Karma or Christ?

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Spirituality 28 Apr '13 18:18
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    28 Apr '13 18:18
    The Golden Rule sits at the heart of many of the world’s religions and philosophies. But until Jesus Christ the rule was generally stated in the negative—do not treat others in a way that you do not want to be treated. In effect, this rule flows out of the idea of karma.

    In our society we think we should be able to do whatever we desire as long as it supposedly does not harm others. And we think that if we are unjust and bring pain to someone else we should keep a hard hat on; karma is on the lookout for us. When someone “gets away” with a wrong action we believe that somewhere down the road the offender will get what’s coming. Sadly, it is not just the world at large that thinks this way; too many Christians do as well.

    Jesus Christ not only desires for us to refrain from wrong and hurtful action, he commands us to live in a righteous manner. He said, “You have heard that it was said, ‘You shall love your neighbor and hate your enemy.’ But I say to you, love your enemies, bless those who curse you, do good to those who hate you, and pray for those who spitefully use you and persecute you, that you may be sons of your Father in heaven; for He makes His sun rise on the evil and on the good, and sends rain on the just and on the unjust. For if you love those who love you, what reward have you (Matthew 5:43-46)?

    What this means is that in this age of karma, Jesus Christ thrusts grace front and center. Grace means that we do what is right and even go above and beyond the call of duty. And when we do those actions they are noble, righteous, beautiful and truly good; like God. Our actions are God-like, because this is the way He has acted toward us. “For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whoever believes in Him should not perish but have everlasting life. For God did not send His Son into the world to condemn the world, but that the world through Him might be saved (John 3:16, 17).”

    Our sins demanded karma, justice, damnation; our sins demand that we should perish. But in grace God reaches out to us in Christ and says “Although your sins make you my enemy, I do not wish you harm, instead I desire to forgive you and offer you everlasting life (Romans 5:6-11). If we sinners were without grace the cost of karma would mean our perishing forever. Karma cannot accept when Christ said on the cross, “It is finished (John 19:30).” Karma must punish; love and grace must offer forgiveness.

    Too many people in the world embrace karma when they should embrace Christ. Karma tells the world to do no harm. Christ tells us to “love one another; as I have loved you (John 13:34).” And sometimes the world treats grace as an insult unless grace becomes tolerant of sin. Jesus loved the sinner but he also said “Go and sin no more (John 8:11).” Karma says we need to affirm people. Grace says we need to love them and offer them redemption.

    But what about those people who reject God’s offer of grace and forgiveness? Scripture says, “Do not be deceived, God is not mocked; for whatever a man sows, that he will also reap (Galatians 6:7).” And, “the wages of sin is death (Romans 6:23).” As they say, karma’s a bitch. So which would you choose karma or Christ?



    http://essentialmatters.blogspot.com/2013/04/karma-or-christ.html?showComment=1367172850791#c1192357375553175955
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    28 Apr '13 19:35
    Originally posted by checkbaiter
    The Golden Rule sits at the heart of many of the world’s religions and philosophies. But until Jesus Christ the rule was generally stated in the negative—do not treat others in a way that you do not want to be treated. In effect, this rule flows out of the idea of karma.

    In our society we think we should be able to do whatever we desire as long as it ...[text shortened]... matters.blogspot.com/2013/04/karma-or-christ.html?showComment=1367172850791#c1192357375553175955
    It appears to me to be the essence of the idea that one is ego centric the other concerned for the welfare of others. We dont do bad things because bad things will happen to us, when in fact we should be pro-actively seeking doing good things for others, in a self sacrificing way.
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    28 Apr '13 19:57
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    It appears to me to be the essence of the idea that one is ego centric the other concerned for the welfare of others. We dont do bad things because bad things will happen to us, when in fact we should be pro-actively seeking doing good things for others, in a self sacrificing way.
    Exactly, I always hear the saying, "what goes around comes around", and never thought much of it. In fact I kind of agreed with it in a loose way. But after thinking about it, that is based on Karma as well.
    As the author of this blog often says to me..."always give grace to others". Now that, is sound and godly advise...🙂
  4. SubscriberSuzianne
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    30 Apr '13 02:26
    Originally posted by checkbaiter
    Exactly, I always hear the saying, "what goes around comes around", and never thought much of it. In fact I kind of agreed with it in a loose way. But after thinking about it, that is based on Karma as well.
    As the author of this blog often says to me..."always give grace to others". Now that, is sound and godly advise...🙂
    I think this is also where many atheists make their mistake. They focus on punishment in the Christian faith, and that's not really where we are at at all (despite some overzealous Christians harping on what the atheists will reap in the end -- I've also done this on occasion in error). All their arguments eventually end with some version of "He'll do that to me? What a monster!", completely removing the actual, real importance of God's Good News.
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    30 Apr '13 10:46
    Originally posted by Suzianne
    I think this is also where many atheists make their mistake. They focus on punishment in the Christian faith, and that's not really where we are at at all (despite some overzealous Christians harping on what the atheists will reap in the end -- I've also done this on occasion in error). All their arguments eventually end with some version of "He'll do tha ...[text shortened]... me? What a monster!", completely removing the actual, real importance of God's Good News.
    It overwhelms them that Christ forgives so freely. So much so they can't believe it. What a Paradox!
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    30 Apr '13 10:53
    Originally posted by checkbaiter
    Our sins demanded karma, justice, damnation; our sins demand that we should perish.

