a beautiful girl's lips, or a drop of mist from off Niagra falls, who knows?

    I rue that I must stop being conscious because existing is great, but the various energy fluctuations that make up my man-shaped area of space will likely be put to good use somewhere else, once my consciousness ceases.
  5. Melbourne, Australia
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    22 Mar '07 23:08
    Originally posted by Starrman
    I think fear is the wrong word. I certainly do not fear death, why would I? It's not a big skeleton in a cowl, coming to chop me up with a scythe. Death is merely the end of consciousness, where my first person-hood ends and I am not so wedded to the notion of my identity that I cannot bear the idea of its cessation. In some way I find comfort in knowi ...[text shortened]... ped area of space will likely be put to good use somewhere else, once my consciousness ceases.
    Nice way to look at it.
    Thanks.
  6. Joined
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    22 Mar '07 23:11
    Originally posted by whodey
    I just got into a discussion about death and those that fear it. I assumed that everyone did to some degree, however, it was brought to my attention that perhaps not everyone does. Firstly, is there anyone here with the cahoona's to say that they do not fear death? Secondly, if you believe in God is this fear at the core of your belief system? In other wo ...[text shortened]... aith? And lastly, if you do not believe in a God, how do you cope and face your fear of death?
    I fear death a humongous amount, and I find I am unable to reconcile that fear, at all.
  7. Melbourne, Australia
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    22 Mar '07 23:18
    Originally posted by Bad wolf
    I fear death a humongous amount, and I find I am unable to reconcile that fear, at all.
    Some types of Buddhist thought have some interesting thoughts and practices on reducing ones fear of death - the Tibetans for example ...
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    22 Mar '07 23:38
    Originally posted by Starrman
    I think fear is the wrong word. I certainly do not fear death, why would I? It's not a big skeleton in a cowl, coming to chop me up with a scythe. Death is merely the end of consciousness, where my first person-hood ends and I am not so wedded to the notion of my identity that I cannot bear the idea of its cessation. In some way I find comfort in knowi ...[text shortened]... ped area of space will likely be put to good use somewhere else, once my consciousness ceases.
    Well spoken, Starrman. I agree with you (although for me it's not important what happens to my atoms).

    For me there's only one thing that counts: if you want a life on this planet then you have to accept death. That's the deal. Complaining about death is simply silly: no death=no life.

    What I do fear is dying young or to die in a painful way.

    A good long life and a quick death: I would consider myself lucky. No fear!
  9. Standard memberscottishinnz
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    23 Mar '07 00:13
    Originally posted by Starrman
    I think fear is the wrong word. I certainly do not fear death, why would I? It's not a big skeleton in a cowl, coming to chop me up with a scythe. Death is merely the end of consciousness, where my first person-hood ends and I am not so wedded to the notion of my identity that I cannot bear the idea of its cessation. In some way I find comfort in knowi ...[text shortened]... ped area of space will likely be put to good use somewhere else, once my consciousness ceases.
    Exunctly.
  10. Standard memberRaven69
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    23 Mar '07 00:56
    Originally posted by Bad wolf
    I fear death a humongous amount, and I find I am unable to reconcile that fear, at all.
    Get Death a restraining order...
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    23 Mar '07 02:05
    there is worse things than death
  12. Standard memberscottishinnz
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    23 Mar '07 02:29
    Originally posted by EcstremeVenom
    there is worse things than death
    I always wonder about this - I mean, who would know?
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    23 Mar '07 02:37
    Originally posted by scottishinnz
    I always wonder about this - I mean, who would know?
    there are things in this life that is worse than death for example what if you were very sick and every minute and every breathe was painful? then death might be something you look forward to
  14. Melbourne, Australia
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    23 Mar '07 03:01
    Originally posted by EcstremeVenom
    there are things in this life that is worse than death for example what if you were very sick and every minute and every breathe was painful? then death might be something you look forward to
    I think Scotts point was you need a reference to be able to make some sort of comparison. If I say, this is worse than death, I'd really need to have some sort of knowledge of death to be able to compare that thing against it.
    Since you are clearly alive, you can hardly have this knowledge of death.

    By the way, when talking about plural 'things' it's ARE - as in there are things in life that ARE worse than death ...
  15. Joined
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    23 Mar '07 03:542 edits
    Originally posted by Bad wolf
    I fear death a humongous amount, and I find I am unable to reconcile that fear, at all.
    Thanks for your honesty. I to was terribly unsettled by the notion of death before I became a Christian. For me it was like being on the Titanic as it was sinking watching people make light of the situation or ignoring it altogether. I think part of the problem is that there are so many distractions in life which takes our minds off the prospect of dying that we do not spend much time thinking of its implications. The implications for me, at least, were coming to grips with what life is really all about. I think there is a comfort level with the notion of death in that we all have been told and know we will die. The inevitability of the situation I think lulls us to sleep. The only other option is to worry ourselves sick with the prospect which does us no good because it is inevitable. For me, however, this simply was not good enough. Deep down inside I knew that this was not how to live ones life. I am a firm believer in that we must confront our demons if we are ever to overcome them. I also knew that my life had meaning and a purpose that I felt would be a crime to igonre as well. I think Socrates had it right when he said that an unexamined life is not worth living. Granted, I knew that the inevitability of death was not in my control, however, what I do in the meantime I knew was in my control. I think fear can be a good thing in that it alerts us to danger. However, allowing this fear to control us I think is where we make our mistake just as it is, if not more so, ignoring such fear.
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