1. Account suspended
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    14 May '11 08:411 edit
    Nearly half of Britons believe the Bible is an important book but many fail to realise
    its influence on everyday language, a survey suggests.

    More people believe the expression "a drop in the bucket" originated from Tony Blair
    - at 12% - than from the Bible - at just 7% - an online poll for the Bible Society has
    shown.

    The research into the views of 2,379 people carried out earlier this month showed
    nearly the same proportion believed the phrase "the writing on the wall" was from
    the Beatles, at 18%, as from the Bible, at 19%.

    Fewer than one in 10 people, at 9%, knew the expression "eat, drink and be merry"
    was from the New Testament, with 41% saying they thought it was from
    Shakespeare.

    The only Bible phrase to be identified correctly out of a list of five by a majority of
    Britons, at 56%, was the expression "my brother's keeper" - from the words of
    Cain in Genesis "Am I my brother's keeper?".

    The findings come in spite of nearly half, or 46%, saying they believed the Bible was
    an important book and had valuable messages.

    The survey was released as the Bible Society in England and Wales and the Scottish
    Bible Society launched a project inviting people to handwrite parts of the Bible using
    a digital pen to mark the 400th anniversary of the King James Bible. The results will
    be uploaded onto the internet and available online.

    The "People's Bible" tour of Britain will begin at Edinburgh Castle on June 19 on the
    anniversary of the birth of King James VI of Scotland at the castle in 1566.

    Luke Walton, culture programme manager at the Bible Society, said: "It's clear that
    people's knowledge of the Bible is limited and they just don't realise how significant
    and wide-ranging its influence has been.

    "We hope that this project will help people, once again, to value the Bible."


    http://breakingnews.heraldscotland.com/breaking-news/?mode=article&site=hs&
    id=N0444611305243468540A
  2. England
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    14 May '11 12:331 edit
    most use the term a drop in the ocean, and some belive its a apple that adam took from,, but the influence of the bible is not the terms its the message and teachings of our moral duty to care and show we care in our laws .. which is suprizing that the only party ive heard promoting christian values and not a multi law is the BNP
  3. Account suspended
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    14 May '11 12:38
    Originally posted by stoker
    most use the term a drop in the ocean, and some belive its a apple that adam took from,, but the influence of the bible is not the terms its the message and teachings of our moral duty to care and show we care in our laws.
    it used to be. Have you never been a witness in a court of Law? i dont know if they still do it, but i have sworn to tell the truth upon the Bible at least twice to my recollection.
  4. England
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    14 May '11 18:46
    they offer a alternative for non belivers and other faiths, still has the same legal oath but does not mention god just to tell the truth the whole truth and nothing but the truth.
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    14 May '11 19:55
    Originally posted by stoker
    they offer a alternative for non belivers and other faiths, still has the same legal oath but does not mention god just to tell the truth the whole truth and nothing but the truth.
    wussies, where's the accountability?
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    14 May '11 20:131 edit
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    Nearly half of Britons believe the Bible is an important book but many fail to realise
    its influence on everyday language, a survey suggests.

    More people believe the expression "a drop in the bucket" originated from Tony Blair
    - at 12% - than from the Bible - at just 7% - an online poll for the Bible Society has
    shown.

    The research into t scotland.com/breaking-news/?mode=article&site=hs&
    id=N0444611305243468540A
    So what? Many modern expressions can be traced to 'pagan' writers like Cicero. Cicero is valuable but it has nothing to do with any current linguistic impact but with the endurance of the ideas behind those expressions.
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    14 May '11 20:16
    Originally posted by Conrau K
    So what? Many modern expressions can be traced to 'pagan' writers like Cicero.
    so the British public has no clue to what is contained in the most widely distributed, most widely translated collection of little books in the entire history of humanity, that's what.
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    14 May '11 20:33
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    so the British public has no clue to what is contained in the most widely distributed, most widely translated collection of little books in the entire history of humanity, that's what.
    So either they have a poor education system, or the origin of phrases is not considered that important in their education system.

    I must note however that Chinese has a lot of sayings that match almost word for word the English ones, and many of them are older than the Bible.
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    14 May '11 20:36
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    so the British public has no clue to what is contained in the most widely distributed, most widely translated collection of little books in the entire history of humanity, that's what.
    Personally, I am more disappointed that few have read Virgil's Aeneid. Why should I care about biblical literacy?
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    14 May '11 20:56
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    So either they have a poor education system, or the origin of phrases is not considered that important in their education system.

    I must note however that Chinese has a lot of sayings that match almost word for word the English ones, and many of them are older than the Bible.
    you cannot blame the education system, almost every home has a bible, its just not highly regarded, or not regarded enough for people to read.
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    14 May '11 20:58
    Originally posted by Conrau K
    Personally, I am more disappointed that few have read Virgil's Aeneid. Why should I care about biblical literacy?
    well ok, whatever rocks your socks, yes why should you care?
  12. Standard memberkaroly aczel
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    14 May '11 23:11
    Jonathan Agnew shakes his head, but then doesn't know if it's for the former, the latter or both 🙂
  13. Standard memberAgerg
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    15 May '11 01:123 edits
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    you cannot blame the education system, almost every home has a bible, its just not highly regarded, or not regarded enough for people to read.
    I don't see why it necessarily deserves to be highly regarded. Yes we can acknowledge that it forms part of the history of humanity, but that it deserves veneration is a tall ask. That it is so widely distributed speaks less of its virtue and more of the barbarism via which it was forced onto people throughout history. Even to this day people have its contents rammed down their throat long before they are an age where they can rationally decide for themselves whether Christianity is the path they want to walk, and so this mass early indoctrination induces further distribution of the book to fulfil the growing demand for it on the part of the brainwashed who want their own damned copy of the thing or parents who buy it for their children. Then of course you have the sheep mentality where people shopping for a religion, or base of spirituality appeal to the large number of Christian adherents (attained largely via the points above) as a measure of its veracity, and thus they too want a Bible, and so it continues...

    That there are so many of the things knocking about is of no consequence to me when considering whether it's contents should be revered or not. Indeed The Sun is one of the most popular newspapers in the UK,football is one of the most popular sports across the globe, does that mean I should have any respect for them? I think not! 😞
  14. Standard memberRJHinds
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    15 May '11 07:57
    Originally posted by Agerg
    I don't see why it necessarily deserves to be highly regarded. Yes we can acknowledge that it forms part of the history of humanity, but that it deserves veneration is a tall ask. That it is so widely distributed speaks less of its virtue and more of the barbarism via which it was forced onto people throughout history. Even to this day people have its contents ...[text shortened]... ar sports across the globe, does that mean I should have any respect for them? I think not! 😞
    They did not do a very good job of ramming it down your throat.
    I see nothing wrong with the sheep mentality as long as they have
    a good shepard to guide them. Against all odds, it continues.
  15. SubscriberProper Knob
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    15 May '11 09:20
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    so the British public has no clue to what is contained in the most widely distributed, most widely translated collection of little books in the entire history of humanity, that's what.
    The Bible is also the most commonly shoplifted book in America.
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