    As they say, karma’s a bitch. So which would you choose karma or Christ?
    I notice that you do not actually throw out the whole Karma concept, but keep it around as a threat.
    I on the other hand believe that the whole Karma concept is flawed. In other words I say that the claim that sin demands punishment is unjustified.
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    30 Apr '13 10:54
    Originally posted by checkbaiter
    It overwhelms them that Christ forgives so freely. So much so they can't believe it. What a Paradox!
    I guess you are one of those that wrongly believes that all atheists are closet theists. Sorry to disillusion you.
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    30 Apr '13 13:40
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    I notice that you do not actually throw out the whole Karma concept, but keep it around as a threat.
    How so?
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    30 Apr '13 16:20
    Originally posted by checkbaiter
    The Golden Rule sits at the heart of many of the world’s religions and philosophies. But until Jesus Christ the rule was generally stated in the negative—do not treat others in a way that you do not want to be treated. In effect, this rule flows out of the idea of karma.

    In our society we think we should be able to do whatever we desire as long as it ...[text shortened]... matters.blogspot.com/2013/04/karma-or-christ.html?showComment=1367172850791#c1192357375553175955
    "The Golden Rule sits at the heart of many of the world’s religions and philosophies. But until Jesus Christ the rule was generally stated in the negative—do not treat others in a way that you do not want to be treated."

    The positive statement of the GR enables active imposition of what we would like done to us, upon others. For example, if Christians would like others to help them become better Christians, they are invoked by the positive GR to proselytize their faith. This version of the GR needs to be carefully considered or else it can become justification for abusive interference in the lives of others. And this has happened in Christianity. The negative GR does not have this vulnerability, at least not to the same degree.
  10. SubscriberSuzianne
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    30 Apr '13 17:15
    Originally posted by JS357
    "The Golden Rule sits at the heart of many of the world’s religions and philosophies. But until Jesus Christ the rule was generally stated in the negative—do not treat others in a way that you do not want to be treated."

    The positive statement of the GR enables active imposition of what we would like done to us, upon others. For example, if Christians would ...[text shortened]... istianity. The negative GR does not have this vulnerability, at least not to the same degree.
    Interesting take, to be sure.
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    30 Apr '13 18:10
    No, the GR as you and others call it, is not the same as the command of Christ. He says "love one another as I have loved you"'. Not to be viewed in a negative way, but as a command to be obeyed out of a thankful heart and as a representative of the Master himself.
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    30 Apr '13 18:351 edit
    Originally posted by checkbaiter
    How so?
    Didn't you read your own post? I quoted the relevant bits for you.
    The problem with Christian theology is it relies heavily on the concept that 'justice'=punishment for crimes/sins committed. However it totally fails to recognise the reason why human justice systems have punishment and other sentences. It basically takes advantage of our evolved 'sense of justice' which causes us to seek revenge and make threats etc which all helps humans to live in societies, but is not really justifiable as a 'law of the universe'.
  13. Standard memberkaroly aczel
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    30 Apr '13 21:22
    Karma is seen in eastern religions as something to be eventually gotten rid of.
    As opposed to what some think, that you are supposed to collect good karma, that is actually not the point. First you are supposed to purify your karma by getting rid of bad karma in your life, by getting good karma, but strangely enough the word "grace" (or a similar word) appears in Sanskrit that says we are transitioning from a world of " law of Karma" into a "law of grace", which is the words many Christians evoke to describe their idea of afterlife/heaven.
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    30 Apr '13 21:40
    Originally posted by checkbaiter
    No, the GR as you and others call it, is not the same as the command of Christ. He says "love one another as I have loved you"'. Not to be viewed in a negative way, but as a command to be obeyed out of a thankful heart and as a representative of the Master himself.
    This approach would help avoid the vulnerability that (IMO) the positive GR would have if it were a central principle in an exclusivist, salvation -oriented religion like many if not most Christians practice.
  15. Standard memberRJHinds
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    01 May '13 00:06
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    I notice that you do not actually throw out the whole Karma concept, but keep it around as a threat.
    I on the other hand believe that the whole Karma concept is flawed. In other words I say that the claim that sin demands punishment is unjustified.
    My opinion is that Karma is a bunch of nonsense and no better than evil-lution.
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