1. At the Revolution
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    02 Jul '09 16:53
    Before his Revelation, was he a Christian, a Jew, a pagan, or something else?

    I'm genuinely curious.

    Please back up your answer. [glares at daniel58]
  2. SubscriberProper Knob
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    02 Jul '09 17:49
    Originally posted by scherzo
    Before his Revelation, was he a Christian, a Jew, a pagan, or something else?

    I'm genuinely curious.

    Please back up your answer. [glares at daniel58]
    Never met him, so i couldn't say.
  3. Pepperland
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    02 Jul '09 17:58
    Originally posted by scherzo
    Before his Revelation, was he a Christian, a Jew, a pagan, or something else?

    I'm genuinely curious.

    Please back up your answer. [glares at daniel58]
    I'd guess he was a christian.

    "There is very little material on which to base a description of pre-Islamic religion, particularly in Mecca and the Hejaz. The Qur'an and the hadith, or recorded oral traditions, give some hints as to this religion. Islamic commentators have elaborated these hints into a coherent account that most academics doubt in part or in whole.

    Christianity is known to have been active in the region before the rise of Islam, especially unorthodox, possibly gnostic forms of it.[15] Some tribes practised Judaism."

    from the link:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pre-Islamic_Arabia
  4. Account suspended
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    02 Jul '09 18:00
    i think he was a Pagan, for he uttered the so called 'satanic verses', praising the deities of Medina when the people of Medina were going to kick his head in, so that they wouldn't.
  5. At the Revolution
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    02 Jul '09 19:09
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    i think he was a Pagan, for he uttered the so called 'satanic verses', praising the deities of Medina when the people of Medina were going to kick his head in, so that they wouldn't.
    That is true. I don't think he was Christian, but he was probably pagan or Jewish.
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    02 Jul '09 19:12
    Originally posted by scherzo
    That is true. I don't think he was Christian, but he was probably pagan or Jewish.
    Isn't that why they still worship their big-rock?
  7. At the Revolution
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    02 Jul '09 19:14
    Originally posted by TerrierJack
    Isn't that why they still worship their big-rock?
    No. We worship our "big-rock" for the same reasons that Christians worship two perpendicular pieces of wood and Jewish people worship an old wall. No offense meant to other Christians or Jews on this forum.

    In other words, Terrier, be tolerant or be quiet.
  8. Standard memberBosse de Nage
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    02 Jul '09 19:23
    Originally posted by scherzo
    Before his Revelation, was he a Christian, a Jew, a pagan, or something else?

    I'm genuinely curious.

    Please back up your answer. [glares at daniel58]
    I think he was a pagan Arab influenced by Judaism. The local Jewish tribes thought he was nuts. So did the other Arabs. Prophet's wages, I guess. Yet his persecuted following emerged victorious.
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    02 Jul '09 21:32
    Excuse me us Christians DO NOT worship, two perpendicular pieces of wood, we worship ONLY GOD!
  10. Hmmm . . .
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    02 Jul '09 23:37
    I suspect that Bosse is right. The majority Arab culture seems to have been pagan; the Quraysh in Mecca were pagan, and the Ka’aba had become a pagan sanctuary. But neither Judaism nor Christianity were unknown.

    However, I think there were also non-aligned monotheists—called Hanifs—who likely also influenced Muhammad.

    (I’ve read several sources, but the most recent is Reza Aslan’s No god but God.)
  11. Standard memberBosse de Nage
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    03 Jul '09 07:011 edit
    Originally posted by vistesd
    I suspect that Bosse is right. The majority Arab culture seems to have been pagan; the Quraysh in Mecca were pagan, and the Ka’aba had become a pagan sanctuary. But neither Judaism nor Christianity were unknown.

    However, I think there were also non-aligned monotheists—called Hanifs—who likely also influenced Muhammad.

    (I’ve read several sources, but the most recent is Reza Aslan’s No god but God.)
    It's interesting to think about. What seems clear is that pagan or not the city of Mecca was not some primitive backwater but was connected to the intellectual currents of the time. Although Medina was probably better connected.

    Thanks for pointing out the hanifs -- the notion of pre-Islamic monotheistic prophets ignites dormant areas of my historical imagination. Even the wikipedia entry ...
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hanif
  12. Pepperland
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    03 Jul '09 15:01
    Originally posted by scherzo
    No. We worship our "big-rock" for the same reasons that Christians worship two perpendicular pieces of wood and Jewish people worship an old wall. No offense meant to other Christians or Jews on this forum.

    In other words, Terrier, be tolerant or be quiet.
    the cross is a symbolism of christ, the cross itself is not worshipped.
  13. At the Revolution
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    03 Jul '09 21:03
    Originally posted by generalissimo
    the cross is a symbolism of christ, the cross itself is not worshipped.
    Then our "big-rock" is actually what the Prophet Mohammed saw, touched, and kissed.
  14. At the Revolution
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    03 Jul '09 21:03
    Originally posted by Bosse de Nage
    I think he was a pagan Arab influenced by Judaism. The local Jewish tribes thought he was nuts. So did the other Arabs. Prophet's wages, I guess. Yet his persecuted following emerged victorious.
    And here we are.

    That's interesting, and because I know little about the circumstances, I'll take it as true, but do you have a source that can confirm it?
  15. At the Revolution
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    03 Jul '09 21:04
    Originally posted by vistesd
    I suspect that Bosse is right. The majority Arab culture seems to have been pagan; the Quraysh in Mecca were pagan, and the Ka’aba had become a pagan sanctuary. But neither Judaism nor Christianity were unknown.

    However, I think there were also non-aligned monotheists—called Hanifs—who likely also influenced Muhammad.

    (I’ve read several sources, but the most recent is Reza Aslan’s No god but God.)
    Ah. Never mind then, Bosse.
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