1. Standard memberRJHinds
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    26 Apr '12 09:58
    http://www.news-medical.net/news/2005/06/23/11272.aspx
  2. SubscriberFMF
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    26 Apr '12 10:08
    Argumentum ad populum medicus.
  3. Cape Town
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    26 Apr '12 10:18
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    http://www.news-medical.net/news/2005/06/23/11272.aspx
    Only 75%? What percentage of the population believe in God in the US?

    And why did 15% of doctors say they believe in God but not in an afterlife? What religion is that?
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    26 Apr '12 10:23
    Thread title is misleading, it should be

    'Most medical doctors in the U.S believe in God'
  5. Cape Town
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    26 Apr '12 10:23
    If this is anything to go by:
    http://religions.pewforum.org/reports

    Then doctors are less religious than the general population in the US - and also more likely to not be Christian.
  6. Cape Town
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    26 Apr '12 10:24
    Originally posted by kevcvs57
    Thread title is misleading, it should be

    'Most medical doctors in the U.S believe in God'
    No, it should be 75% of medical doctors in a small survey in the US believe in God.

    75% is not 'most' in my book.
  7. Standard memberRJHinds
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    26 Apr '12 10:25
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    Only 75%? What percentage of the population believe in God in the US?

    And why did 15% of doctors say they believe in God but not in an afterlife? What religion is that?
    I am not an expert on all religions, so I can not tell you. Maybe they are
    just theists like FMF.
  8. Standard memberRJHinds
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    26 Apr '12 10:27
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    No, it should be 75% of medical doctors in a small survey in the US believe in God.

    75% is not 'most' in my book.
    You just can't accept the truth. You are in a sorry state.
  9. Standard memberCalJust
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    26 Apr '12 10:421 edit
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    75% is not 'most' in my book.
    Oh yes? And what book is that?

    Normally, and statistically, 50,1% is most of a particular sample!
  10. Cape Town
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    26 Apr '12 10:56
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    You just can't accept the truth. You are in a sorry state.
    What is this 'truth' that you claim I can't accept?
  11. Cape Town
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    26 Apr '12 11:001 edit
    Originally posted by CalJust
    Oh yes? And what book is that?

    Normally, and statistically, 50,1% is most of a particular sample!
    No, it is not. 'Most' has subtle variation in meaning depending on context.
    If I said: 'most people survive brain surgery' would you take it that 51 or more out of 100 patients survive? I don't think so.
    If I said: 'most people have university degrees', would you take it that 51 or more out of 100 people have university degrees? I don't think so.
    But maybe English is different where you live.
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    26 Apr '12 11:05
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    No, it is not. 'Most' has subtle variation in meaning depending on context.
    If I said: 'most people survive brain surgery' would you take it that 51 or more out of 100 patients survive? I don't think so.
    If I said: 'most people have university degrees', would you take it that 51 or more out of 100 people have university degrees? I don't think so.
    But maybe English is different where you live.
    Indeed. >50% corresponds to a simple majority.

    But most implies more than a simple majority.

    Although personally I would not baulk at 75% of a sample being described as most.

    That would be on the lower limits of what I would accept for the use of the word most.
  13. Standard memberCalJust
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    26 Apr '12 11:08
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    No, it is not. 'Most' has subtle variation in meaning depending on context.
    If I said: 'most people survive brain surgery' would you take it that 51 or more out of 100 patients survive? I don't think so.
    If I said: 'most people have university degrees', would you take it that 51 or more out of 100 people have university degrees? I don't think so.
    But maybe English is different where you live.
    YES, and emphatically so, to both your examples.

    Most by any definition means more than the other alternative, and 51/100 would certainly fulfil that requirement.

    I must say I was really surprised when you stated that even 75% was NOT most of anything.

    Just out of curiosity, how much do you think would qualify as most, in your examples of brain surgery or university degrees? 85%? 95%??
  14. Standard memberRJHinds
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    26 Apr '12 11:09
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    What is this 'truth' that you claim I can't accept?
    The truth in the Holy Bible and that most doctors believe in God.
  15. Standard memberRJHinds
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    26 Apr '12 11:141 edit
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    No, it is not. 'Most' has subtle variation in meaning depending on context.
    If I said: 'most people survive brain surgery' would you take it that 51 or more out of 100 patients survive? I don't think so.
    If I said: 'most people have university degrees', would you take it that 51 or more out of 100 people have university degrees? I don't think so.
    But maybe English is different where you live.
    most
    adj. Superlative of many, much.
    1.
    a. Greatest in number: won the most votes.
    b. Greatest in amount, extent, or degree: has the most compassion.
    2. In the greatest number of instances: Most fish have fins.
    n.
    1. The greatest amount or degree: She has the most to gain.
    2. Slang The greatest, best, or most exciting. Used with the: That party was the most!
    pron.
    (used with a sing. or pl. verb) The greatest part or number: Most of the town was destroyed. Most of the books were missing.
    adv. Superlative of much.
    1. In or to the highest degree or extent. Used with many adjectives and adverbs to form the superlative degree: most honest; most impatiently.
    2. Very: a most impressive piece of writing.
    3. Informal Almost: Most everyone agrees.
    Idiom:
    at (the) most
    At the maximum: We saw him for ten minutes at the most. She ran two miles at most.

    P.S. Using the first definition, 75% is greater than 25%.
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